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December 2017

Date:
Tuesday, November 8, 2016 - 17:00 PST to Wednesday, November 9, 2016 - 0:30 PST
Location

Room 660, ECS Building
University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:

 

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

WestGrid is pleased to present a free workshop on scientific visualization using VisIt, an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization tool.

With VisIt, users can interactively visualize and analyze 2- and 3-dimensional data defined on structured, adaptive, and unstructured meshes. VisIt users can also animate these datasets in time, and manipulate them with a variety of operators.

Pre-requisites:

  • CLICK HERE to register.
  • No prior visualization experience is required. We will provide sample data and codes for the exercises, or you can bring your own dataset if you would like to visualize it with VisIt.
  • This full-day workshop will feature many interactive hands-on exercises, so attendees will need to bring a laptop (and a powercord) they can use. The laptop should have VisIt installed (http://goo.gl/KcGWHa) prior to the workshop.

Workshop Outline:

  • Introduction and VisIt's GUI overview
  • accessing data and managing files
  • working with plots
  • working with operators
  • interactive tools
  • quantitative analysis
  • making it pretty
  • animation and keyframing
  • data comparison
  • scripting
  • plots, selections, exporting
  • overview of remote visualization resources

Please note that coffee / cookies will be provided in the morning and afternoon breaks, but there will be no organized food so attendees are responsible for their own lunch.

Who Should Attend:
All disciplines and experience levels are welcome. You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing data sets is invited to attend.

Questions:
If you have questions about this session, please email alex.razoumov@westgrid.ca.

 

 

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The featured image, courtesy of Forrest Hoffman and Jamison Daniel of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is a visualization that depicts the carbon dioxide from various sources that are advected individually as tracers in the atmosphere model. Carbon dioxide from the land is shown as plumes during February 1900. Image sourced from the VisIt website gallery.

Date:
Location

You can view the session from any computer either via the live stream on our website or using the Vidyo videoconference software.

 

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

As part of our ongoing initiative to keep our users regularly informed and engaged, WestGrid is hosting our third Community Town Hall session on Tuesday, October 11. If you missed our previous Town Halls, you can view the June presentation and slides here or the August session and slides here.

WestGrid's Executive Director and our Director of Operations will share the results of our User Survey, and the latest updates on the new systems and user data migration plans. Town Hall attendees are welcome to ask questions on these and other topics. 

The session will be streamed live online and is open to any existing WestGrid or Compute Canada user as well as members of the broader research community from all disciplines and departments.

How to Participate:

Step 1:

REGISTER ONLINE.

Step 2:

There are multiple ways to connect to the session. When you register, please indicate your preferred method of participation:

  • Live Webstream 
    At the time of the session, go to http://www.westgrid.ca/live
    Webstream users can listen to and view the presentation but questions must be submitted via email to info@westgrid.ca.
    or
  • Vidyo Software 
    At the time of the session, go to the online videoconference room (WG-Training). 
    Vidyo users can interact with the speakers and ask questions. Note: If you haven't used Vidyo before, you may need to download a free plug-in to run the online software. 

More Information:

Questions and comments are welcome at any time by sending an email to info@westgrid.ca

 

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating institutions
To attend in person, please RSVP no later than 24 hours in advance of the session and indicate at which location you will be attending.

Registation / More Information:

RSVP: rsvp@westgrid.ca

(Please note, if you do not RSVP at least 24 hours in advance of the session, we cannot guarantee the local videoconference room will be available.)

 

Speaker Info
Gino DiLabio
Adjunct Professor, Department of Physics
University of Alberta
Description

Gaussian software allows you to study the properties of molecules and their reactions, particulary in conditions which are difficult or impossible to observe experimentally. Gaussian is regularly used by Dr. Gino DiLabio, an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Alberta. In this talk, DiLabio will highlight some of the top computational challenges his lab encounters and explain how his use of Gaussian on WestGrid computing facilities helps his research team overcome them.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating institutions
To attend in person, please RSVP no later than 24 hours in advance of the session and indicate at which location you will be attending.

Registation / More Information:

RSVP: rsvp@westgrid.ca

(Please note, if you do not RSVP at least 24 hours in advance of the session, we cannot guarantee the local videoconference room will be available.)

 

Speaker Info
Jonathan Dursi
Chief Technology Officer
Compute Canada Calcul Canada
Description

In September last year, Compute Canada (CC) surveyed the Canadian research community to determine how research computing should be planned for and provided over the next five years. In this talk, Jonathan Dursi, CC’s Chief Technology Officer, will share some of the key findings of that national survey and explain how the results will be factored into CC’s strategic plan.

Date:
Tuesday, September 29, 2015 - 7:00 MDT to Wednesday, September 30, 2015 - 7:00 MDT
Location

The Banff Centre

Speaker Info
Description

Cyber Summit 2015: Generation D — Data Scientists of Tomorrow is being organized by the not-for-profit organizations that run the Research and Education Networks in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba: Cybera, SRNet and MRNet.

Expected attendees include over 200 executives, managers, technical staff, and the visionaries who are shaping the future of next-generation IT in educational institutions, governments and startups across the Prairies.This cross-Prairies conference will focus on the evolving discipline of data science and how it affects all citizens, from children to professionals.

The digital citizens of tomorrow will have the option to base their actions and words on rich data and analysis — the Cyber Summit is an opportunity to find out why this is important, and how to get started.

The event will take place September 29-30, 2015 at The Banff Centre, with pre-conference workshops on September 28.

Keynote Speaker:
Kayur Patel
Google Research 

Kayur makes data science tools easier to use, and studies how people apply machine learning to solve problems and build software. As a researcher at Google, he spends a lot of time making data analytics accessible to more people, and has taught classes on visualization and data science, most recently the "Introduction to Data Science" course at Columbia University.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating institutions
To attend in person, please RSVP no later than 24 hours in advance of the session and indicate at which location you will be attending.

Registation / More Information:

RSVP: rsvp@westgrid.ca

(Please note, if you do not RSVP at least 24 hours in advance of the session, we cannot guarantee the local videoconference room will be available.)

 

Speaker Info
Scott Northrup
HPC Analyst
SciNet / Compute Canada Calcul Canada
Description

The CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) parallel programming model harnesses the power of Nvidia graphics processing units (GPUs) to enable dramatic increases in computing performance for graphics, 3D content, video and scientific processing-intensive applications. This talk will provide an introduction to CUDA and examples of applications within research. Participants should be familiar with C/C++ development.

Date:
Location

Room 2012, Earth Sciences Building
University of British Columbia

Registation / More Information:

http://www.pims.math.ca/scientific-event/130715-mpellti

Speaker Info
Description

This is a two-part lecture, investigating how our idea of the world has influenced the development of mathematics. In the first lecture (July 15), I will describe the situation up to the twentieth century, in the second one (July 17) I will follow up to the present time and the global challenges humanity and the planet are facing today.

Lecturer:
Ivar Ekeland was director of PIMS for the period 2003-2008. He is a former President of Université Paris-Dauphine, and held the Canada Research Chair in Mathematical Economics at the University of British Columbia until his retirement in 2011. He is the founding editor of the “Annales de l’Institut Henri Poincaré-Analyse non linéaire” and is currently Editor in Chief of “Mathematics and Financial Economics.” He has also written numerous books and papers in mathematics, economics and finance, and is also a regular contributor to the journal “Nature” as well as to the magazine “Pour la Science.” He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.

Date:
Location

Room 2012, Earth Sciences Building
University of British Columbia

Registation / More Information:

http://www.pims.math.ca/scientific-event/130715-mpellti

Speaker Info
Ivar Ekeland
Lecturer
Description

Lecturer:
Ivar Ekeland was director of PIMS for the period 2003-2008. He is a former President of Université Paris-Dauphine, and held the Canada Research Chair in Mathematical Economics at the University of British Columbia until his retirement in 2011. He is the founding editor of the “Annales de l’Institut Henri Poincaré-Analyse non linéaire” and is currently Editor in Chief of “Mathematics and Financial Economics.” He has also written numerous books and papers in mathematics, economics and finance, and is also a regular contributor to the journal “Nature” as well as to the magazine “Pour la Science.” He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.

Abstract:
This is a two-part lecture, investigating how our idea of the world has influenced the development of mathematics. The first lecture was on July 15 and discussed the situation up to the twentieth century. In part two, Ekeland will follow up to the present time and the global challenges humanity and the planet are facing today.

Date:
Monday, August 26, 2013 - 7:00 EDT to Friday, August 30, 2013 - 7:00 EDT
Location

Waterloo, ON

Registation / More Information:

http://www.ammcs2013.wlu.ca

Speaker Info
Description

AMMCS-2013 is an interdisciplinary international conference in a series of AMMCS meetings held in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. The series aims at promoting interdisciplinary research and collaboration involving mathematical and computational sciences, and highlighting recent advances in Applied Mathematics, Modeling and Computational Science (AMMCS).

It is organized in cooperation with AIMS and SIAM and is supported by the Fields Institute. The conference provides a unique opportunity for in-depth technical discussions and exchange of ideas in all areas involving mathematical and computational sciences, modeling and simulation, as well as their applications in natural and social sciences, engineering and technology, industry and finance. It offers to researchers, industrialists, engineers and students to present their latest research, to interact with the experts in the field, and to foster interdisciplinary collaborations required to meet the challenges of modern science, technology, and society.

Date:
Location

University of Alberta
Edmonton, AB
1-190 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy

Registation / More Information:

http://rsoregistration.ualberta.ca/CourseDescription.do?courseid=6509#sthash.rhkAxUTk.dpuf

Speaker Info
Description

While budgets and their justifications are often not to be considered by reviewers when they score a grant application, these sections are important in obtaining the maximum amount of funding. In addition, if these sections are poorly written, the sections may negatively influence the reviewer's opinion of the applicant. Discussion will include the mechanics of and important considerations when developing a budget.

Date:
Monday, August 26, 2013 - 7:00 PDT to Thursday, August 29, 2013 - 7:00 PDT
Location

University of Victoria
Victoria, BC

Registation / More Information:

http://www.csc.uvic.ca/News/news_post.htm?news_item_id=128

Speaker Info
Description

The Summer Institute for Big Data will introduce participants to some of the most advanced methods, algorithms, and tools, readily available today for analyzing, mining, and visualizing large data sets. Leading faculty members from the University of Victoria, Dr. Alex Thomo and Dr. George Tzanetakis, will be instructors for the summer institute.

The curriculum will cover:

  • SQL (Oracle) Analytic Functions for Database Analytics will be covered at a level accessible to everyone
  • Data Mining Algorithms will be taught at a higher level: Decision Trees, Bayesian Classifiers, Support Vector Machines, AdaBoost, K-means, EM, and Hierarchical Clustering, Apriori and FPTree/FPGrowth
  • Tools to be covered at a level accessible to everyone: Weka, RapidMiner
  • Tools to be covered that require some computer science or engineering backgound: libSVM, Hadoop

Each session will be supported with hands on exercises supported by the instructor and lab assistants allowing participants to practice what is being taught in the class sessions. Basic knowledge of statistics/probability and linear algebra is helpful although not required to follow the material.

Date:
Thursday, July 25, 2013 - 7:00 PDT to Saturday, July 27, 2013 - 7:00 PDT
Location

Simon Fraser University
Vancouver, BC

Registation / More Information:

http://www.physics.sfu.ca/wipc2013

Speaker Info
Description

This is the third annual conference for women physics students, post-docs and early career professionals at SFU Burnaby. This three-day conference will feature seven invited speakers from a wide range of physics fields, three panel discussions on topics relevant to women in physics and parallel sessions where attendees may present their research. In addition there will be plenty of chances to network with women from across Canada at the conference banquet, BBQ and coffee breaks.Travel grants are available for participants from outside the Vancouver area.

Date:
Sunday, November 17, 2013 - 8:00 MST to Friday, November 22, 2013 - 8:00 MST
Location

Denver, CO

Registation / More Information:

http://sc13.supercomputing.org/

Speaker Info
Description

For a quarter of a century, the Supercomputing Conference has served as the crossroads for the entire HPC community. From users and program managers to colleagues and vendors...from government to private industry to academia...SC has provided unparalleled cooperation, unequaled collaboration, and unmatched exposure.

And what better place to celebrate our 25th year than in Denver, Colorado? Located near the center of the continental United States, at the convergence of mountain and prairie, where high-rise buildings greet open range and the earth touches the sky, Denver is a community boldly moving into the future.

Spotlighting the most advanced scientific and technical applications in the world, SC13 will bring together the international supercomputing community for an exceptional program of technical papers, tutorials and timely research posters. The SC13 Exhibition Hall will feature exhibits of the latest and greatest technologies from industry, academia and government research organizations; many of these technologies will be seen for the first time in Denver.

Date:
Location

Attend in person at participating partner institutions.

or

WATCH ONLINE HERE
(livestream begins 11:30 PDT September 25)

Registation / More Information:

rsvp@westgrid.ca (please indicate at which location you will be attending)

 

(Click to enlarge or download - PDF 985 KB)

 

Speaker Info
Lindsay Sill
Interim Executive Director
WestGrid
Description

Interested in expanding HPC use within your research? Not sure where to begin? This introductory session will provide an overview of the WestGrid and Compute Canada resource structures, as well as walk through the basics of getting started with an account.

Any faculty members and graduate students interested in or curious about using HPC are invited to attend. WestGrid support personnel will be on-hand at each site to answer any specific introductory questions attendees may have.

Evaluation Form & Draw Prize

Following the seminar, please take a few moments to fill out an evaluation form and your WestGrid account will be entered into a draw for priority access to computing cycles on WestGrid systems for one month*. If you don’t have a WestGrid account, you will be entered to win a $10 Apple Store gift certificate.

SEMINAR EVALUATION FORM

*Please Note: The "priority access" on WestGrid systems for one month prize will only be available to registered WestGrid users who have been actively using WestGrid systems for the last six months. We will confirm this information in the CCDB.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating partner institutions.

 

WATCH ONLINE VIA WEBSTREAM

Following the seminar, please take a few moments to fill out an evaluation form and your WestGrid account will be entered into a draw for priority access to computing cycles on WestGrid systems for one month*. If you don’t have a WestGrid account, you will be entered to win a $10 Apple Store gift certificate.

SEMINAR EVALUATION FORM

*Please Note: The "priority access" on WestGrid systems for one month prize will only be available to registered WestGrid users who have been actively using WestGrid systems for the last six months. We will confirm this information in the CCDB.

Registation / More Information:

rsvp@westgrid.ca (please indicate at which location you will be attending)

Speaker Info
Drew Leske
WestGrid Site Lead
University of Victoria
Description

This session will provide attendees with a step-by-step tutorial on using WestGrid machines, including demonstrations of how to log in, submit jobs, move data, and troubleshoot problems. This will be an introductory-level session, covering the basics of getting started and providing tips for efficient and effective use of the machines.

WestGrid support personnel will be on-hand at each site to answer more advanced questions attendees may have.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating partner institutions.

Registation / More Information:

rsvp@westgrid.ca (please indicate at which location you will be attending)

Speaker Info
Jonatan Aronsson
WestGrid / Compute Canada Site Lead
University of Manitoba
Description

This session will provide an overview of the compilers and development tools that are available on the WestGrid facilities, with an emphasis on the Intel Compiler Suite for C/C++ and Fortran.

The first part of the talk will discuss common compiler flags and strategies for optimizing and debugging codes within the WestGrid environment. The second part of the presentation will provide a very brief introduction to advanced topics, including parallelization, vectorization with SIMD instructions, and the Intel Kernel Math Library.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating partner institutions.

Registation / More Information:

rsvp@westgrid.ca (please indicate at which location you will be attending)

Speaker Info
Fiona Brinkman
Professor, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Simon Fraser University
Description

Fiona Brinkman, a Professor with the Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Simon Fraser University, uses an interdisciplinary approach to develop improved computational methods that (1) aid prioritization of the most promising infectious disease drug/vaccine/diagnostic targets, and (2) improve our understanding of the evolution of infectious disease to develop more sustainable approaches for infectious disease control.

This type of research generates large volumes of data in the form of DNA/RNA sequences, molecular structures, and molecular network changes - using significant amounts of space and computational power in the analysis.

In this talk, Brinkman will highlight selected research projects, outlining the top computational challenges her lab encounters, explaining how WestGrid facilities are used to help overcome those challenges, and highlight key outcomes achieved as a result.

Image Caption:
One of Brinkman’s current projects is the InnateDB project, which involves collecting information about molecular interactions associated with the immune system, to facilitate more systems-based analyses of immune responses to infection. Shown here is a collection of molecular interactions associated with innate immunity, with those added in 2011 and 2012 highlighted in red.

Date:
Thursday, October 17, 2013 - 22:30 PDT to Friday, October 18, 2013 - 0:00 PDT
Location

University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC

Registation / More Information:

https://www.cs.ubc.ca/event/2013/10/quick-simple-and-easy-solutions-hard-software-problems-dls-talk-martin-rinard-mit

Speaker Info
Martin Rinard
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Description

We present quick, simple, and easy solutions to hard software problems such as security vulnerabilities, memory leaks, addressing errors, infinite loops, program optimization, and automatic parallelization. Each solution is implemented as an automated program transformation that takes as input a program that may have one or more of these problems and produces as output a program without the problem. The key to these solutions is transcending the traditional requirement that program transformations preserve the semantics of the original program.  We show how transcending this requirement to focus on more relevant requirements such as acceptability and accuracy can open up new and productive directions across the entire software lifecycle.

Date:
Thursday, October 31, 2013 - 22:30 PDT to Friday, November 1, 2013 - 0:00 PDT
Location

University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC

Registation / More Information:

https://www.cs.ubc.ca/event/2013/10/sorcery-science-hollywood-physics-computational-science-dls-talk-eitan-grinspun-columb

Speaker Info
Eitan Grinspun
Columbia University
Description

Computer Graphics applications require mathematical models and simulation software that captures the qualitative, characteristic behavior of a physical system, even at very coarse discretizations. Our research group develops such numerical tools by using ideas from discrete differential geometry and discrete geometric mechanics. We build a discrete picture from the ground up, mimicking the axioms, structures, and symmetries of the smooth setting. The result is a discrete (hence immediately computable) model of the system, and in particular one that preserves conservation laws. Over time, we have been learning that these computations can be useful not just for filmmaking, but also for developing consumer products, medical research, and basic physical understanding.

Date:
Thursday, November 21, 2013 - 23:30 MST to Friday, November 22, 2013 - 1:00 MST
Location

Univesity of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC

Registation / More Information:

https://www.cs.ubc.ca/event/2013/11/world-touch-illusions-dls-talk-vincent-hayward-universite-pierre-et-marie-curie

Speaker Info
Vincent Hayward
Université Pierre et Marie Curie
Description

During mechanical interaction with our environment, we have a perceptual experience that can be compared to that of audition or vision. The tactile modality is based on mechanics and on its infinite complexities. Feeling objects, like in vision and audition, relies on the solution of a vast inverse problem, which is at the root of many ambiguities. To make matters more interesting, there is mounting evidence that many percepts, such as shape, texture, rigidity, speed, size, and on on, can be elicited through multiple sensing modes that blur the boundaries traditionally, and probably incorrectly, erected between touch and kinesthesia. From these ambiguities many illusions can arise when provoked by staging the proper conditions. In our group, we strive to build equipment to study them and take advantage of them for practical purposes. Sometimes, we can come up with informative, or even predictive explanations.

Date:
Location

University of Manitoba
EITC E2-461

Registation / More Information:

http://www.cs.umanitoba.ca/seminars/

Speaker Info
Ashish Singh
MSc. Student, Department of Computer Science
University of Manitoba
Description

We present a dog-tail interface for utility robots, as a means of communicating high-level robotic state through affect. This interface leverages people’s general knowledge of dogs and their tails (e.g., wagging means happy) to communicate robotic state in an easy to understand way. In this talk, we present the details of our tail construction, and the results of a study which explored a base case of people’s reactions to the tail: how various parameters of tail movements and configuration influence perception of the robot’s zoomorphized affective state.

Date:
Location

University of British Columbia
DMP 301, 6245 Agronomy Road

Registation / More Information:

https://www.cs.ubc.ca/event/2013/07/darren-cosker-talk-dynamic-facial-processing-and-motion-capture-basic-research-applica

Speaker Info
Darren Cosker
Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science
University of Bath
Description

In this talk I will outline some of the challenges in creating facial performances and using facial models in visual effects. In particular, I will attempt to distinguish between academic challenges and industrial demands, and attempt to highlight some of the shared challenges.

I will also describe some of the work that myself and my group have been performing in the area of 4D facial processing. I will describe how this has led to us stepping back to focus on first solving more 'basic' (or fundamental) computer vision research problems - particularly in the area of optical flow, non-rigid tracking and shadow removal.

Finally, I will also describe some of graphics and animation projects with companies linked to our Centre for Digital Entertainment - in particular real time and physics based character animation with Disney Research and Electronic Arts.

Date:
Wednesday, October 2, 2013 - 16:00 PDT to Thursday, October 3, 2013 - 0:00 PDT
Location

University of Victoria
Room EOW-430, Engineering Office Wing Building

Registation / More Information:

https://www.westgrid.ca/support/training_and_outreach/visualization_workshop

Speaker Info
Description

The full-day workshops will explore the basics of scientific visualization and focus on ParaView, an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization application that enables users to quickly build visualizations to analyze their data using qualitative and quantitative techniques. The workshops will be interactive and feature practical exercises using 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional data sets.

The full course outline, other workshop details, and archives of past workshop materials, can be found here.

Please note, space is limited.
Registrations will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis.

Date:
Wednesday, October 16, 2013 - 16:00 CDT to Thursday, October 17, 2013 - 0:00 CDT
Location

University of Manitoba
Room 360, Helen Glass Building

Registation / More Information:

https://www.westgrid.ca/support/training_and_outreach/visualization_workshop

Speaker Info
Brian Corrie
Visualization Coordinator, WestGrid; and Technical Director, IRMACS Centre
Simon Fraser University
Description

The full-day workshops will explore the basics of scientific visualization and focus on ParaView, an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization application that enables users to quickly build visualizations to analyze their data using qualitative and quantitative techniques. The workshops will be interactive and feature practical exercises using 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional data sets.

The full course outline, other workshop details, and archives of past workshop materials, can be found here.

Please note, space is limited.
Registrations will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis.

Date:
Location

University of Calgary
Upper Track - Jack Simpson Gym

Registation / More Information:

http://ucalgary.ca/careers/employers/career-fairs

Speaker Info
Description

The Science and Engineering Career Fair is the largest career fair at the University of Calgary. It attracts approximately 3000 students from the Faculty of Science and the Schulich School of Engineering. Join us in Tweeting about this event using #2013SciEngFair.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating partner institutions.

Registation / More Information:

rsvp@westgrid.ca

(please indicate at which location you will be attending)

Speaker Info
Dr. Ian Foster
University of Chicago/Argonne National Lab
Description

Large and diverse data result in challenging data management problems that researchers and facilities are often ill-equipped to handle. I propose a new approach to these problems based on the outsourcing of research data management tasks to software-as-a-service providers. I argue that this approach can both achieve significant economies of scale and accelerate discovery by allowing researchers to focus on research rather than mundane information technology tasks. I present early results with the approach in the Globus Online data movement, synchronization, and sharing service. I describe our experiences applying Globus Online to supercomputer and experimental facility data management, and outline future work aimed at incorporating data cataloging and analysis capabilities into the framework.

About the Speaker:

Ian Foster is Director of the Computation Institute, a joint institute of the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory. He is also an Argonne Senior Scientist and Distinguished Fellow and the Arthur Holly Compton Distinguished Service Professor of Computer Science. Ian received a BSc (Hons I) degree from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, and a PhD from Imperial College, United Kingdom, both in computer science. His research deals with distributed, parallel, and data-intensive computing technologies, and innovative applications of those technologies to scientific problems in such domains as climate change and biomedicine. Methods and software developed under his leadership underpin many large national and international cyberinfrastructures.

Dr. Foster is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the British Computer Society. His awards include the Global Information Infrastructure (GII) Next Generation award, the British Computer Society's Lovelace Medal, R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. He was a co-founder of Univa UD, Inc., a company established to deliver grid and cloud computing solutions.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Sara Diamond
President
OCAD University
Description

Abstract:

This talk underscores the importance of design methods and practices in approaching challenges in the representation of big data. The talk will first reference debates regarding the role and nature of aesthetics and the importance of these to perception and insight, providing illustrations of different aesthetic approaches, at times to the same data set. It will further the discussion of insight by considering ways to work with users and data sets that draw from different practices within design. Fundamentally, design and designers need to be part of the visual analytics equation. 

About the Speaker:

Dr. Sara Diamond is the President of OCAD University, Canada's "university of the imagination". She holds a PhD in Computing, Information Technology and Engineering from the University of East London, a Masters in Digital Media theory from the University of Arts  London, and Honours Bachelors of Arts in History and Communications from Simon Fraser University. She is a data visualization, wearable technology and mobile media researcher, artist and designer. She developed http://www.codezebra.net/, a social media software and performance and responsive fashion environment. Diamond is founding Chair of the Mobile Experience Innovation Centre and current co-chair (with RBC). She is co-principal investigator on the Centre for Information Visualization/Data Driven Design, an OCAD U/York University major initiative and sits on the board of the National Centre of Excellence GRAND and is the holder of funding from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council and the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating partner institutions.

Registation / More Information:

rsvp@westgrid.ca

(please indicate at which location you will be attending)

Speaker Info
Dr. Rion Dooley
Texas Advanced Computing Centre
University of Texas, Austin
Description

The United States National Science Foundation (NSF)’s Plant Science Cyberinfrastructure Collaborative (PSCIC) program is intended to create a new type of organization – a cyberinfrastructure collaborative for the plant sciences - that enables new conceptual advances through integrative, computational thinking. To achieve this, the iPlant Collaborative was developed. iPlant is a 5 year project to develop and support cyberinfrastructure for the plant biology community. It is community-driven, involving plant biologists, computer and information scientists and engineers, and experts from other disciplines, all working in integrated teams.

The iPlant Collaborative brings together strengths in plant biology, bioinformatics, computational science and high performance computing, as well as innovative approaches to education, outreach, and the study of social networks. The cyberinfrastructure created by iPlant provides the community with two main capabilities: access to world-class physical cyberinfrastructure, and services that promote interactions, communications, and collaborations that advance the understanding and use of computational thinking in plant biology. In this talk we will review the major components of the iPlant cyberinfrastructure developed over the past 5 years, discuss several challenges faced in building the iPlant community, and highlight key challenges facing the project going forward.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating partner institutions.

Registation / More Information:

rsvp@westgrid.ca (please indicate at which location you will be attending)

Speaker Info
Dr. Alex Mihailidis
Associate Professor, Dept of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy & Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering
University of Toronto
Description

As the complexity in the needs of older adults continues to increase, so do the requirements from the technologies that we are designing. No longer can we take a unidimensional approach in the design approach that has often been used in the past, but research and development in this field requires input from a multitude of stakeholders, who must all play a greater role in our traditional design methodologies.

This talk will discuss how collaboration across different technical and clinical disciplines is needed to design technologies that can effectively support and help older adults. It will discuss different approaches that are currently being used to include end users in the design process, and will present examples of technologies that have been developed.

 

About the Speaker:

Alex Mihailidis, Ph.D., P.Eng., is the Barbara G. Stymiest Research Chair in Rehabilitation Technology at the University of Toronto and Toronto Rehab Institute. He is also the Graduate Coordinator for the Clinical Engineering Program. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy (U of T) and in the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (U of T), with a cross appointment in the Department of Computer Science (U of T). He has been conducting research in the field of pervasive computing and intelligent systems in health for the past 15 years, having published over 150 journal papers, conference papers, and abstracts in this field. He has specifically focused on the development of intelligent home systems for elder care and wellness, technology for children with autism, and adaptive tools for nurses and clinical applications.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to partner institutions.

Registation / More Information:

A video archive for this particular session is not available. To view an archive of a similar session on this topic, presented on October 17, 2012 by WestGrid's University of Manitoba Site Lead, Jonatan Aronsson, please click on the YouTube link provided.

Speaker Info
Roman Baranowski
Site Lead
University of British Columbia
Description

This session will provide attendees with a step-by-step tutorial on using WestGrid machines, including demonstrations of how to log in, submit jobs, move data, troubleshoot, etc. This will be an introductory-level session, covering the basics of getting started and providing tips for efficient and effective use of the machines. WestGrid Support Personnel will be on-hand at each site to answer more advanced questions attendees may have.

 

** Please note, a video archive for this particular session is not available. To review an archive of a similar session on this topic, presented on October 17, 2012 by WestGrid's University of Manitoba Site Lead, Jonatan Aronsson, please view the YouTube video below.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Brian Corrie
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

This session provides attendees with a step-by-step tutorial on using WestGrid resources for the visualization of scientific data. The talk will discuss the visualization software that is available for use on WestGrid computational resources and how to use this software remotely from your desktop. In particular, the presentation will cover the use of the Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) on parallel.westgrid.ca for remote visualization of large data sets.

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Sheelagh Carpendale
Professor, Department of Computer Science
University of Calgary
Description

Abstract

Modern society demands that people manage, communicate, and interact with digital information at an ever-increasing pace. Even though most people want to be informed, all this information is frequently experienced as stress. It is not the information itself that is the problem, but the manner in which we are bombarded with information in forms that are often hard to interpret. How then can we produce interactive visualizations of digital data in a manner that enhances people's cognitive abilities? Ideally, these visualizations would not only present information visually and aesthetically, but provide people with capabilities for manipulating and exploring this information.

A good visualization provokes interpretation, exploration and appreciation, inviting direct interaction that reveals the data. This sets the stage for my over-arching research goal - to design, develop, and evaluate interactive visualizations so that they support the everyday practices of how people view, represent, manage, and interact with information. To this end, I have followed four intertwined themes: process, presentation, representation, and interaction.

My research process convolves art, science, and design practices, and has become a topic of research in itself. Presentation is the act of displaying visuals, emphasizing and organizing areas of interest. Representation is development of accurate and revealing data-to-visual mappings. And interaction is the key to exploration and manipulation capabilities that can make information comprehension viable. In this talk, I will show how each theme is opening up to indicate exciting new directions and discuss how the currently shifting information climate is opening up new opportunities.


About the speaker:

Sheelagh Carpendale is a Professor in Computer Science at the University of Calgary where she holds a Canada Research Chair in Information Visualization and NSERC/AITF/SMART Technologies Industrial Research Chair in Interactive Technologies. She leads the Innovations in Visualization (InnoVis) Research Group and has initiated the new interdisciplinary graduate- level specialization, Computational Media Design.

Her research on information visualization, large interactive displays, and new media draws on her dual background in Computer Science (BSc. and Ph.D. Simon Fraser University) and Visual Arts (Sheridan College, School of Design and Emily Carr, College of Art). She has just been awarded a NSERC STEACIE Memorial Fellowship in recognition of her outstanding research.

She is an internationally renowned leader in both information visualization and multi-touch tabletop interaction and has recently served in such roles as Papers, Program, or Conference Chair for IEEE InfoVis, and ACM Tabletop and has received both the IEEE and ACM recognition of service awards.

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Andriy Kovalenko
Adjunct Professor; Senior Research Officer at the National Institute for Nanotechnology
University of Alberta
Description

Andriy Kovalenko is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Alberta and a Senior Research Officer at the National Institute for Nanotechnology. His research focuses on (i) developing fundamental methodology of multiscale theory, modeling and simulation, capable of predicting the behaviour of complex nanomaterials and nanosystems, and (ii) applying this predictive methodology to provide understanding and rational design of realistic systems and processes of crucial importance in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

An essential part of this multiscale methodology is statistical-mechanical, integral equation theory of molecular liquids, in particular, the three-dimensional (3D) molecular theory of solvation, also known as the three-dimensional reference interaction site model with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure relation (3D-RISM-KH). The multiscale methods he developed include the self-consistent field coupling of quantum chemistry methods (ab initio CASSCF, Kohn-Sham DFT, and Orbital-Free Embedded DFT) with 3D-RISM-KH for nanochemistry, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and nanocatalysis in solution, at solid-liquid interfaces, and in nanoporous materials; 3D-RISM-KH based protein-ligand docking algorithms; milti-time-step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of biomolecules steered by solvation forces obtained from 3D-RISM-KH for function-related solvation, folding, misfolding, aggregation, interaction, and bioadsorption of proteins and other biomolecular and hybrid nanosystems in solution. In this talk, Dr. Kovalenko will discuss how WestGrid and Compute Canada - Calcul Canada resources support and advance those investigations.

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Doug Phillips
Senior Computational Science Consultant
University of Calgary
Description

MATLAB is a general-purpose high-level programming package that is available for use on WestGrid. It is typically used for numerical work such as linear algebra, but, has many add-on toolboxes to extend its capabilities into discipline-specific areas. Although MATLAB is probably used most often on researchers' desktops as an interactive program through its desktop graphical user interface, that is not the primary way it is used in the batch-oriented WestGrid environment.

This talk will cover the various ways in which MATLAB can be run on WestGrid systems, as determined by the restrictions imposed by licensing considerations. In particular, the use of the MATLAB compiler to create standalone applications will be illustrated. The compiled applications can then be run in normal WestGrid batch jobs.

Note that the talk will not cover MATLAB programming. Instead, it is intended for researchers who would like to run their own MATLAB code on WestGrid, but, are unsure of how to get started with doing so. Most of the material for the talk is drawn from the MATLAB pages on the WestGrid web site at http://www.westgrid.ca/support/software/matlab.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Patrick O'Leary
Director of Operations
WestGrid
Description

Interested in expanding HPC use within your research? Not sure where to begin? This introductory session will provide an overview of the WestGrid and Compute Canada resource structures, as well as walk through the basics of getting started with an account.

Any faculty members and graduate students interested in or curious about using HPC are invited to attend. WestGrid Support Personnel will be on-hand at each site to answer any specific introductory questions attendees may have.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Falk Herwig
Associate Professor
University of Victoria
Description

In this session, Falk Herwig, Associate Professor, Astronomy and Physics at the University of Victoria, will explain how he is using WestGrid / Compute Canada resources to perform complex 3D simulations to study astrophysical fluid dynamics.

This kind of research requires above average HPC cycles, which Herwig has accessed through WestGrid / Compute Canada's Resource Allocation process. He will provide an overview of his research, explain how he gained access to and used WestGrid machines to support that research, and highlight some of the key outcomes achieved as a result.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Todd Zimmerman
Collaboration Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

Scientific research is rapidly becoming a global endeavour. Today's complex computational problems not only require a wide range of technologies to solve them, but they also require a wide range of expertise which often means distributed research teams, sometimes spread around the world. This session will provide a comprehensive overview of WestGrid's advanced collaboration facilities, which are located at 15 partner institutions across Western Canada and can be used to connect with colleagues across the province, country and overseas. WestGrid Collaboration Staff will showcase recent upgrades, discuss room capabilities, and demonstrate applications within a research environment.

Date:
Wednesday, November 3, 2010 - 19:30 MDT to Wednesday, November 10, 2010 - 21:30 MST
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Gurpreet Singh
Post Doctoral Fellow, Department of Biological Sciences
University of Calgary
Description

This introductory seminar will provide an overview of the most commonly used computational tools for studying biomolecules, mainly focusing on potential energy function and its evaluation, general molecular dynamic simulation algorithm, and current methods for free energy calculations implemented in molecular simulation package GROMACS. From the early use of computers to study various aspects of liquids and gases by modeling them as hard spheres, computer simulations now days are routinely used to study dynamics of complex molecules such as proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and lipid membranes.

Computer simulations have became a useful tool in understanding the dynamics and mechanism of function of these molecules with atomistic details. New sampling methods coupled with increased computational resources have made it possible to simulate the folding of small peptides and proteins. The underlying parameters or force-fields used in atomistic representation have matured to the point that free energies calculated using computer simulations methods are in quantitative agreements with experiments.

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Pierre Boulanger
Professor, Department of Computing Science
University of Alberta
Description

By exploiting our visual abilities, traditional scientific visualization aims at offering engineers and scientists various ways to assist them at exploring complex phenomenon. What Virtual Reality (VR) technologies has to offer is to put an expert user at the center of the exploration process that utilise not only his visual abilities but also his multi-sensory senses such as touch and sound.

To improve the effectiveness of the traditional data exploration process, many researchers has focused on the development of more intuitive interaction techniques that exploits the sensory-motor capacity of humans to deal with complex environments. To achieve this goal two conditions need to be respected. First, exploitation of different modalities must not oppose one another, and each sensory channel must be rendered in a way that fits with human abilities.

During this talk, I will explore how VR can create a true multi-sensory interface by using high-resolution displays, haptics, and sound. We will explore the current state of the art and discuss our implementation for a virtual wind tunnel application and the exploration of medical data.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating partner institutions.

Registation / More Information:

rsvp@westgrid.ca (please indicate at which location you will be attending)

Speaker Info
Dr. Ryan D'Arcy
Professor and BC Leadership Chair, Head Medical Technologies, Faculty of Applied Sciences
Simon Fraser University
Description

This session will host Dr. Ryan D'Arcy, Professor with Simon Fraser University's School of Computing Science, for a presentation that explores the opportunities around embedding new computational tools into front-line clinical environments.

Functional brain imaging enables non-invasive windows into how, when, and where the brain is actively processing information. This technology advances not only create the ability to improve diagnosis and treatment in people immediately, but also generate incredibly rich and complex data. Data we are just now beginning to unlock the potential around in terms of real world applications in the clinical environment.

This talk will review some core functional imaging technologies (functional MRI, electro- and magneto- encephalography) and highlight applications in presurgical mapping for brain tumours/epilepsy, diagnostic evaluation in brain injury, and rehabilitative monitoring during neuroplastic recovery.

 

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Stan Matwin
Professor, Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
Description

Abstract: 

In this talk, we will review some of the recent applied text mining work at Dalhousie. We will argue the need for a text representation that would be more linguistically informed than the standard vector model. We will present one such proposal, in which a co-occurrence model takes into account the distribution of words throughout the corpus. We will then show how this representation is successfully applied in the task of categorizing dream descriptions by their emotional valuation (joint work with J. De Koninck and A. Razavi, Ottawa). We will round up the talk with our experience with some of the other text mining techniques used in the analysis of the twitter traffic in the 2012 presidential elections in France and in the US (joint work with LIRMM, France).

About the Speaker: 

Stan Matwin is a Professor and Canada Research Chair at Dalhousie University, and a Distinguished Professor at the University of Ottawa (on leave). Fellow of ECCAI and CAIAC and an Ontario Champion of Innovation. Internationally recognized for his work in text mining and in applications of Machine Learning, member of Editorial Boards of the leading journals in Machine Learning and Data Mining. Stan Matwin is one of the founders of Distil Interactive Inc. and Devera Logic Inc., and has significant experience and interest in innovation and technology transfer.

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Brian Fisher
Associate Professor, School of Interactive Arts and Technology
Simon Fraser University
Description

Abstract:

This talk explores the larger implications of visual analytics-- "the science of analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces"-- for cognitive science and informatics. I will argue that the methods that will advance this new science go beyond those of natural science and engineering, and will require researchers to create a new translational cognitive science of analytic systems. We will begin by building field study methods that characterize human and computational cognitive capabilities as they are used for decision-making in a range of situations. Because findings from field methods do not generalize well, we must then investigate these proposed capabilities in the laboratory.

Finally, we must build mathematical and computational theories that predict the impact of changes in technology on cognitive processes in technology-rich environments. These methods will only suffice until processing capacity reduces the lag between an analyst's query and a graphical response to a certain level. When the response is generated at the same pace as the sequence of cognitive operations that the analyst performs, human and computational processes become "close coupled". At this point the distinction between processes originating from the mind of the analyst (i.e. a mental representation) versus the computer (i.e. a visualization) become impossible to determine, and the subsystems we will study will seamlessly incorporate natural and artificial processes.

About the Speaker:

I have built upon my early training in the experimental investigation of human cognitive processes to develop a program of translational research bridging cognitive science and the design of interactive visualization systems. My goal is to advance new theories and research methods for understanding how highly interactive visual information systems can support “close-coupling” of human and computational processes for improved performance in cognitive tasks such as situation analysis, decision-making, creativity, and collaboration in situations ranging from emergency management to aircraft safety, computer-aided design, security administration, and computer-supported learning.

Central to all of these projects is the emerging cognitive systems science that advances current research on cognitive style, expert cognition and skilled perceptuomotor performance to adapt information technology to individual capabilities. Together with field research and “pair analytics” translational methods, this core of laboratory research provides a knowledge-based approach to the design and customization of information systems and their integration in organizational processes.

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Jeremy Kerr
Professor, Department of Biology
University of Ottawa
Description

The combined effects of habitat loss and proliferation of introduced species present serious conservation challenges. These aspects of global change have created a black hole for species in Canada and globally, pulling many toward extinction. Human activities have added climate change to this dangerous mix. Recent research improves capacity to predict species impacts of such effects. Species losses can erode the robust provision of economically and ecologically indispensable ecosystem services, like pollination. In the past 25 years, several wild pollinator species have nearly totally collapsed in North America.

Although habitat loss, introduced diseases, and pesticide use have not helped, we present new evidence that climate change alone could explain some bumblebee losses. Massive increases in weather extremes can precipitate species collapses, even among widespread, abundant insect pollinators. These effects, known from the paleoecological record, have not previously been linked to a modern extinction. Further losses of species and ecosystem service degradation are not inevitable. Informed by concerted scientific action and an involved public, elected leaders sometimes take landmark steps to conserve wilderness areas and strengthen legal frameworks protecting species at risk.

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Mark Jaccard
Professor, School of Resource and Environmental ManagementComputer Science
Simon Fraser University
Description

From the research of natural scientists, Al Gore talks of an inconvenient truth: that human's are heating the planet, especially by burning fossil fuels to emit carbon pollution. But from the research of social scientists, we know of a second inconvenient truth: that human's are prone to delude themselves and others about real-world evidence because of self-interest, convenience and preference, and this is preventing us from effective action to minimize climate change. The effort to stop global warming is frustrated by an array of delusions in which evidence is ignored or fabricated.

Even worse, it is not just climate science skeptics who do this. Even people who want action on climate change ignore evidence and sustain delusions that prevent effective action. This includes people who believe that peak oil is imminent, that energy efficiency is cheap and easy, that behavioral change is necessary and effective, that renewables can soon outcompete fossil fuels, that carbon offsets lead to carbon neutrality, and that a global agreement can be reached by voluntary consensus. This talk explains why leading social science researchers know that these are delusions, and more importantly what to do in order to act in time to prevent massive species extinctions and major human costs.

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Rick Routledge
Professor, Department of Statistics
Simon Fraser University
Description

The speaker will present his perspective on the tumultuous events that followed his receipt last fall of a report of positive test results for the infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAv) in Rivers Inlet sockeye salmon. The account will include the immediate reaction, subsequent revelations, and results from follow-up sampling.

The story will highlight instances of what the speaker views as a serious disregard for the role of scientific evidence in the development of governmental policy - and consequent, unacceptable risks to wild Pacific salmon. The presentation will conclude with a proposal for organizational reform aimed at promoting the role of scientific research in the protection of wild Pacific salmon.

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Jake Rice
Scientist
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Description

The talk will commence with setting a background for science-based marine policy-making. The first background component is a review of the standard principles (platitudes?) about the role of science in policy-making generically. The review will consider both why each principle is considered important and the implications of each one for dynamics of science advisory processes and interactions between science advisors and policy makers.

The other component of the context for this talk will be a review of the meaning of sustainable use/development in natural resource management and policy. These two components of the context for science - policy interface will be brought together with a brief discussion of what "integration" means in policy-making and the science advice which supports it.

The talk will move on to the special challenges of policy-making in marine environments, considering both areas within national jurisdictions and areas beyond national jurisdiction. It will develop the thesis that drivers of marine policy making have a strong top-down nature. Broad commitments regarding conservation and sustainable use and development are made in very high-level fora such as Rio (1992), Johannesburg (2002), and Rio+20 (2012). These become translated into paragraphs of greater specificity in a pair of annual UN General Assembly Resolutions on Sustainable Fisheries and on Ocean and Law of the Sea.

Once commitments are adopted at the UN level, the major UN intergovernmental agencies such as the Food and Agriculture Organization and the Convention on Biological Diversity, take over developing implementation frameworks for use by Parties and sectors. These frameworks are finally taken up at the national level within national jurisdictions, and in complex governance arrangements in areas beyond national jurisdiction, and implemented with policies, regulations, and occasionally even legislation.

At every stage in this top-down process science advice is needed. However, the nature of the science advice changes at each stage, as do the dynamics of the science-policy interface. The fact that below the very highest level, the conversion of broad commitments to specific policies and practices occurs in two parallel streams - a fisheries sectoral governance stream and a biodiversity conservation governance stream, poses more challenges than just duplication of effort.

Many of the warts hiding in the principles and platitudes of how the science-policy interface works, and the nature of science advice itself, become revealed in how these two streams play out in parallel, each striving for implementation of common commitments, but each with different histories and different features. The talk will illustrate those "challenges" in the science-policy interface with specific examples such as "ecologically and biologically significant areas" and "vulnerable marine ecosystems".

The wrap-up of the talk will consider whether the marine science-policy process is just a flawed divergence from the idealized science-policy interface, or if the imperfections in the marine science-policy process are in fact ways that the real world differs from an abstract and imaginary ideal.

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Finn Donnelly and Kennedy Stewart
Members of Parliament
Description

Donnelly:

Two of the strongest environmental laws in the country, the Fisheries Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, were significantly altered with the recent passing of the federal omnibus budget bill. Join us for a discussion about the ramifications for Canada's fishery and our natural environment.

Stewart:

Where every country needs a national science policy to further scientific advancement, there is an inherent tension between scientific practice and government science policy. Both the natural and social sciences require researchers be free to ask questions and employ scientific tools such as peer-review to discover answers. However as science almost always requires public funding, governments will always attempt to steer scientific endeavor to meet political objectives.

With this in mind, any national science policy needs to find the right balance between funding levels and the extent to which government controls the scientific agenda. This presentation more fully outlines this tension and explains the institutions and players found in the current Canadian science ecosystem. It then moves to explain recent changes to Canada's approach to science, using current changes to the National Research Council as an example. The goal of this presentation is to generate discussion as to the future direction of Canada's National Science Policy.

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Bojan Mohar
Professor and Canada Research Chair, Department of Mathematics
Simon Fraser University
Description

In 1994, Carsten Thomassen published a beautiful simple proof confirming that every planar graph is 5-list-colourable. Another beautiful proof on a similar topic was given a few years later by Mike Albertson who proved that every precolouring of a set of vertices in a planar graph that are far apart from each other can be extended to a 5-colouring of the whole graph. After presenting these enlightening contributions, the speaker will discuss possible common generalizations of these results and report on some recent progress.

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Robie Macdonald
Scientist
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Description

During the past three decades the Arctic has been undergoing unprecedented change due to global warming. In addition to stress brought on by warming, the inhabitants of the Arctic are exposed to industrial and agricultural contaminants that have arrived there via air and water.

I will examine some of the interactions between climate change/variability and contaminants mainly with the view of showing the need for understanding linkages between system components before proposing action. Interactions make it exceptionally difficult to isolate the consequences of these two sorts of stresses.

Finally, I will look at the processes by which issue-oriented science gets funded and some of the problems we face as a society in using the resultant science to prioritize action through policy.

Date:
Location

The Banff Centre
Banff, AB

Registation / More Information:

http://www.cybera.ca/news-and-events/cyber-summit/

Speaker Info
Description

This two-day event, taking place November 27-28, 2013, in Banff, AB, will feature international keynote speakers describing the potential of technologies — such as cloud computing — and how innovation can come from the most unexpected places.

Parallel session tracks will be devoted to educators and entrepreneurs. These two groups will receive specialized tips and guidance on IT operations: from data management and regulations, to cloud computing, to human resource management. A hands-on workshop will build expertise on high-speed networking.

The Cyber Summit will appeal to Alberta entrepreneurs, educators and IT decision makers.

Date:
Location

ICT618B
University of Calgary

Registation / More Information:

http://www.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/node/2333

Speaker Info
Zamir Martins Filho
Description

Occlusion is one of the major challenges in 3D grids. In this thesis we present different approaches to tackle the problem of occlusion in 3D grids. In order to visualize occluded objects some techniques remove a portion of the remaining grid (the occluding part) while others keep all the data exposing the occluded objects by splitting and shifting the remaining grid. In this work we propose the use of the Cutaway Views technique to improve the inspection and analysis of grid cells in Corner-Point grids, and we also present a system for creating interactive Exploded View Diagrams in generalized 3D grids.

Date:
Thursday, October 31, 2013 - 2:00 MDT to Friday, November 1, 2013 - 0:30 MDT
Location

University of Alberta

Registation / More Information:

http://www.science.ualberta.ca/water2013#sthash.5GI4rvJp.dpuf

Speaker Info
Description

A symposium to celebrate the lifetime achievements of David W. Schindler, OC, AOE, DPhil., FRSC, FRS

Please join us as we celebrate Dr. David W. Schindler’s internationally acclaimed career. Together with his colleagues and former students — Canada’s most prominent luminaries in the science of water ecology — we will mark his legacy and consider how science can continue to guide sound public water policy in the 21st Century.

Wednesday, October 30
Public lecture: Dr. David Suzuki, CC, OBC, PhD
The Global Ecological Crisis: Setting the Real Bottom Line
Myer Horowitz Theatre, University of Alberta
7:00 pm

Thursday, October 31
Free public symposium and concluding panel discussion 
L1-490 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy (ECHA)
9:00 am - 5:30 pm

Date:
Location

Metro at the Garneau Cinema
Edmonton, AB

Registation / More Information:

http://www.aihealthsolutions.ca/sitc/

Speaker Info
Elaine Hyshka
MA
University of Alberta
Description

Movies are often based on strange and fantastic science, leaving the audience to wonder how much of what they are seeing is possible and how much is simply fiction. Enter the Alberta Innovates - Health Solution (AIHS) "Science in the Cinema" program, an initiative to help illuminate the science in popular cinema and provide a venue for the general public to learn about current research. Science in the Cinema provides FREE screenings (free popcorn included) of selected movies related to health or biomedical issues.

A researcher who works in a related field introduces each film. Following the presentation, the researcher discusses new areas of research related to the science highlighted in the movie with time for audience questions and discussion.

*  *  *  *  *

Flight
An airline pilot saves almost all his passengers on his malfunctioning airliner which eventually crashed, but an investigation into the accident reveals something troubling.

Director: Robert Zemeckis
Stars: Denzel Washington, Nadine Velazquez, Don Cheadle

Date:
Location

Metro at the Garneau Cinema
Edmonton, AB

Registation / More Information:

http://www.aihealthsolutions.ca/sitc/

Speaker Info
Dr. Dominic Allain
Description

Movies are often based on strange and fantastic science, leaving the audience to wonder how much of what they are seeing is possible and how much is simply fiction. Enter the Alberta Innovates - Health Solution (AIHS) "Science in the Cinema" program, an initiative to help illuminate the science in popular cinema and provide a venue for the general public to learn about current research. Science in the Cinema provides FREE screenings (free popcorn included) of selected movies related to health or biomedical issues.

A researcher who works in a related field introduces each film. Following the presentation, the researcher discusses new areas of research related to the science highlighted in the movie with time for audience questions and discussion.

*  *  *  *  *

Salud
A timely examination of human values and the health issues that affect us all, ¡Salud! looks at the curious case of Cuba, a cash-strapped country with what the BBC calls ‘one of the world’s best health systems.’ From the shores of Africa to the Americas, !Salud! hits the road with some of the 28,000 Cuban health professionals serving in 68 countries, and explores the hearts and minds of international medical students in Cuba -- now numbering 30,000, including nearly 100 from the USA. Their stories plus testimony from experts around the world bring home the competing agendas that mark the battle for global health—and the complex realities confronting the movement to make healthcare everyone’s birth right.

Date:
Location

The Globe Cinema
Calgary, AB

Registation / More Information:

http://www.aihealthsolutions.ca/sitc/

Speaker Info
Dr. Jennifer Hatfield
Description

Movies are often based on strange and fantastic science, leaving the audience to wonder how much of what they are seeing is possible and how much is simply fiction. Enter the Alberta Innovates - Health Solution (AIHS) "Science in the Cinema" program, an initiative to help illuminate the science in popular cinema and provide a venue for the general public to learn about current research. Science in the Cinema provides FREE screenings (free popcorn included) of selected movies related to health or biomedical issues.

A researcher who works in a related field introduces each film. Following the presentation, the researcher discusses new areas of research related to the science highlighted in the movie with time for audience questions and discussion.

 

Film: Salud
A timely examination of human values and the health issues that affect us all, ¡Salud! looks at the curious case of Cuba, a cash-strapped country with what the BBC calls ‘one of the world’s best health systems.’ From the shores of Africa to the Americas, !Salud! hits the road with some of the 28,000 Cuban health professionals serving in 68 countries, and explores the hearts and minds of international medical students in Cuba -- now numbering 30,000, including nearly 100 from the USA. Their stories plus testimony from experts around the world bring home the competing agendas that mark the battle for global health—and the complex realities confronting the movement to make healthcare everyone’s birth right.

Date:
Wednesday, November 20, 2013 - 8:00 EST to Friday, November 22, 2013 - 8:00 EST
Location

Toronto, ON

Registation / More Information:

http://www.cspc2013.ca

Speaker Info
Description

The Canadian Science Policy Conference (CSPC) was founded in 2008 by a diverse group of young and passionate professionals from industry, academia, and science-based governmental departments. CSPC serves as an inclusive, non-partisan and national forum uniting stakeholders, strengthening dialogue, and enabling action with respect to current and emerging issues in national science, technology, and innovation policy.


CSPC has a mind-blowing program set for this year's conference. There are a diverse range of panels, speakers, issues and discussions in the 2013 program. With more than 150 speakers on 26 sessions across five themes of the conference, we definitely have something for you.


CSPC 2013 Themes:

  • Emerging Trends in International Trade and Diplomacy: The Role of Science and Technology
  • Private Sector R&D and Innovation: New Realities and Models
  • Communicating Science and Technology
  • Graduate Studies and Research Training: Prospects in a Changing Environment
  • Emerging Issues in Canadian Science Policy
Date:
Location

Room 2C14
University of Winnipeg

Registation / More Information:

http://www.uwinnipeg.ca/index/siteevent-details-action/id.1886/title.red-talks-the-emerging-energy-series-biomass-district-heating-increasing-manitoba-s-use-of-renewable-resources

Speaker Info
Description

*RED refers to: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency and Demand Reduction

Biomass District Heating, Increasing Manitoba’s Use of Renewable Resources
Join Daniel Lepp Friesen in the inaugural RED Talk to begin an ongoing dialogue about practical new energy solutions for Manitoba. In this talk, Daniel will discuss the principles of district heating with biomass, examples from Sweden and Denmark and outline possible applications in Manitoba. Daniel has been working in the field of renewable energy since the early 80’s and provides technical and financial feasibility services for energy projects.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating partner institutions.

Registation / More Information:

rsvp@westgrid.ca

(please indicate at which location you will be attending)

Speaker Info
Patrick Mann
Manager, Technical Operations
WestGrid
Description

This session was previously delivered on October 09, 2013 but is being repeated again for any users who missed it. It is a popular session as it provides attendees with a step-by-step tutorial on using WestGrid machines, including demonstrations of how to log in, submit jobs, move data, and troubleshoot problems. This will be an introductory-level session, covering the basics of getting started with a focus on job scheduling techniques.

WestGrid support personnel will be on-hand at each site to answer more advanced questions attendees may have.

To attend in person, please RSVP.

Date:
Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 7:00 ADT to Friday, June 27, 2014 - 7:00 ADT
Location

Westin Nova Scotian

Registation / More Information:

http://2014.hpcs.ca

Speaker Info
Description

The High Performance Computing Symposium (HPCS) is a multi-disciplinary conference that is considered Canada’s premier supercomputing forum. Each year, researchers, analysts and IT professionals from academia and industry gather to exchange the ideas, tools and new discoveries that are driving today's innovations in computational research.

HPCS 2014 is being co-hosted by ACEnet and Compute Canada and will feature a full program of pre-conference workshops, discussion panels, paper sessions, networking opportunites and plenary speakers.

Date:
Friday, November 22, 2013 - 8:00 MST to Sunday, November 24, 2013 - 8:00 MST
Location

Edmonton, AB

Registation / More Information:

http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs125/1105231689127/archive/1115510120178.html

Speaker Info
Description

We're having a hackathon and we need you!

Hacking Health is an innovative, 21st century approach to developing solutions for health care problems. If you are a clinician, healthcare professional, developer, designer or researcher you have skills and insights the healthcare system needs. Whether you've identified a problem, or have the expertise to find a solution, we need you.

As a Hacking Health participant you will work on a team for one intense, highly-focused weekend to create digital health care solutions. Don't want to participate for the full three days? We are also looking for people with technical, business or healthcare expertise to help mentor teams throughout the weekend. Contact us to find out more.

Date:
Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 8:00 MST to Monday, February 17, 2014 - 8:00 MST
Location

Chicago, IL

Registation / More Information:

http://meetings.aaas.org

Speaker Info
Description

This annual event is one of the most widely recognized global science gatherings, with hundreds of diverse scientific sessions and communication opportunities with broad U.S. and international media coverage.

This year’s theme — Meeting Global Challenges: Discovery and Innovation — will focus on finding sustainable solutions through inclusive, international, and interdisciplinary efforts that are most useful to society and enhance economic growth. The scientific program will highlight the increasing interdependence of economic progress and advances in science and technology.

Everyone is welcome at the AAAS Annual Meeting. Those who attend will have the opportunity to choose among a broad range of activities, including plenary and topical lectures by some of the world’s leading scientists and engineers, multidisciplinary symposia, cutting-edge seminars, career development workshops, and an international exhibition.

Date:
Location

EOW 430, Room 430, Engineering Office Wing, University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:

https://computecanada.ca/researcher-consultation

Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada (CC) is undertaking an extensive consultation process to develop a strategic plan to direct its activities over the next five years, 2014 - 2019. This Town Hall session is being held to gather feedback from the local research community. 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

An executive summary and an overview of a draft strategic plan has been created for attendees to review before the Town Hall Meetings. Discussions at these sessions will be structured around the following questions:

  • What is the most significant gap or problem in the delivery of advanced computing in Canada? 
  • What is the most important thing that CC should do during its next mandate? 
  • What are the particular challenges CC will face in achieving its proposed goals? 
  • Are we being sufficiently forward looking? What is missing?

Online Town Hall Session

An online Town Hall will also be hosted on December 10 at 11:00 am EST using Vidyo videoconferencing technology. Participants can connect by phone at 1-855-728-4677 extension 5547, or download the Vidyo desktop software to participate via videoconference. Once you've  installed the Vidyo software, visit https://computecanada.ca/video-consultation to connect.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Written Feedback

If you are unable to participate in one of the Town Hall sessions or if you have additional feedback to share following a Town Hall session, you can also email your feedback to consultation@computecanada.ca.

More Information

To register for a Town Hall session, or for more information on the overall consultation and strategic planning processes, please visit the CC website.

Date:
Location

ANGUS 254, 2053 Main Mall Henry Angus Building, University of British Columbia

Registation / More Information:

https://computecanada.ca/researcher-consultation

Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada (CC) is undertaking an extensive consultation process to develop a strategic plan to direct its activities over the next five years, 2014 - 2019. This Town Hall session is being held to gather feedback from the local research community. 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

An executive summary and an overview of a draft strategic plan has been created for attendees to review before the Town Hall Meetings. Discussions at these sessions will be structured around the following questions:

  • What is the most significant gap or problem in the delivery of advanced computing in Canada? 
  • What is the most important thing that CC should do during its next mandate? 
  • What are the particular challenges CC will face in achieving its proposed goals? 
  • Are we being sufficiently forward looking? What is missing?

Online Town Hall Session

An online Town Hall will also be hosted on December 10 at 11:00 am EST using Vidyo videoconferencing technology. Participants can connect by phone at 1-855-728-4677 extension 5547, or download the Vidyo desktop software to participate via videoconference. Once you've  installed the Vidyo software, visit https://computecanada.ca/video-consultation to connect.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Written Feedback

If you are unable to participate in one of the Town Hall sessions or if you have additional feedback to share following a Town Hall session, you can also email your feedback to consultation@computecanada.ca.

More Information

To register for a Town Hall session, or for more information on the overall consultation and strategic planning processes, please visit the CC website.

Date:
Location

Blusson Hall 10021, Simon Fraser University

Registation / More Information:

https://computecanada.ca/researcher-consultation

Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada (CC) is undertaking an extensive consultation process to develop a strategic plan to direct its activities over the next five years, 2014 - 2019. This Town Hall session is being held to gather feedback from the local research community. 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

An executive summary and an overview of a draft strategic plan has been created for attendees to review before the Town Hall Meetings. Discussions at these sessions will be structured around the following questions:

  • What is the most significant gap or problem in the delivery of advanced computing in Canada? 
  • What is the most important thing that CC should do during its next mandate? 
  • What are the particular challenges CC will face in achieving its proposed goals? 
  • Are we being sufficiently forward looking? What is missing?

Online Town Hall Session

An online Town Hall will also be hosted on December 10 at 11:00 am EST using Vidyo videoconferencing technology. Participants can connect by phone at 1-855-728-4677 extension 5547, or download the Vidyo desktop software to participate via videoconference. Once you've  installed the Vidyo software, visit https://computecanada.ca/video-consultation to connect.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Written Feedback

If you are unable to participate in one of the Town Hall sessions or if you have additional feedback to share following a Town Hall session, you can also email your feedback to consultation@computecanada.ca.

More Information

To register for a Town Hall session, or for more information on the overall consultation and strategic planning processes, please visit the CC website.

Date:
Location

St. John's College 108 (Cross Common Room), University of Manitoba

Registation / More Information:

https://computecanada.ca/researcher-consultation

Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada (CC) is undertaking an extensive consultation process to develop a strategic plan to direct its activities over the next five years, 2014 - 2019. This Town Hall session is being held to gather feedback from the local research community. 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

An executive summary and an overview of a draft strategic plan has been created for attendees to review before the Town Hall Meetings. Discussions at these sessions will be structured around the following questions:

  • What is the most significant gap or problem in the delivery of advanced computing in Canada? 
  • What is the most important thing that CC should do during its next mandate? 
  • What are the particular challenges CC will face in achieving its proposed goals? 
  • Are we being sufficiently forward looking? What is missing?

Online Town Hall Session

An online Town Hall will also be hosted on December 10 at 11:00 am EST using Vidyo videoconferencing technology. Participants can connect by phone at 1-855-728-4677 extension 5547, or download the Vidyo desktop software to participate via videoconference. Once you've  installed the Vidyo software, visit https://computecanada.ca/video-consultation to connect.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Written Feedback

If you are unable to participate in one of the Town Hall sessions or if you have additional feedback to share following a Town Hall session, you can also email your feedback to consultation@computecanada.ca.

More Information

To register for a Town Hall session, or for more information on the overall consultation and strategic planning processes, please visit the CC website.

Date:
Location

Room 2D71, Agriculture Building, University of Saskatchewan

Registation / More Information:

https://computecanada.ca/researcher-consultation

Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada (CC) is undertaking an extensive consultation process to develop a strategic plan to direct its activities over the next five years, 2014 - 2019. This Town Hall session is being held to gather feedback from the local research community. 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

An executive summary and an overview of a draft strategic plan has been created for attendees to review before the Town Hall Meetings. Discussions at these sessions will be structured around the following questions:

  • What is the most significant gap or problem in the delivery of advanced computing in Canada? 
  • What is the most important thing that CC should do during its next mandate? 
  • What are the particular challenges CC will face in achieving its proposed goals? 
  • Are we being sufficiently forward looking? What is missing?

Online Town Hall Session

An online Town Hall will also be hosted on December 10 at 11:00 am EST using Vidyo videoconferencing technology. Participants can connect by phone at 1-855-728-4677 extension 5547, or download the Vidyo desktop software to participate via videoconference. Once you've  installed the Vidyo software, visit https://computecanada.ca/video-consultation to connect.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Written Feedback

If you are unable to participate in one of the Town Hall sessions or if you have additional feedback to share following a Town Hall session, you can also email your feedback to consultation@computecanada.ca.

More Information

To register for a Town Hall session, or for more information on the overall consultation and strategic planning processes, please visit the CC website.

Date:
Location

Room 3-33, Computing Sciences Centre (CSC), University of Alberta

Registation / More Information:

https://computecanada.ca/researcher-consultation

Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada (CC) is undertaking an extensive consultation process to develop a strategic plan to direct its activities over the next five years, 2014 - 2019. This Town Hall session is being held to gather feedback from the local research community. 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

An executive summary and an overview of a draft strategic plan has been created for attendees to review before the Town Hall Meetings. Discussions at these sessions will be structured around the following questions:

  • What is the most significant gap or problem in the delivery of advanced computing in Canada? 
  • What is the most important thing that CC should do during its next mandate? 
  • What are the particular challenges CC will face in achieving its proposed goals? 
  • Are we being sufficiently forward looking? What is missing?

Written Feedback

If you are unable to participate in one of the Town Hall sessions or if you have additional feedback to share following a Town Hall session, you can also email your feedback to consultation@computecanada.ca.

More Information

To register for a Town Hall session, or for more information on the overall consultation and strategic planning processes, please visit the CC website.

Date:
Location

ST 128, University of Calgary

Registation / More Information:

https://computecanada.ca/researcher-consultation

Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada (CC) is undertaking an extensive consultation process to develop a strategic plan to direct its activities over the next five years, 2014 - 2019. This Town Hall session is being held to gather feedback from the local research community. 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

An executive summary and an overview of a draft strategic plan has been created for attendees to review before the Town Hall Meetings. Discussions at these sessions will be structured around the following questions:

  • What is the most significant gap or problem in the delivery of advanced computing in Canada? 
  • What is the most important thing that CC should do during its next mandate? 
  • What are the particular challenges CC will face in achieving its proposed goals? 
  • Are we being sufficiently forward looking? What is missing?

Written Feedback

If you are unable to participate in one of the Town Hall sessions or if you have additional feedback to share following a Town Hall session, you can also email your feedback to consultation@computecanada.ca.

More Information

To register for a Town Hall session, or for more information on the overall consultation and strategic planning processes, please visit the CC website.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating institutions.
To attend in person, please RSVP and indicate at which location you will be attending.

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Arlene Astell
Community Management of Dementia and Associate Professor
University of Toronto
,
Uwe Glaesser
Professor of Computing Science and Associate Dean of Applied Science
Simon Fraser University
Description

Abstract: 

Working in partnership with end-users is the key to developing successful interventions for any population. With an ageing population it is particularly important to understand how people make decisions about purchase and adoption of novel technologies and the key factors that influence these decisions. In this C2C seminar we will discuss techniques developed to encourage seniors to share their views about novel technologies and how their needs influence their decision-making. We will also explore examples of how user needs can be modelled to improve understanding of accessibility and scalability. In collaboration with users, caregivers, industry partners and other stakeholder groups, we will devise a reference model specifying the principal user requirements and needs in terms of a service model to be defined in abstract computational terms. This service model is intended as the starting point for building a flexibly extensible framework for developing an ensemble of software services utilizing cloud computing and distributed communication networks.

About the Speakers:

Arlene Astell is inaugural Ontario Shores Research Chair in Community Management of Dementia and Associate Professor at the University of Toronto. She is also Professor of Health Services Research in the Centre for Assistive Technology and Connected Healthcare at the University of Sheffield, UK. Arlene’s research is concerned with developing and evaluating novel interventions to support people to live and age well, including creative applications of technology to early detection of change, maximizing spared abilities and minimizing impaired ones, and training caregivers about the impact of cognitive impairment on communication and relationships. Her work is highly cross-disciplinary and collaborative with embedded stakeholder participation informing all stages of the research and dissemination.

Uwe Glässser is Professor of Computing Science and Associate Dean of Applied Sciences at Simon Fraser University. Prior to his current appointment, he held academic positions at University of Paderborn, Germany, worked for the International Telecommunication Union, Geneva, and Microsoft Research, Redmond, WA. His work concentrates on applied computer science, spanning industrial applications of formal methods, software technology for intelligent systems, and computational criminology and security informatics. More recent work focuses on modeling of complex social systems: ambient assistive living, computer models in the study of crime and criminal network analysis.

Spring 2014 Series Theme:

The topic of the Spring 2014 Coast to Coast seminar series is "Technology for Aging Well" and it is built around a pan-Canadian project titled AGE-WELL (Aging Gracefully across Environments using Technology to Support Wellness, Engagement and Long Life.) The focus of the series will be a discussion how to use technology in helping support the Canadian aging population to ensure that all Canadians can grow older with dignity and grace.

One of the goals of AGE-WELL is to address socio-economic, ethical, and regulatory challenges related to the development and commercialization of technologies for aging. This includes generating new knowledge about the technology needs of older adults and their caregivers and creating and producing high-quality and sustainable health care solutions for older Canadians. Partners in AGE-WELL include the University Health Network, Simon Fraser University, IBM, Phillips Healtcare, and Fraser Health.

Coordinators of the series are Dr. Andrew Sixsmith, Director of the SFU Gerontology Research Centre and a Deputy Director of the IRMACS Centre, and Dr. Alex Mihailidis, the Barbara G. Stymiest Research Chair in Rehabilitation Technology at the University of Toronto and Toronto Rehab Institute.

The speakers in the series will speak from two perspectives:

  • The perspective of researchers that have successfully built and/or are in the process of building advanced technologies such as communications technologies, robotics, mobile networks, and artificial intelligence with aims to encourage increased independence and safety in the home and to support “aging in place”.
  • The perspective of researchers that have extensive experience within the area of health and quality of life of older people and the role of health and social care services.

This seminar series will be of interest to health and social scientists, engineers, and industry who are either carrying out and/or about to embark on development of innovative technology-based solutions that promote independence and healthy aging and optimize health care resource utilization.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating institutions.
To attend in person, please RSVP and indicate at which location you will be attending.

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Dr. Andrew Sixsmith
Director of the SFU Gerontology Research Centre and a Deputy Director of the IRMACS Centre
Simon Fraser University
,
Dr. Scott Lear
Professor, Faculty Health Sciences
Simon Fraser University
Description

Abstract:

Working in partnership with end-users is the key to developing successful interventions for any population. With an ageing population it is particularly important to understand how people make decisions about purchase and adoption of novel technologies and the key factors that influence these decisions. In this C2C seminar we will discuss techniques developed to encourage seniors to share their views about novel technologies and how their needs influence their decision-making. We will also explore examples of how user needs can be modelled to improve understanding of accessibility and scalability. In collaboration with users, caregivers, industry partners and other stakeholder groups, we will devise a reference model specifying the principal user requirements and needs in terms of a service model to be defined in abstract computational terms. This service model is intended as the starting point for building a flexibly extensible framework for developing an ensemble of software services utilizing cloud computing and distributed communication networks.

Spring 2014 Series Theme:

The topic of the Spring 2014 Coast to Coast seminar series is "Technology for Aging Well" and it is built around a pan-Canadian project titled AGE-WELL (Aging Gracefully across Environments using Technology to Support Wellness, Engagement and Long Life.) The focus of the series will be a discussion how to use technology in helping support the Canadian aging population to ensure that all Canadians can grow older with dignity and grace.

One of the goals of AGE-WELL is to address socio-economic, ethical, and regulatory challenges related to the development and commercialization of technologies for aging. This includes generating new knowledge about the technology needs of older adults and their caregivers and creating and producing high-quality and sustainable health care solutions for older Canadians. Partners in AGE-WELL include the University Health Network, Simon Fraser University, IBM, Phillips Healthcare, and Fraser Health.

Coordinators of the series are Dr. Andrew Sixsmith, Director of the SFU Gerontology Research Centre and a Deputy Director of the IRMACS Centre, and Dr. Alex Mihailidis, the Barbara G. Stymiest Research Chair in Rehabilitation Technology at the University of Toronto and Toronto Rehab Institute.

The speakers in the series will speak from two perspectives:

  • The perspective of researchers that have successfully built and/or are in the process of building advanced technologies such as communications technologies, robotics, mobile networks, and artificial intelligence with aims to encourage increased independence and safety in the home and to support “aging in place”.
  • The perspective of researchers that have extensive experience within the area of health and quality of life of older people and the role of health and social care services.

This seminar series will be of interest to health and social scientists, engineers, and industry who are either carrying out and/or about to embark on development of innovative technology-based solutions that promote independence and healthy aging and optimize healthcare resource utilization.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating institutions.
To attend in person, please RSVP no later than 24 hours in advance of the session and indicate at which location you will be attending.

Registation / More Information:

RSVP: rsvp@westgrid.ca

(Please note, if you do not RSVP at least 24 hours in advance of the session, we cannot guarantee the local videoconference room will be available.)

 

Speaker Info
Dr. Ron Baecker
Emeritus Bell Chair in Human-Computer Interaction, and Founder and Director of the Technologies for Aging Gracefully Lab (TAGlab)
University of Toronto
,
Dr. Ben Mortenson
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
University of British Columbia
Description

Social interaction and support are consistently identified as key aspects of older adults’ quality of life. Lack of communication has been shown to lead to isolation/loneliness, which can result in problems such as depression and cognitive decline for older adults. Declining social capacities are linked with declines in physical, cognitive and emotional functions and their associated implications for disease, dependence, and poorer life quality. Researchers have begun to show that social interaction technologies offer both cognitive stimulation and social connection. The limits of current research and commercial products provide a compelling argument to find a way to reach seniors by increasing their social connectedness, reducing their isolation, loneliness and depression and improving their cognitive functioning and overall health. In this presentation, we will outline three areas in which new communication technologies and associated activities can promote social connectedness among older adults. These consist of (1) new communication tools - InTouch, Second Life, Facebook; (2) collaborating and playing - digital social games, collaborative webquests; and (3) knowledge building and sharing - digital storytelling (life histories; family histories), collaborative online information seeking, reading and writing. We also will provide several examples of research to be conducted around these areas.

About the Speakers:

Dr. Baecker is Director of the Technologies for Aging Gracefully Laboratory (TAGlab), Professor of Computer Science, and emeritus Bell Universities Laboratories Chair in Human-Computer Interaction. He is also Affiliate Scientist with the Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied Research Unit of Baycret, Adjunct Scientist with the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, and founder of both the Dynamic Graphics Project and the Knowledge Media Design Institute at the University of Toronto. He has been named one of the 60 Pioneers of Computer Graphics by ACM SIGGRAPH, has been elected to the CHI (Computers and Human Interaction) Academy by ACM SIGCHI, has been given the Canadian Human Computer Communications Society Achievement Award, has been elected an ACM Fellow, and has been given the GRAND NCE Canadian Digital Media Pioneer Award. His B.Sc., M.Sc., and Ph.D. are from M.I.T. Professor Baecker is an active researcher, lecturer, and consultant on human-computer interaction and user interface design, digital media, computer-supported cooperative work and learning, the Internet, entrepreneurship and strategic planning in the software industry, assistive technology, and technology for seniors. He has published over 300 papers and articles and four books on topics in these areas.

 

Dr. Ben Mortenson is Assistant Professor in the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, UBC. Dr. Mortenson's research focuses on four overlapping areas: assistive technology, social participation, caregiving and outcome measurement. His work is centered on four main populations: assistive technology users, informal and formal caregivers, individuals with spinal cord injury and residents in long-term care. Dr. Mortenson is currently an instructor with the UBC Master of Occupational Therapy Program. Dr. Mortenson is a member of the Canadian Association on Gerontology, the Canadian Society of Occupational Scientists, and the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists.

 

Spring 2014 Series Theme:

The topic of the Spring 2014 Coast to Coast seminar series is "Technology for Aging Well" and it is built around a pan-Canadian project titled AGE-WELL (Aging Gracefully across Environments using Technology to Support Wellness, Engagement and Long Life.) The focus of the series will be a discussion how to use technology in helping support the Canadian aging population to ensure that all Canadians can grow older with dignity and grace.

One of the goals of AGE-WELL is to address socio-economic, ethical, and regulatory challenges related to the development and commercialization of technologies for aging. This includes generating new knowledge about the technology needs of older adults and their caregivers and creating and producing high-quality and sustainable health care solutions for older Canadians. Partners in AGE-WELL include the University Health Network, Simon Fraser University, IBM, Phillips Healtcare, and Fraser Health.

Coordinators of the series are Dr. Andrew Sixsmith, Director of the SFU Gerontology Research Centre and a Deputy Director of the IRMACS Centre, and Dr. Alex Mihailidis, the Barbara G. Stymiest Research Chair in Rehabilitation Technology at the University of Toronto and Toronto Rehab Institute.

The speakers in the series will speak from two perspectives:

  • The perspective of researchers that have successfully built and/or are in the process of building advanced technologies such as communications technologies, robotics, mobile networks, and artificial intelligence with aims to encourage increased independence and safety in the home and to support “aging in place”.
  • The perspective of researchers that have extensive experience within the area of health and quality of life of older people and the role of health and social care services.

This seminar series will be of interest to health and social scientists, engineers, and industry who are either carrying out and/or about to embark on development of innovative technology-based solutions that promote independence and healthy aging and optimize health care resource utilization.

Date:
Registation / More Information:

RSVP: rsvp@westgrid.ca

 

Speaker Info
Dr. Andrew Sixsmith
Professor, Department of Gerontology
Simon Fraser University
,
Ms. Rowena Rizzotti
Vice President Operations
Retirement Concepts
Description

The aging of the population presents many challenges, not least how services can be improved in order to enhance the health and quality of life of older people in the context of limited financial resources. In this context, information and communication technologies (ICTs) have a huge potential to improve services and enhance the well-being and social participation of older people. ICTs for older people have emerged as a major component of R&D programmes worldwide. While technical challenges remain important, future research must focus on innovation as the key goal and respond to respond to a number of non-technical factors if the benefits of ICTs are to be realised. Most research in the area has had a ‘technology-push’ approach that has typically failed to appreciate the significant challenges to creating viable service processes and business models that include technological innovation. Making technology solutions a reality in terms of real-world products and services requires addressing these challenges in a way that creates positive outcomes for all the stakeholders involved. Indeed, our ideas of knowledge translation must go beyond the typical end-of-project dissemination approach to one that includes stakeholder participation and business modelling as fundamental to the whole R&D cycle, so that technologies are congruent with the real-world opportunities and constraints.

 

CLICK HERE TO WATCH LIVE ONLINE
11:30 AM PDT - TUES, MAR 11, 2014

 

About the Speaker:

Andrew Sixsmith was appointed Professor and Director of the Gerontology Research Centre at SFU in September 2007 and a Deputy Director of the SFU Interdisciplinary Research in the Mathematical and Computational Sciences (IRMACS) Centre in 2013. Dr. Sixsmith has been a member of the British Society of Gerontology Executive Committee and has been UK representative on the EU's COST-A5 Committee on Ageing and Technology. Since 2000 he has developed research and teaching links with 26 universities worldwide and has actively collaborated with over 30 major commercial and government organisations.

Dr. Sixsmith's research has two main themes. Firstly, he has extensive research experience within the area of health and quality of life of older people and the role of health and social care services. Recent work includes: the development of management tools for health and social care performance evaluation and decision-making (EU-funded CareKeys project) and; the links between the home environment and health and well-being outcomes (EU-funded ENABLE-AGE project). Secondly, he has been particularly involved in the strategic development of research in the area of technology for independent living. Andrew has used gerontological knowledge, theories and methods to provide input into user centred design and development of community care technologies (telecare) to facilitate and deliver health and social care services for older and disabled people. Currently the EU-funded SOPRANO project aims to explore the potential of "ambient assisted living" (intuitive interfaces and smart environments) to support independent living.

 

Rowena Rizzotti is a highly successful health care leader with over twenty five years experience in both the private and public sectors. A recognized leader in large scale change management processes including Innovation and quality improvement initiatives, Rowena has a significant senior-level experience in multi-site, complex business environments with a very strong understanding of clinical operations and a passion to bring research and evidence into all planning and health care service delivery.

 

Spring 2014 Series Theme:

The topic of the Spring 2014 Coast to Coast seminar series is "Technology for Aging Well" and it is built around a pan-Canadian project titled AGE-WELL (Aging Gracefully across Environments using Technology to Support Wellness, Engagement and Long Life.) The focus of the series will be a discussion how to use technology in helping support the Canadian aging population to ensure that all Canadians can grow older with dignity and grace.

One of the goals of AGE-WELL is to address socio-economic, ethical, and regulatory challenges related to the development and commercialization of technologies for aging. This includes generating new knowledge about the technology needs of older adults and their caregivers and creating and producing high-quality and sustainable health care solutions for older Canadians. Partners in AGE-WELL include the University Health Network, Simon Fraser University, IBM, Phillips Healtcare, and Fraser Health.

Coordinators of the series are Dr. Andrew Sixsmith, Director of the SFU Gerontology Research Centre and a Deputy Director of the IRMACS Centre, and Dr. Alex Mihailidis, the Barbara G. Stymiest Research Chair in Rehabilitation Technology at the University of Toronto and Toronto Rehab Institute.

The speakers in the series will speak from two perspectives:

  • The perspective of researchers that have successfully built and/or are in the process of building advanced technologies such as communications technologies, robotics, mobile networks, and artificial intelligence with aims to encourage increased independence and safety in the home and to support “aging in place”.
  • The perspective of researchers that have extensive experience within the area of health and quality of life of older people and the role of health and social care services.

This seminar series will be of interest to health and social scientists, engineers, and industry who are either carrying out and/or about to embark on development of innovative technology-based solutions that promote independence and healthy aging and optimize health care resource utilization.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating institutions
To attend in person, please RSVP no later than 24 hours in advance of the session and indicate at which location you will be attending.

Registation / More Information:

RSVP: rsvp@westgrid.ca

(Please note, if you do not RSVP at least 24 hours in advance of the session, we cannot guarantee the local videoconference room will be available.)

 

Speaker Info
Dr. Frank Knoefel
Assistant Professor, Department of Family Medicine
University of Ottawa
,
Rafik A. Goubran
Professor and Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Design
Carleton
Description

Technology has been proposed as part of the solution to the challenges of a population that is getting increasingly frail, but prefers to “age in place.” A number of different sensors and sensor types have been proposed to monitor health conditions and overall functioning of older adults in their homes. This C2C seminar will review a number of unobtrusive sensors that have been used in both laboratory and community settings. Our group has used a pressure sensitive mat that can distinguish between healthy and impaired transfers from bed. The same mat has also been used to monitor breathing at the end of life. Other sensors include ones as simple as magnetic switches on the fridge door and as complicated as electronic noses and microphone arrays. Ultimately, these technologies will be able to monitor older adults in their homes and detect changes that can lead to early intervention, thus preventing health or functional deterioration and more significant morbidity, and hence supporting “aging in place.”

About the Speakers:

Dr. Goubran's work focuses on Digital Signal Processing and its applications in audio processing and biomedical engineering. He has led many research projects in the areas of VoIP, sensors, noise and echo cancellation, microphone arrays, and the design of smart independent living environments for seniors. Dr Goubran has published over 170 journal and conference papers, and holds 10 patents in these areas. He is currently chair of the Council of Ontario Deans of Engineering and serving his second term as Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Design at Carleton University.

Dr. Knoefel is a physician trained in care of the elderly with experience in geriatric rehabilitation and memory disorders. He is currently working at Ottawa’s Memory Clinic located at Bruyère Continuing Care. He holds appointments as Assistant Professor, Department of Family Medicine at the University of Ottawa and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Systems and Computer Engineering at Carleton University. He is also a Clinical Scientist at the Bruyère Research Institute, a University of Ottawa and Bruyère Continuing Care Partnership. Dr. Knoefel’s is co-lead of the TAFETA (Technology Assisted Friendly Environment for the Third Age, www.tafeta.ca) research program that is focussed on developing technologies to help older adults “age in place.” His current interests include using sensors for remote monitoring, memory training, cognitive impairment and driving.

Spring 2014 Series Theme:

The topic of the Spring 2014 Coast to Coast seminar series is "Technology for Aging Well" and it is built around a pan-Canadian project titled AGE-WELL (Aging Gracefully across Environments using Technology to Support Wellness, Engagement and Long Life.) The focus of the series will be a discussion how to use technology in helping support the Canadian aging population to ensure that all Canadians can grow older with dignity and grace.

One of the goals of AGE-WELL is to address socio-economic, ethical, and regulatory challenges related to the development and commercialization of technologies for aging. This includes generating new knowledge about the technology needs of older adults and their caregivers and creating and producing high-quality and sustainable health care solutions for older Canadians. Partners in AGE-WELL include the University Health Network, Simon Fraser University, IBM, Phillips Healtcare, and Fraser Health.

Coordinators of the series are Dr. Andrew Sixsmith, Director of the SFU Gerontology Research Centre and a Deputy Director of the IRMACS Centre, and Dr. Alex Mihailidis, the Barbara G. Stymiest Research Chair in Rehabilitation Technology at the University of Toronto and Toronto Rehab Institute.

The speakers in the series will speak from two perspectives:

  • The perspective of researchers that have successfully built and/or are in the process of building advanced technologies such as communications technologies, robotics, mobile networks, and artificial intelligence with aims to encourage increased independence and safety in the home and to support “aging in place”.
  • The perspective of researchers that have extensive experience within the area of health and quality of life of older people and the role of health and social care services.

This seminar series will be of interest to health and social scientists, engineers, and industry who are either carrying out and/or about to embark on development of innovative technology-based solutions that promote independence and healthy aging and optimize health care resource utilization.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced to participating institutions

To attend in person, please RSVP no later than 24 hours in advance of the session and indicate at which location you will be attending.

Registation / More Information:

RSVP: rsvp@westgrid.ca

(Please note, if you do not RSVP at least 24 hours in advance of the session, we cannot guarantee the local videoconference room will be available.)

Speaker Info
Dr. Alan Wagner
Department of Computer Science
University of British Columbia
,
Dr. Humaira Kamal
Department of Computer Science
University of British Columbia
Description

Exascale computing is the next great challenge in supercomputing. Last year, Drs. Humaira Kamal and Alan Wagner, in the Department of Computer Science at the University of British Columbia, notched an exciting signpost on the road to exascale when their team executed programs with over 100 Million processes on 6,480 processor cores on WestGrid machines using Fine-Grain MPI. In this talk, they will share details of that experiment as well as highlights from their ongoing work with Fine-Grain MPI.

Date:
Location

Room ICCSX836, University of British Columbia

Registation / More Information:

https://www.cs.ubc.ca/event/2014/01/talk-limin-jia-run-time-enforcement-information-flow-properties-android

Speaker Info
Limin Jia
Assistant Research Professor
Carnegie-Mellon University
Description

I will talk about improving Android's permission system to prevent confused-deputy attacks and information leakage. Android's system permits Android applications to be concisely annotated with information-flow policies by either the programmers or security analysts. We develop a detailed model of our enforcement system using a process calculus, and use the model to prove noninterference. Our system and model have a number of useful or novel features, including support for Android's single- and multiple-instance components, floating labels, declassification and endorsement capabilities, and support for legacy applications. We have developed a fully functional prototype on Android 4.0.4. We have tested our prototype on a Nexus S phone, verifying that it can enforce practically useful policies that can be implemented with minimal modification to off-the-shelf applications.

Speaker Bio:

Limin Jia is an Assistant Research Professor in ECE and INI. She received her B.E. in Computer Science and Engineering from the University of Science and Technology of China and her Ph.D. in Computer Science from Princeton University. Her research interests include language-based security, programming languages, logic, and program verification. Dr. Jia's research focuses on formal aspects of security. She is particularly interested in applying language-based security techniques as well as formal logic to model and verify security properties of software systems.

Date:
Location

DMP 110, 6245 Agronomy Rd
University of British Columbia

Registation / More Information:

https://www.cs.ubc.ca/event/2014/03/sketching-tool-numerical-linear-algebra-dls-talk-david-woodruff-ibm-almaden-research-c

Speaker Info
David Woodruff
IBM Almaden Research Center
Description

I will discuss how sketching techniques from the data stream literature can be used to speed up well-studied algorithms for problems occurring in numerical linear algebra, such as least squares regression and approximate singular value decomposition. I will also discuss how they can be used to achieve very efficient algorithms for variants of these problems, such as robust regression.

Speaker Bio:

David Woodruff joined the algorithms and complexity group at IBM Almaden in 2007 after completing his Ph.D. at MIT in theoretical computer science. His interests are in compressed sensing, communication, numerical linear algebra, sketching, and streaming. 

Date:
Location

Room - TBD
University of Manitoba

Registation / More Information:

http://www.cs.umanitoba.ca/events/event.php?event=2014-02-20-dr-john-bate

Speaker Info
John Bate
Department of Computer Science
University of British Columbia
Description

Searching efficiently for combinatorial objects requires the elimination of isomorphic configurations, either during the search process itself, or from the results generated. Graph isomorphism methods are used to do this, and there is little room for improvement in the existing algorithms, when applied to individual graphs. However, a method will be presented which can significantly improve their efficiency when applied to large sets of graphs.

I will give a general introduction to the graph isomorphism problem, and a broad outline of the methods used by traditional algorithms in this area, followed by the enhancement for processing large sets of graphs.

Date:
Monday, September 29, 2014 - 7:00 EDT to Friday, October 3, 2014 - 7:00 EDT
Location

Toronto, ON

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

The 65th International Astronautical Congress 2014, the world's premier space event, will take place in Toronto, Canada from September 29 to October 3, 2014 at the award-winning Metro Toronto Convention Centre. The Congress theme “Our World Needs Space” will promote an exploration of the relationship between Earth and space and the ways that space activities help to meet our needs on Earth. The Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute (CASI) is proud to host IAC 2014. CASI has had the priviledge of hosting two previous IACs, both to great acclaim: IAC 1991 in Montreal, and more recently IAC 2004 in Vancouver.

This unique global international collaborative platform brings together experts active in industry, government and academia, as well as many retirees and amateurs of space. IAC 2014 will provide an excellent opportunity for participants from around the world to network and present their latest accomplishments and future plans, identify opportunities for collaboration, and share their opinions on the widest possible array of topics. 

Important deadlines

Abstract Submission : February 25, 2014 
Paper Submission : September 10, 2014 
Presentation Submission : September 22, 2014

Registration:

http://www.iac2014.org/

Date:
Sunday, June 1, 2014 - 7:00 PDT to Thursday, June 5, 2014 - 7:00 PDT
Location

Vancouver, BC

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

This is Canada’s largest annual event devoted to the science and practice of chemistry, and it will give participants a platform to exchange ideas, discover novel opportunities, reacquaint with colleagues, meet new friends, and broaden their knowledge. The conference will held at the new Vancouver Convention Centre, which is a spectacular, green-designed facility on the beautiful waterfront in downtown Vancouver.

The theme of the CSC 2014 Conference is “Chemistry from Sea to Sky”; it will broadly cover all disciplines of chemistry from fundamental research to "blue sky" applications, highlight global chemical scientific interactions and collaborations, and feature the unique location, culture and beautiful geography (the Coastal Mountains along the ocean’s edge of Howe Sound) of British Columbia and Vancouver.

We are pleased to have Professor Shankar Balasubramanian (University of Cambridge, UK) and Professor Klaus Müllen (Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, Germany) as the plenary speakers. In addition to divisional symposia, the scientific program also includes several jointly organized international symposia, featuring Canada and each of China, Germany, Japan, Korea, Switzerland and the USA. This new type of symposium at the CSC aims to highlight research interests of Canadians in an international context. Interactions between chemists and TRIUMF (the world's largest cyclotron, based in Vancouver) will also be highlighted via a special "Nuclear and Radiochemistry" Divisional Program.

Date:
Tuesday, August 5, 2014 - 7:00 MDT to Friday, August 8, 2014 - 7:00 MDT
Location

Wilfrid Laurier University

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

This unique conference series brings together delegates from around the world to:

  • Showcase and celebrate scientific work in all areas of physics 
  • Develop resolutions to address gender issues and promote the participation of women in physics 
  • Provide networking opportunities to build a strong, diverse and inclusive worldwide physics community

ICWIP 2014 will feature plenary talks by distinguished speakers from around the world. Currently confirmed speakers include:

  • Melissa Franklin, Mallinckrodt Professor and Chair of Physics, Harvard University 
  • Silvia Torres-Peimbert, Professor Emeritus, Institute of Astronomy, Mexico City University and President Elect of the Executive Committee, International Astronomical Union
  • Claudia Felser, Professor, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Director, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden 
  • Sabine Stanley, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Planetary Physics, University of Toronto 
  • Patience Mthunzi, Senior Scientist Researcher, National Laser Centre - Biophotoncs, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, South Africa 
  • Tsai-Chien Chiang, Editor in Chief of the China Times and author of "Madam Wu Chien-Shiung: The First Lady of Physics Research" 
Date:
Monday, May 5, 2014 - 7:00 EDT to Thursday, May 8, 2014 - 7:00 EDT
Location

Ryerson University
Toronto, ON

Registation / More Information:

http://www.ccece2014.org

Speaker Info
Description

CCECE is the flagship conference for researchers, students, and professionals in the area of Electrical and Computer Engineering from Canada and around the world to meet annually in a Canadian city to disseminate their research advancements and discoveries, to network and exchange ideas in order to strengthen existing partnerships and foster new collaborations.

CCECE 2014 with the theme ‘Leveraging Technology for a Better Tomorrow’ will feature eight mini-symposia covering diverse areas of Electrical and Computer Engineering, number of tutorial sessions, plenary and keynote talks from renowned researchers/entrepreneurs in industry and academia, the IEEE Canada Awards and Banquet night, best paper awards luncheon, and a career fair. We expect close to 500 attendees.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

https://computecanada.ca/researcher-consultation#online

Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada (CC) is undertaking an extensive consultation process to develop a strategic plan to direct its activities over the next five years. This Online Town Hall session is being held to gather feedback from members of Canada's research community. 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

An executive summary and an overview of a draft strategic plan has been created for attendees to review before the Town Hall. Discussions at the meeting will be structured around the following questions:

  • What is the most significant gap or problem in the delivery of advanced computing in Canada? 
  • What is the most important thing that CC should do during its next mandate? 
  • What are the particular challenges CC will face in achieving its proposed goals? 
  • Are we being sufficiently forward looking? What is missing?

How to Participate

Connect by Phone
Participants can connect via phone by calling 1-855-728-4677 extension 5547.

Connect by Videoconference

Connect using Vidyo videoconferencing technology by pointing a web browser to https://computecanada.ca/video-consultation and following the installation instructions.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Written Feedback

If you are unable to attend this Online Town Hall or if you have additional feedback to share, you can email your feedback to consultation@computecanada.ca.

More Information

For more information on Compute Canada's national consultation and strategic planning processes, please visit the CC website.

Date:
Monday, March 24, 2014 - 7:00 MDT to Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 7:00 MDT
Location

San Jose, CA

Registation / More Information:

http://www.gputechconf.com/page/home.html

Speaker Info
Description

Join us at GPU Technology Conference (GTC) 2014 – the world's biggest and most important GPU developer conference. Taking place in Silicon Valley, GTC offers unmatched opportunities to learn how to harness the latest GPU technology, along with face-to-face interaction with industry luminaries and NVIDIA experts.

GTC includes:

  • 500 sessions on the latest scientific discovery and innovations
  • Hands-on parallel programming labs
  • Opportunities to connect one-on-one with NVIDIA experts
  • Cutting-edge technology demos
  • And much more

Join us at the epicenter of computing technology to see how GPUs are accelerating impactful results.

Date:
Monday, June 2, 2014 - 7:00 MDT to Friday, June 6, 2014 - 7:00 MDT
Location

The institute takes place on the University of Victoria campus, and is hosted by the University of Victoria's Electronic Textual Cultures Lab in the Faculty of Humanities.

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

The Digital Humanities Summer Institute at the University of Victoria provides an ideal environment for discussing and learning about new computing technologies and how they are influencing teaching, research, dissemination, creation, and preservation in different disciplines, via a community-based approach. During a week of intensive coursework, seminars, and lectures, participants share ideas and methods, and develop expertise in using advanced technologies. Every summer, the institute brings together faculty, staff, and students from the Arts, Humanities, Library, and Archives communities as well as independent scholars and participants from areas beyond.

Date:
Monday, June 23, 2014 - 7:00 MDT to Friday, June 27, 2014 - 7:00 MDT
Location

Centre for Molecular Simulation, University of Calgary 

 

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Two days of lectures delivered by experts in the field, followed by three days of hands-on training in QM/MM and MD/Gromacs/Martini. 

Registration deadline: April 21, 2014 

TOPICS:

  • Combined quantum/molecular mechanics
  • molecular dynamics
  • coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations 

FOR WHOM:

  • Graduate students
  • postdoctoral fellows
  • researchers 
Date:
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 - 7:00 MDT to Friday, October 17, 2014 - 7:00 MDT
Location

World Trade and Convention Centre

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

CSPC 2014 Themes

Canadian Science and Technology Strategy: Looking Towards 2020
The Canadian government is renewing the country’s science and technology strategy. An unprecedented number of organizations have submitted ideas and proposals in response to a public call. This has increased the level of attention and public discussion to an already heated debate on the need for a national and long-term science and technology strategy. This theme aims to explore this topic further and provide a national stage for some of the most prominent arguments, in particular, those with a long-term perspective.

Innovation and Partnerships: A recipe for success
In the world of ever changing and multi-disciplinary science and technology, partnership is an indispensable ingredient. At the institutional level, promoting and facilitating effective partnerships is a strategic action. Through its Networks of Centres of Excellence programs, as well as the innovative Community—University Research alliances initiatives, Canada has been a leader in fostering national, international and inter-sectoral partnerships. How well have they worked? What have we learned from these models? How well do these models foster regional development and sustainability – social and economic? What can and should we learn from other countries? This theme will discuss the status of Canadian science and technology partnerships, at various levels including across disciplines, sectors and at the international level.

The Art and Science of Risk Assessment; A Global Conversation:
Risk assessment has become an important S&T issue, capturing more global attention. Extreme weather occurrences including, hurricanes, floods and earthquakes as a result of climate change, invasive species, pandemics, and concerns around bioterrorism are among the risks that policy makers are increasingly being required to confront. This theme will discuss the role of science to forecast, manage and mitigate these risks.

Advancing Canadian Economic Development and Prosperity with S&T:
The role of science and technology in economic development and prosperity is undisputable. However perspectives on what are the optimal investments in S&T for the purpose of economic development have evolved in the past few decades. This theme aims to explore various dimensions of this topic.

Date:
Tuesday, April 29, 2014 - 16:00 MDT to Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 23:00 MDT
Location

Unviersity of Alberta

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

The University of Alberta is an important partner in WestGrid and Compute Canada’s large-scale High Performance Computing (HPC) platform. University of Alberta students, researchers and faculty can tap into this platform to achieve their research objectives!

This two-day workshop series was designed to provide HPC-users of all levels with an overview of Compute Canada and WestGrid functions and opportunities. The first two sessions — scheduled for Tuesday, April 29 — are designed as beginner-level background courses. The following sessions — scheduled for Wednesday, April 30 — will build on the knowledge gained in the previous sessions to provide participants with a full suite of tools for making effective use of HPC resources.

Come to one session, or come to them all! 

Please note: A WestGrid account is recommended to participate fully in some of the sessions, but is not required to attend the workshop. If you are interested in obtaining a account, please WestGrid's Getting an Account page for more information.

Date:
Sunday, June 22, 2014 - 7:00 CEST to Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 7:00 CEST
Location

Congress Center Leipzig (CCL)

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Now in its 29th year, ISC is the world’s oldest and Europe’s most important conference and networking event for the HPC community, offering a strong five-day technical program focusing on HPC technological development and its application in scientific fields as well as its adoption in an industrial environment.

Over 300 hand-picked expert speakers and 170 exhibitors, consisting of leading research centers and vendors, will greet this year’s attendees to ISC. A number of events complement the technical program including Tutorials, the TOP500 Announcement, Research Paper Sessions, Birds of a Feather (BoF) Sessions, the Research Poster Session, Exhibitor Forums, and Workshops.

ISC’14 is open to engineers, IT specialists, systems developers, vendors, end users, scientists, researchers, students and other members of the HPC global community.

The ISC exhibition attracts decision-makers from automotive, defense, aeronautical, gas & oil, banking and other industries, as well as analysts, solution providers, data storage suppliers, distributors, hardware and software manufacturers, the media, scientists, and universities. By attending, they will to learn firsthand about new products, applications and the latest technological advances in the supercomputing industry.

Date:
Location

Sheraton Vancouver Wall Centre (1088 Burrard Street)

Registation / More Information:

Not required.

Speaker Info
Description

Throughout the month of June, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) will be holding a series of information sessions across Canada to gather commmunity feedback on its new Cyber-infrastructure Initiative. The CFI has earmarked $50 million for this initiative, to offer the institutions that make up the Compute Canada national platform an opportunity to upgrade their current computational and storage capacities, and an opportunity for researchers to work closely with data scientists and tool developers to devise optimal ways of organizing, categorizing and analyzing their data resources. 

Throughout the month of June, the CFI will be holding a series of information sessions across Canada to gather commmunity feedback. Following that consultation process, a draft Call for Proposals will be developed. 

Researchers, senior researcher administrators, university staff and others interested in this initiative are invited to attend these sessions in person or to send input to Robert Davidson, Vice-President, Programs And Planning, at robert.davidson@innovation.ca.

More Information

http://www.innovation.ca/en/OurFunds/CFIFunds/CFIcyberinfrastructureinitiative

Date:
Location

University of Calgary Campus
Escalus Room MacEwan Hall

Registation / More Information:

Not required.

Speaker Info
Description

Throughout the month of June, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) will be holding a series of information sessions across Canada to gather commmunity feedback on its new Cyber-infrastructure Initiative. The CFI has earmarked $50 million for this initiative, to offer the institutions that make up the Compute Canada national platform an opportunity to upgrade their current computational and storage capacities, and an opportunity for researchers to work closely with data scientists and tool developers to devise optimal ways of organizing, categorizing and analyzing their data resources. Following this consultation process, a draft Call for Proposals will be developed. 

Researchers, senior researcher administrators, university staff and others interested in this initiative are invited to attend these sessions in person or to send input to Robert Davidson, Vice-President, Programs And Planning, at robert.davidson@innovation.ca.

More Information

http://www.innovation.ca/en/OurFunds/CFIFunds/CFIcyberinfrastructureinitiative

Date:
Location

University of Alberta Campus
ETLC Room E6-060
(9107 116 St NW)

Registation / More Information:

Not required.

Speaker Info
Description

Throughout the month of June, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) will be holding a series of information sessions across Canada to gather commmunity feedback on its new Cyber-infrastructure Initiative. The CFI has earmarked $50 million for this initiative, to offer the institutions that make up the Compute Canada national platform an opportunity to upgrade their current computational and storage capacities, and an opportunity for researchers to work closely with data scientists and tool developers to devise optimal ways of organizing, categorizing and analyzing their data resources. 

Following this consultation process, a draft Call for Proposals will be developed. 

Researchers, senior researcher administrators, university staff and others interested in this initiative are invited to attend these sessions in person or to send input to Robert Davidson, Vice-President, Programs And Planning, at robert.davidson@innovation.ca.

More Information

http://www.innovation.ca/en/OurFunds/CFIFunds/CFIcyberinfrastructureinitiative

Date:
Location

University of Manitoba Campus
Borger Boardroom, EITC-E1 270

Registation / More Information:

Not required.

Speaker Info
Description

Throughout the month of June, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) will be holding a series of information sessions across Canada to gather commmunity feedback on its new Cyber-infrastructure Initiative. The CFI has earmarked $50 million for this initiative, to offer the institutions that make up the Compute Canada national platform an opportunity to upgrade their current computational and storage capacities, and an opportunity for researchers to work closely with data scientists and tool developers to devise optimal ways of organizing, categorizing and analyzing their data resources. 

Following this consultation process, a draft Call for Proposals will be developed. 

Researchers, senior researcher administrators, university staff and others interested in this initiative are invited to attend these sessions in person or to send input to Robert Davidson, Vice-President, Programs And Planning, at robert.davidson@innovation.ca.

More Information

http://www.innovation.ca/en/OurFunds/CFIFunds/CFIcyberinfrastructureinitiative

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Sorry registration for the July session is now FULL.

There will be another session offered September 11, 2014 at 1 pm MDT, CLICK HERE for more details and to register.

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions.

Speaker Info
Kamil Marcinkowski
Site Lead
University of Alberta
Description

This hands-on, online workshop focuses on getting the most out of a cluster using a scheduler. In this two-hour session, we will discuss how a scheduler works and how to use the knowledge to your advantage. Participants will practice how to submit jobs, with a focus on productivity. 

The topics covered include:

  • optimizing walltime
  • MPI and OpenMP jobs
  • job arrays

A followup tutorial will be delivered in September and discuss job dependencies, software licences, and other advanced scheduling topics. Knowledge and practice of the topics covered in this first session are a prerequisite for attending the session in September. 

Course Materials:

 

 
Who Should Attend:

This session is intended for current WestGrid account holders who have had some experience submitting jobs but would like to learn how to increase their job productivity and efficiency. Familiarity with logging in to WestGrid systems, using UNIX and basic job script commands is recommended. 

Date:
Sunday, November 16, 2014 - 8:00 MST to Friday, November 21, 2014 - 8:00 MST
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

SC14 brings together the most respected minds in high performance computing, networking, storage and analysis to debut the research and innovation that will open the door to new scientific and economic opportunities.

In November of 2014, SC is going back to New Orleans with new ideas and a fresh take on HPC. Spotlighting the most original and fascinating scientific and technical applications from around the world, SC14 will once again bring together the HPC community – an unprecedented array of scientists, engineers, researchers, educators, students, programmers, system administrators, and developers – for an exceptional program of technical papers, tutorials, timely research posters, and Birds-of-a-Feather (BOF) sessions. 

The SC14 Exhibition Hall will feature exhibits of the latest and greatest technologies from industry, academia and government research organizations; many of these technologies will be seen for the first time in New Orleans. Mark your calendar and make your way to New Orleans. No city offers the same extraordinary mix of food, music, culture, and history; and no conference offers a better opportunity to view the why HPC matters. 

Date:
Wednesday, September 17, 2014 - 7:00 MDT to Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 7:00 MDT
Location

Omni King Edward Hotel

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Mark your calendars for an exceptional couple of days in which leaders from academia, industry and government will come together to explore opportunities for Canada to seize the leadership position in the global knowledge economy:

  • Be inspired by the leaps that Canadians are taking in research and innovation, to lead the world in the creation and adoption of technologies that will shape our future. 

  • Build new, cross-sector relationships and collaborations through networking opportunities. 

  • Contribute your thoughts and ideas to help shape Canada into a digital powerhouse on the world stage.
Date:
Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 7:00 MDT to Thursday, October 30, 2014 - 7:00 MDT
Location

BMO Centre

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Join us at Canada 3.0 as leading energy industry innovators and decision makers, digital innovation companies, researchers, government policy makers and international delegates meet to explore energy sectors needs and identify solution opportunities for developing, adopting and deploying digital innovation solutions to help improve the energy industry’s bottom line, productivity and sustainability.

Why Attend?

  • Explore the energy sector’s key operating and sustainability challenges and opportunities where innovative digital innovation firms, including small companies, can provide solutions along the energy supply chain. 
  • Learn about digital technology innovations (e.g. sensors, geomatics, communications, and software & data – cloud, open data, analytics, information visualization) can be better applied as solutions to help the energy sector. 
  • Discuss government-led initiatives that will influence the future sustainability of the energy industry – e.g. environmental regulations/monitoring programs and technology commercialization initiatives. 
  • Network with leaders from energy, digital innovation, government, universities and international delegates. 


Who Should Attend?

  • Industry (oil & gas, pipelines, electrical generation/transmission, energy services, digital innovation – including small firms): executives, innovation-focused development & adoption managers & engineers, senior project leaders, HR and training managers, business development leaders. 
  • Researchers: those advancing energy systems research, computing science, sustainability, business and engineering.
  • Government: senior leaders focused on policy, regulations, technology commercialization, environmental monitoring.
Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Registration is limited to the first 25 participants and will likely fill up fast so please register early. CLICK HERE to complete the online registration form.

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions.

Speaker Info
Kamil Marcinkowski
Site Lead
University of Alberta
Description

Back by popular demand! Due to the overwhelming response to our first session scheduled July 17, we will be once again offering this popular topic. 

This hands-on, online workshop focuses on getting the most out of a cluster using a scheduler. In this two-hour session, we will discuss how a scheduler works and how to use the knowledge to your advantage. Participants will practice how to submit jobs, with a focus on productivity. 

The topics covered include:

  • optimizing walltime
  • MPI and OpenMP jobs
  • job arrays

A followup tutorial PART II will be delivered September 18 which will go into more detail about job dependencies, software licences, and other advanced scheduling topics. Knowledge and practice of the topics covered in this first session are a prerequisite for attending the follow-up session. 

Course Materials:

 
Who Should Attend:

This session is intended for current WestGrid account holders who have had some experience submitting jobs but would like to learn how to increase their job productivity and efficiency. Familiarity with logging in to WestGrid systems, using UNIX and basic job script commands is recommended. 

Date:
Location

Edmonton New Technology Society
11232 109 Ave NW
EdmontonAB T5H 1E2
Canada

Registation / More Information:

Click HERE for more information and to register. 

Speaker Info
Description

Do you have some great ideas, but lack the computing resources to really exercise them? If you're an academic, researcher, non-profit, entrepreneur or general innovator, we can help.

In this talk we'll provide an introduction to cloud computing and go into OpenStack and how to use it. We'll also demonstrate and show you how to freely access Cybera’s Rapid Access Cloud, which provides Alberta-based cloud computing resources for Albertans to test and prototype their ideas.

In this workshop you will learn:

•What kinds of projects are suitable for cloud 

•How to get started on OpenStack and the Rapid Access Cloud

•An introduction to OpenStack and its tools

 

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Registration is limited to 25 participants. Please register by Monday September 15 by clicking HERE.

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions. 

Speaker Info
Kamil Marcinkowski
Site Lead
University of Alberta
Description

This hands-on workshop is a follow-up to “Scheduling and Job Management: How to Get the Most from a Cluster” and focuses on more in depth discussion, and practice submitting optimized memory requests for a job. 

This two-hour online session will discuss software licenses, job dependencies, accounting groups and advanced requests as they relate to scheduling. Participants will practice examining jobs, their states and how to troubleshoot problems.

The scheduling topics covered also include:

  • fairness
  • priority
  • reservations

Knowledge and practice of the topics covered in the previous workshop “Scheduling and Job Management: How to Get the Most from a Cluster” are a prerequisite for attending this workshop. 

Course Materials:

Who Should Attend:

This session is intended for current WestGrid account holders who attended the introductory workshop - “Scheduling and Job Management: How to Get the Most from a Cluster” and have had some experience submitting jobs but would like to learn how to increase their job productivity and efficiency. Familiarity with logging in to WestGrid systems, using U/LINIX and basic job script commands is recommended.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced and online via live webstream.

Registation / More Information:

To attend in personplease RSVP here for one of our participating campus locations.

To watch via webstream, please tune into http://www.westgrid.ca/live at the time the session is scheduled to start. 

 

For more information on other seminars and workshops offered through WestGrid, please visit our Training and Seminars page.

Speaker Info
Patrick Mann
Manager, Technical Operations
WestGrid
Description

Interested in expanding HPC use within your research? Not sure where to begin? This introductory session will provide an overview of the WestGrid and Compute Canada resource structures, as well as walk through the basics of getting started with an account.

Any faculty members and graduate students interested in or curious about using HPC are invited to attend. WestGrid support personnel will be on-hand to answer any specific introductory questions attendees may have.

CLICK HERE to view the slides from the presentation.

Allinea DDT
Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

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To join the online meeting (Now from mobile devices!) 

1. Click here to connect.

2. If requested, enter your name and email address. 

3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: parallel 

4. Click "Join". 

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To join the audio conference only 

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Call-in toll number (US/Canada): 1-650-479-3208 

 Access code: 627 029 224 

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For more information contact Beau Paisley at bpaisley@allinea.com

Speaker Info
Description

**PLEASE NOTE THE MEETING LINK HAS CHANGED: CLICK HERE TO CONNECT.**

This course for application developers gives you the ability to do more science & spend less time debugging and includes:

  • Powerful, simple techniques to systematically measure and improve application performance & throughput
  • Scientific debugging – applying best practices to efficiently find and fix difficult bugs at all scales
  • Hands-on sessions with the Allinea integrated development tool environment

Content

This Allinea workshop will cover application performance profiling & debugging using tools in the integrated Allinea environment:

  • Common tool suite enabling developers to fix application bugs, improve application performance
  • Allinea tools are an integral part of the workflow of many software developers using HPC resources this include accelerators: NVIDIA GPUs and coprocessors Intel Xeon Phi
  • Techniques that apply to various flavors of parallel software: MPI, CUDA.

Scientific Debugging

Learn the art and the science of high performance debugging - at scale:

  • Incorporating real examples using Allinea DDT
  • With hands-on application code, when and where possible. 
  • Sample code will be provided by Allinea, having access to participant’s code will be better
  • Using an advanced & modern debugging tool can regularly save weeks of effort:
  • By adding process to debugging 
  • Using the right tools for the problem in hand 
  • Will show how to shorten the time spent debugging even further

MPI Performance Profiling

Addressing the challenge of improving application performance; getting your application to run faster:

  • With ever growing system complexity and concurrency, application profiling is more important than ever, yet performance improvements are not obviously achieved
  • In a hybrid environment, experience how the tools will quickly identify code more suited to off load to an accelerator or coprocessor
  • This session explores typical patterns that impact performance including communication imbalance, memory wall and vectorization
  • Participants will learn how to recognize & address issues; with hands on examples using Allinea MAP
Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Phillip Richmond
PhD Student, Wasserman Lab, Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics
BC Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia
Description

Next generation DNA sequencing has emerged in the past 10 years as an invaluable tool for researchers in the biological sciences. Despite its usefulness, the high-throughput and data intensive nature of this technology has created a roadblock for many biologists who lack formal training in computer science and data analysis.

Luckily for researchers across Canada, UBC’s Advanced Research Computing (ARC) and WestGrid have teamed up to provide hands-on basic analysis workshops that lay the foundation of DNA sequencing analysis. Hosted on the Compute Canada national compute platform—freely available to academic researchers across Canada—the workshop series will lay the foundation for future data analysis projects. Workshops will be hosted in a virtual classroom format, making the content available to researchers across the country.

In the first part of this workshop series, we will be taking a short-read DNA sequencing dataset through genomic alignment and subsequent visualization, both critical steps in the majority of DNA sequencing projects. This workshop places an emphasis on data formats, interacting with the compute server, and using the popular open source bioinformatics tools: BWA, Samtools, and IGV.

Prerequisite Knowledge and Requirements:

  • The primary prerequisite for the course is some past exposure to working in a Linux environment*. For example, during the workshop you will use an SSH terminal client to connect to a remote Linux server, type commands at the Linux shell prompt and will need to be able to view and edit files.
    • * Note: For those interested in the class without Linux experience, a quick primer will be sent out to registered participants. While we encourage participation, the course can also be followed along without executing commands.
  • You need a WestGrid account to participate in this session, however if you do not currently have one, a guest account can be created for you. When you register for the session, please indicate if you require a guest account.

Who Should Attend:

  • Any research faculty, grad students, or university staff interested in learning the basic steps of DNA sequencing analysis and using popular open source bioinformatics tools such as BWA, Samtools, and IGV.

 

GPU Technology Conference 2015
Date:
Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 7:00 PDT to Friday, March 20, 2015 - 7:00 PDT
Location

San Jose McEnery Convention Center

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

The GPU Technology Conference (GTC) is the world's biggest GPU developer conference and sits at the epicenter of visual computing technology, drawing people from all over the world from science, media and entertainment, manufacturing, mobile computing, and game development to see how GPUs are accelerating impactful results.

GTC offers unmatched opportunities to learn how to harness the power of GPUs. With hundreds of deep-dive sessions on diverse topics ranging from Numerical Algorithms to Languages & Compilers, Computational Physics, Computer Vision, Machine Learning, and Big Data Analytics, 3D Design, and Film Production, there's something for every developer to explore. GTC attracts developers, researchers, and technologists from over 50 countries. This means your next breakthrough could be just one conversation away. At GTC there are ample opportunities to have one-on-one interactions with industry luminaries and NVIDIA developers, software engineers, and architects in a fun environment.

Topic areas for 2015 (subject to change) include:

  • Astronomy & Astrophysics
  • Augmented Reality / Virtual Reality
  • Automotive
  • Big Data Analytics
  • Computational Physics
  • Computer Vision / Machine Vision
  • Data Center, Cloud Computing & HPC
  • Developer – Algorithms
  • Developer – Performance Optimization
  • Developer – Programming Languages
  • Developer Tools & Libraries
  • Digital Manufacturing
  • Education & Training
  • Energy Exploration
  • Finance
  • Game Development
  • GPU Virtualization & Remote Graphics
  • Life Science
  • Machine Learning & AI
  • Media & Entertainment
  • Medical Imaging
  • Product Design & Styling
  • Real-Time Graphics
  • Rendering
  • Signal & Audio Processing
  • Supercomputing
  • Video & Image Processing
  • Visualization – Large Scale and Multi-Display
  • Visualization – In-Situ and Scientific
  • Web Acceleration
Date:
Location

Videoconferenced and online via live webstream.

Registation / More Information:

To attend in personplease RSVP here for one of our participating campus locations.

To watch via webstream, please tune into http://www.westgrid.ca/live at the time the session is scheduled to start. 

For more information on other seminars and workshops offered through WestGrid, please visit our Training and Seminars page.

Speaker Info
Masao Fujinaga
Programmer Analyst, Information Services & Technology; WestGrid Support Team
University of Alberta
Description

This session will provide attendees with a step-by-step tutorial on using WestGrid computing facilities, including demonstrations of how to log in, submit jobs, move data, and troubleshoot problems. This will be an introductory-level session, covering the basics of getting started and providing tips for efficient and effective use of the machines.

WestGrid support personnel will be on-hand to answer more advanced questions attendees may have.

Date:
Location

Videoconferenced and online via live webstream (details below in 'Registration')

Registation / More Information:

To attend in personplease RSVP here for one of our participating campus locations.
* Special Notes:*
1) Our seminar location at the University of Northern British Columbia has changed for this session only. To attend in person at UNBC, please go to Room #3-1030.*
2) With the Daylight Savings switchover on November 02, this effects the seminar times for locations at the University of Saskatchewan and the University of Regina. This seminar will be at 1:30 pm CST for USask and URegina.

To watch via webstream, please tune into http://www.westgrid.ca/live

 

For more information on other seminars and workshops offered through WestGrid, please visit our Training and Seminars page.

Speaker Info
Ryan Enge
WestGrid Support Team
University of Victoria
Description

Later this year, WestGrid will be launching a new cloud system. Ryan Enge, a member of WestGrid's Support Team at the University of Victoria, will provide an overview of the new system's features and capabilities, and walk interested users through the steps of using the cloud to support their computational needs. 

Andrew Bradbury Coast to Coast Seminar Series
Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

To attend in personplease RSVP here for one of our participating campus locations.

To watch via webstream, please tune into http://www.irmacs.sfu.ca/about/live-video at the time the session is scheduled to start. 

 

Speaker Info
Andrew Bradbury
Group Leader
Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico
Description

Speaker Bio:

Andrew Bradbury has been a technical staff member at Los Alamos National Lab since July 1999. He has worked in the field of phage display and antibody engineering for 15 years, and has helped organize over 30 international congresses and practical courses in this field, both in Europe and the US. He has published over 80 peer-reviewed articles, including a number of reviews and commentaries on phage display and antibody engineering, and he has 12 filed patents/invention disclosures. He is one of the founder members of “The Antibody Society”, and is on the editorial board of three journals. Dr. Bradbury's research is funded in part by the New Mexico Spatiotemporal Modeling Center, one of the NIGMS-funded National Centers for Systems Biology.

* * * * * * *

The theme for the Fall 2014 program of the Coast to Coast Seminar Series is “Deep Sequencing Antibody and T-cell Receptor Repertoires for the Study of Infectious and Autoimmune Disease, and Development of Vaccines and Therapeutics”. The sessions will examine an immediate and pressing “Big Data” problem faced by researchers examining the immune response to infectious and autoimmune diseases, and those developing vaccines and therapeutic antibodies.

The series is partly motivated by a specific middleware prototype that The IRMACS Centre is developing called iReceptor, supported by CANARIE. More importantly, the proposed series will be an important opportunity to help integrate the Canadian and greater international community that is grappling with this Big Data problem, and who will be participating in a series of “Workshops on Analysis, Storage and Sharing of Next-Generation Sequence Data from B-cell Receptor/Antibody and T-cell Receptor Repertoires” to be held May 29-June 1, 2015 in Vancouver.

* * * * * * *

For more information on other seminars and workshops offered through WestGrid, please visit our Training and Seminars page.

Jacob Glanville Coast to Coast Seminar Series
Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

To attend in personplease RSVP here for one of our participating campus locations.

To watch via webstream, please tune into http://www.irmacs.sfu.ca/about/live-video at the time the session is scheduled to start. 

 

Speaker Info
Jacob Glanville
Chief Science Officer
Distributed Bio, Seattle
Description

Speaker Bio:

Jacob did his undergraduate studies in Molecular and Cell Biology at UC Berkeley, with an emphasis in Genetics, Genomics and Development. He performed research in two academic laboratories that specialized in quantitative biology. In Dr. Glenys Thomson's HLA Population Genetics laboratory, Jacob designed HLA allele drift simulators, and developed equivalency metrics across HLA typing protocols of various resolutions. In Dr. Sjolander's Berkeley Phylogenomics Group, Jacob published an automated webserver pipeline for phylogenomic functional analysis of proteins. In March 2008, Jacob was recruited to become Principal Scientist at Pfizer's Rinat research facility, where he developed novel computational immunology methods for characterizing and optimizing functions of the adaptive immune system. His published research emphasizes the sequence, structure and functional analysis of antibody repertoires for characterizing genetic variation in patient populations, optimizing phage display libraries based on profiles of natural selection, and engineering monoclonal antibody biologic medicines. Jacob joined as the Scientific Director of Distributed Bio in April 2012.

* * * * * * *

The theme for the Fall 2014 program of the Coast to Coast Seminar Series is “Deep Sequencing Antibody and T-cell Receptor Repertoires for the Study of Infectious and Autoimmune Disease, and Development of Vaccines and Therapeutics”. The sessions will examine an immediate and pressing “Big Data” problem faced by researchers examining the immune response to infectious and autoimmune diseases, and those developing vaccines and therapeutic antibodies.

The series is partly motivated by a specific middleware prototype that The IRMACS Centre is developing called iReceptor, supported by CANARIE. More importantly, the proposed series will be an important opportunity to help integrate the Canadian and greater international community that is grappling with this Big Data problem, and who will be participating in a series of “Workshops on Analysis, Storage and Sharing of Next-Generation Sequence Data from B-cell Receptor/Antibody and T-cell Receptor Repertoires” to be held May 29-June 1, 2015 in Vancouver.

* * * * * * *

For more information on other seminars and workshops offered through WestGrid, please visit our Training and Seminars page.

Date:
Location

Room ECS 660
University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Belaid Moa
WestGrid Support Team
University of Victoria
Description

This free workshop series will cover a wide spectrum of techniques and tools to help researchers deal with small and big data challenges. Our intent is for our researchers to learn different computational paradigms and topics by participating in hands-on tutorials. To make these sessions more rewarding, we encourage attendees to bring their own data and any existing code with them so that they can work on them as part of the practical exercises.

You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop.
Any researcher who is interested in learning more about batch and parallel programming is invited to attend.

All disciplines and experience levels are welcome.

The topics covered during these sessions include:

  • batch and embarrassingly parallel processing
  • map reduce and hadoop
  • parallel Python and R
  • parallel Matlab
  • MPI and OpenCL/CUDA
  • topic modeling and machine learning
  • network analysis and visualization
  • ...and much more.

The workshop will consist of three parts. You can choose to attend one or multiple sessions.

PART I - Getting Started
Tuesday, Oct 14 
1:00 - 4:30 pm
or
Wednesday, Oct 15 (repeat of Tuesday's session)
1:00 - 4:30 pm

PART II - Beyond the Fundamentals
Thursday, Oct 16 
1:00 - 4:30 pm
or
Friday, Oct 17 (repeat of Thursday's session)
2:30 - 5:30 pm

PART III - Fast Track - Review & Summary; Getting Things Done
Saturday, Oct 18
1:30 - 4:30 pm

Date:
Location

Room ECS 660
University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Belaid Moa
WestGrid Support Team
University of Victoria
Description

This free workshop series will cover a wide spectrum of techniques and tools to help researchers deal with small and big data challenges. Our intent is for our researchers to learn different computational paradigms and topics by participating in hands-on tutorials. To make these sessions more rewarding, we encourage attendees to bring their own data and any existing code with them so that they can work on them as part of the practical exercises.

You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop.

Any researcher who is interested in learning more about batch and parallel programming is invited to attend. 

All disciplines and experience levels are welcome.

The topics covered during these sessions include:

  • batch and embarrassingly parallel processing
  • map reduce and hadoop
  • parallel Python and R
  • parallel Matlab
  • MPI and OpenCL/CUDA
  • topic modeling and machine learning
  • network analysis and visualization
  • ...and much more.

The workshop will consist of three parts. You can choose to attend one or multiple sessions.

PART I - Getting Started
Tuesday, Oct 14 
1:00 - 4:30 pm
or
Wednesday, Oct 15 (repeat of Tuesday's session)
1:00 - 4:30 pm

PART II - Beyond the Fundamentals
Thursday, Oct 16 
1:00 - 4:30 pm
or
Friday, Oct 17 (repeat of Thursday's session)
2:30 - 5:30 pm

PART III - Fast Track - Review & Summary; Getting Things Done
Saturday, Oct 18
1:00 - 4:30 pm

Date:
Location

Room ECS 660
University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Belaid Moa
WestGrid Support Team
University of Victoria
Description

This free workshop series will cover a wide spectrum of techniques and tools to help researchers deal with small and big data challenges. Our intent is for our researchers to learn different computational paradigms and topics by participating in hands-on tutorials. To make these sessions more rewarding, we encourage attendees to bring their own data and any existing code with them so that they can work on them as part of the practical exercises.

You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop.

Any researcher who is interested in learning more about batch and parallel programming is invited to attend. 

All disciplines and experience levels are welcome.

The topics covered during these sessions include:

  • batch and embarrassingly parallel processing
  • map reduce and hadoop
  • parallel Python and R
  • parallel Matlab
  • MPI and OpenCL/CUDA
  • topic modeling and machine learning
  • network analysis and visualization
  • ...and much more.

The workshop will consist of three parts. You can choose to attend one or multiple sessions.

PART I - Getting Started
Tuesday, Oct 14 
1:00 - 4:30 pm
or
Wednesday, Oct 15 (repeat of Tuesday's session)
1:00 - 4:30 pm

PART II - Beyond the Fundamentals
Thursday, Oct 16 
1:00 - 4:30 pm
or
Friday, Oct 17 (repeat of Thursday's session)
2:30 - 5:30 pm

PART III - Fast Track - Review & Summary; Getting Things Done
Saturday, Oct 18
1:00 - 4:30 pm

Date:
Location

Room ECS 660
University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Belaid Moa
WestGrid Support Team
University of Victoria
Description

This free workshop series will cover a wide spectrum of techniques and tools to help researchers deal with small and big data challenges. Our intent is for our researchers to learn different computational paradigms and topics by participating in hands-on tutorials. To make these sessions more rewarding, we encourage attendees to bring their own data and any existing code with them so that they can work on them as part of the practical exercises.

You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop.

Any researcher who is interested in learning more about batch and parallel programming is invited to attend. 

All disciplines and experience levels are welcome.

The topics covered during these sessions include:

  • batch and embarrassingly parallel processing
  • map reduce and hadoop
  • parallel Python and R
  • parallel Matlab
  • MPI and OpenCL/CUDA
  • topic modeling and machine learning
  • network analysis and visualization
  • ...and much more.

The workshop will consist of three parts. You can choose to attend one or multiple sessions.

PART I - Getting Started
Tuesday, Oct 14 
1:00 - 4:30 pm
or
Wednesday, Oct 15 (repeat of Tuesday's session)
1:00 - 4:30 pm

PART II - Beyond the Fundamentals
Thursday, Oct 16 
1:00 - 4:30 pm
or
Friday, Oct 17 (repeat of Thursday's session)
2:30 - 5:30 pm

PART III - Fast Track - Review & Summary; Getting Things Done
Saturday, Oct 18
1:00 - 4:30 pm

Date:
Location

Room ECS 660
University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Belaid Moa
WestGrid Support Team
University of Victoria
Description

This free workshop series will cover a wide spectrum of techniques and tools to help researchers deal with small and big data challenges. Our intent is for our researchers to learn different computational paradigms and topics by participating in hands-on tutorials. To make these sessions more rewarding, we encourage attendees to bring their own data and any existing code with them so that they can work on them as part of the practical exercises.

You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop.

Any researcher who is interested in learning more about batch and parallel programming is invited to attend. 

All disciplines and experience levels are welcome.

The topics covered during these sessions include:

  • batch and embarrassingly parallel processing
  • map reduce and hadoop
  • parallel Python and R
  • parallel Matlab
  • MPI and OpenCL/CUDA
  • topic modeling and machine learning
  • network analysis and visualization
  • ...and much more.

The workshop will consist of three parts. You can choose to attend one or multiple sessions.

PART I - Getting Started
Tuesday, Oct 14 
1:00 - 4:30 pm
or
Wednesday, Oct 15 (repeat of Tuesday's session)
1:00 - 4:30 pm

PART II - Beyond the Fundamentals
Thursday, Oct 16 
1:00 - 4:30 pm
or
Friday, Oct 17 (repeat of Thursday's session)
2:30 - 5:30 pm

PART III - Fast Track - Review & Summary; Getting Things Done
Saturday, Oct 18
1:00 - 4:30 pm

Registration open for 2014 Fall WestGrid Data Visualization Workshops
Date:
Location

Room ECS 660
University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

If you have any questions, please contact us.

To view past workshop materials or to download the ParaView software, visit our main Visualization Workshops page.

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

WestGrid is pleased to present a free hands-on workshop on scientific visualization using ParaView. All disciplines and experience levels are welcome. You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing data sets is invited to attend.

ParaView is an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization application. ParaView users can quickly build visualizations to analyze their data using qualitative and quantitative techniques. This workshop will explore the basics of scientific visualization with 2- and 3-dimensional data sets through hands-on exercises.

Attendees will need to bring a laptop and should have ParaView installed on their laptop before the workshop. Wireless networking will be available during the workshop.

Workshop Outline:

  • Scientific visualization overview
  • ParaView interface
  • 2D and 3D visualization
  • Volume rendering
  • Data sets and formats
  • Putting it all together
  • Visualization resources at WestGrid, Compute Canada
  • Remote visualization using WestGrid resources
Registration open for 2014 Fall WestGrid Data Visualization Workshops
Date:
Friday, November 14, 2014 - 17:00 MST to Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 0:30 MST
Location

W857, Centre for the Arts
University of Lethbridge

Registation / More Information:

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

If you have any questions, please contact us

To view past workshop materials or to download the ParaView software, visit our main Visualization Workshops page.

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

WestGrid is pleased to present a free hands-on workshop on scientific visualization using ParaView. All disciplines and experience levels are welcome. You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing data sets is invited to attend.

ParaView is an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization application. ParaView users can quickly build visualizations to analyze their data using qualitative and quantitative techniques. This workshop will explore the basics of scientific visualization with 2- and 3-dimensional data sets through hands-on exercises.

Attendees will need to bring a laptop and should have ParaView installed on their laptop before the workshop. Wireless networking will be available during the workshop.

Workshop Outline:

  • Scientific visualization overview
  • ParaView interface
  • 2D and 3D visualization
  • Volume rendering
  • Data sets and formats
  • Putting it all together
  • Visualization resources at WestGrid, Compute Canada
  • Remote visualization using WestGrid resources
Registration open for 2014 Fall WestGrid Data Visualization Workshops
Date:
Wednesday, November 19, 2014 - 17:00 PST to Thursday, November 20, 2014 - 0:30 PST
Location

*New Location*

Room 3340, 3rd Floor, Pharmaceutical Sciences Building
2405 Wesbrook Mall
University of British Columbia

Registation / More Information:

**This session has reached capacity. To be added to a waitlist and/or notified of a second session, please email us."

To view past workshop materials or to download the ParaView software, visit our main Visualization Workshops page.

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

WestGrid is pleased to present a free hands-on workshop on scientific visualization using ParaView. All disciplines and experience levels are welcome. You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing data sets is invited to attend.

ParaView is an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization application. ParaView users can quickly build visualizations to analyze their data using qualitative and quantitative techniques. This workshop will explore the basics of scientific visualization with 2- and 3-dimensional data sets through hands-on exercises.

Attendees will need to bring a laptop and should have ParaView installed on their laptop before the workshop. Wireless networking will be available during the workshop.

Workshop Outline:

  • Scientific visualization overview
  • ParaView interface
  • 2D and 3D visualization
  • Volume rendering
  • Data sets and formats
  • Putting it all together
  • Visualization resources at WestGrid, Compute Canada
  • Remote visualization using WestGrid resources
CANFAR Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey
Date:
Location

Videoconferenced and online via live webstream (details below in 'Registration')

Registation / More Information:

To attend in personplease RSVP here for one of our participating campus locations.

To watch via webstream, please tune into http://www.westgrid.ca/live at the time the session is scheduled to start. 

For more information on other seminars and workshops offered through WestGrid, please visit our Training and Seminars page.

Speaker Info
Falk Herwig
Associate Professor
University of Victoria
Description

WestGrid user and University of Victoria Associate Professor Falk Herwig joins us to discuss some of the latest projects within CANFAR, the Canadian Advanced Network for Astronomical Research. As observational astronomy continues to become ever more data intensive, WestGrid and Compute Canada storage and computing resources are essential for driving much of CANFAR's work. Modern instrumentation on optical and millimeter-wave observatories produce 100s of gigabytes of data per night and radio telescope observing projects provide users with tebibytes of data over the course of a week’s observation. These RAW datasets are then processed through calibration systems that double their size and then further analyzed and sub-sampled into catalogues and mosaics of images, providing an additional doubling in size of processed outputs. Although the ‘RAW’ observations are stored by telescope archive facilities, the processed datasets are the responsibility of the principle investigator. Typically, large (survey) observing program consist of 50 or more nights per, resulting in a storage requirement of 5 to 10 tebibytes (TiB)of data per year.

CANFAR is an operational research portal for the delivery, processing, storage, analysis, and distribution of very large astronomical datasets. An innovative but challenging new feature of the research portal is the operation of services that channel the onslaught of telescope data through Canadian networks to the computational grid and data grid infrastructure (components of Compute Canada). CANFAR is currently used by many astronomy projects with users located at many institutions across Canada. These projects are using data generated by peer-reviewed allocations of a significant amount of observing time on three of Canada’s telescopes:

  • the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope,
  • the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope,
  • the Herschel Space Observatory,
  • as well as data from other facilities such as the Hubble Space Telescope.

Initial and ongoing development of the CANFAR research portal is supported by grants under CANARIE’s NEP Program to the University of Victoria with additional support from the NRC Herzberg. The portal is operated and maintained by the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC).

Photo Caption: Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey images superimposed on the night sky from Mauna Kea, Hawaii. NGVS is an international project using the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (seen in the foreground).

Novel insights on how vaccines induce long term protection against pathogen challenge will be discussed in this talk
Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

To attend in personplease RSVP here for one of our participating campus locations.

To watch via webstream, please tune into http://www.irmacs.sfu.ca/about/live-video

 

Speaker Info
Dr. Lindsay Cowell
Associate Professor
Department of Clinical Science, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas
Description

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Lindsay Cowell received a MS in Biomathematics with a minor in Mathematics in 1995 from North Carolina State University. In 2000, she received a PhD in Biomathematics with a minor in Immunology, also from North Carolina State University. She spent three years as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Immunology at Duke University Medical Center and then became an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics. She was also on the graduate faculty at Duke for the Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Graduate Program. In September 2010, she joined the Biomedical Informatics Division in the Department of Clinical Sciences at UT Southwestern.

* * * * * * *

The theme for the Fall 2014 program of the Coast to Coast Seminar Series is “Deep Sequencing Antibody and T-cell Receptor Repertoires for the Study of Infectious and Autoimmune Disease, and Development of Vaccines and Therapeutics”. The sessions will examine an immediate and pressing “Big Data” problem faced by researchers examining the immune response to infectious and autoimmune diseases, and those developing vaccines and therapeutic antibodies.

The series is partly motivated by a specific middleware prototype that The IRMACS Centre is developing called iReceptor, supported by CANARIE. More importantly, the proposed series will be an important opportunity to help integrate the Canadian and greater international community that is grappling with this Big Data problem, and who will be participating in a series of “Workshops on Analysis, Storage and Sharing of Next-Generation Sequence Data from B-cell Receptor/Antibody and T-cell Receptor Repertoires” to be held May 29-June 1, 2015 in Vancouver.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

For more information or to register online, click here.

Speaker Info
Description

Allinea Performance Reports gives scientists, cluster administrators, and support specialists a simple, effective way to characterize and understand the performance of HPC application runs with no code instrumentation and less than 5% slowdown. It allows you to:

  • Spot CPU insufficiencies and boost per core performance
  • Effortlessly identify I/O congestion and load
  • Perform instant analysis of MPI behaviour and bottlenecks

Join Allinea for a free 30-minute webinar to learn more about its new Performance Reports software.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

For more information or to register online, click here.

Speaker Info
Description

Allinea Performance Reports gives scientists, cluster administrators, and support specialists a simple, effective way to characterize and understand the performance of HPC application runs with no code instrumentation and less than 5% slowdown. It allows you to:

  • Spot CPU insufficiencies and boost per core performance
  • Effortlessly identify I/O congestion and load
  • Perform instant analysis of MPI behaviour and bottlenecks

Join Allinea for a free 30-minute webinar to learn more about its new Performance Reports software.

Date:
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 7:00 EDT to Wednesday, June 3, 2015 - 7:00 EDT
Location

University of Ottawa

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

This is the first joint conference between the Canadian Society of Digital Humanities/Société canadienne des humanités numériques and the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Scholars, practitioners, and graduate students are invited to submit proposals for papers, sessions and digital demonstrations during this collective meeting, which will be held at the 2015 Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Ottawa, Ontario from 1-3 June. We encourage submissions on all topics relating to both theory and practice in the evolving field of the digital humanities.

Proposals for papers (20 min.), digital demonstrations, and panels (2 - 6 speakers for a 1½ hour session) will be accepted until the 1st of December 2014 and must be submitted to https://www.conftool.net/csdh-schn-ach-2015/. Abstracts for paper proposals should be approximately 500 words long, and should clearly indicate the paper’s thesis, methodology and conclusions. We also welcome proposals for Digital Demonstrations of innovative projects or tools. Demonstrations will be given table space and a backdrop so they can set up a poster and a computer for a 2-hour session. We encourage projects with software to show to apply for this venue.

There is a limited amount of funding available to support graduate student travel. Please note that all presenters must be members of CSDH/SCHN or ACH at the time of the conference.

Selected papers from the conference will appear in special collections published in the CSDH/SCHN society journal, Digital Studies/Le champ numérique, as well as in the ACH society journal, Digital Humanitiques Quarterly.

2015 AI/GI/CRV Conference
Date:
Tuesday, June 2, 2015 - 7:00 ADT to Friday, June 5, 2015 - 7:00 ADT
Location

St. Mary's University

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

The 2015 AI/GI/CRV Conference is a collaboration of three leading conferences: Artificial Intelligence 2015, Graphics Interface 2015 and Computer and Robot Vision 2015. It will bring together hundreds of leaders in research, industry, and government, as well as Canada's most accomplished students, to showcase Canada's ingenuity, innovation and leadership in intelligent systems and advanced information and communications technology.

The Artificial Intelligence conference's mission is to foster excellence and leadership in research, development and education in Canada's artificial intelligence community by facilitating the exchange of knowledge through various media and venues.

Graphics Interface is the Canadian annual conference devoted to computer graphics, interactive systems, and human-computer interaction. It is the oldest regularly-scheduled computer graphics and human-computer interaction conference; the first conference was held in 1969.

Computer and Robot Vision, formerly known as Vision Interface (VI), is the Canadian annual conference related to any aspect of computer vision, robot vision, robotics, medical imaging, image processing or pattern recognition.

A single registration will let you attend any session in the three conferences, which will be scheduled in parallel tracks. Paper submissions are handled by each of the Conferences separately.

HPCS 2015
Date:
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 7:00 MDT to Friday, June 19, 2015 - 7:00 MDT
Location

Concordia University

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

HPCS 2015, Canada’s foremost supercomputing conference, will be co-hosted by Calcul Québec and Compute Canada at the Sir Geoge Williams Campus of Concordia University, in the heart of downtown Montreal. The main event will be preceded by two days of tutorials and worshops June 15-16. 

HPCS is a multi-disciplinary conference, considered Canada's premier advanced computing forum. Each year, Canadian researchers, analysts, and IT professionals from academia and industry gather to exchange the ideas, tools, and new discoveries that are driving today's innovations in computational research. HPCS 2014 was held in Halifax, NS and attracted nearly 300 delegates from across the country to discuss "HPC Serving Society".

ParaView Workshop University of Alberta
Date:
Monday, December 8, 2014 - 21:00 MST to Tuesday, December 9, 2014 - 0:30 MST
Location

ETLC 2-005
University of Alberta

Speaker Info
Dr. Jon Johansson
Videre Analytics Ltd.
Description

University of Alberta researchers are invited to attend a free workshop on Scienctific Visualization with Paraview on Monday, Dec 08. This workshop presents principles and methods for visualizing data resulting from scientific measurements and computations. The discussion will focus on ParaView, but the concepts apply to other visualization tools. Users of ParaView are able to explore data and create visualizations using a visual programming interface. ParaView is open-source and multi-platform, providing great flexibility in collaborative sharing of results.

Workshop participants will work through examples using visualization techniques such as color mapping, surface extraction, glyphs, visualization of scalar and vector fields, isolines and isosurfaces, coloring, and animation. Some programming experience is recommended for this course.

The venue is a computer lab and the machines are powerful enough to do the exercises. Participants will need to have a UofA CCID to access the lab machines and the campus network. Attendees are welcome to bring their own laptops to use for the exercises, but please ensure you have downloaded an installer from www.paraview.org/download prior to the workshop. 

This workshop is sponsored by the Advanced Materials & Processing Laboratory at the University of Alberta.

Date:
Registation / More Information:

To attend in person, please RSVP minimum 24 hours in advance and attend at one of these campus locations.

To watch via webstream, please tune into http://www.westgrid.ca/live

Speaker Info
Roman Baranowski
WestGrid Site Lead
University of British Columbia
Description

This session will provide an overview of WestGrid's computing facilities and include demonstrations of how to log in, submit jobs, and troubleshoot problems. The talk will also focus on how to choose the best system for your work and how to estimate run-times. This is an introductory-level session, covering the basics of getting started and providing tips for efficient and effective use of the machines.

Date:
Wednesday, January 28, 2015 - 17:00 PST to Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 0:30 PST
Location

Room 3340
Pharmaceutical Sciences Building
2405 Wesbrook Mall

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

WestGrid is pleased to present a free hands-on workshop on scientific visualization using ParaView. All disciplines and experience levels are welcome. You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing data sets is invited to attend.

ParaView is an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization application. ParaView users can quickly build visualizations to analyze their data using qualitative and quantitative techniques. This workshop will explore the basics of scientific visualization with 2- and 3-dimensional data sets through hands-on exercises.

Attendees will need to bring a laptop and should have ParaView installed on their laptop before the workshop. Wireless networking will be available during the workshop.

Workshop Outline:

  • Scientific visualization overview
  • ParaView interface
  • 2D and 3D visualization
  • Volume rendering
  • Data sets and formats
  • Putting it all together
  • Visualization resources at WestGrid, Compute Canada
  • Remote visualization using WestGrid resources
Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered live at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and will be videoconferenced and webstreamed to allow for remote participation.

There are three ways to participate. Registration is required for each of them:

  • Attend in person at USask -- Room 2D71, Agriculture Building. RSVP required. 
  • Attend a regional videoconference location -- Locations listed on RSVP form.
  • Watch the webstream online -- RSVP required to obtain webstream link.

Speaker Info
Jason Hlady
WestGrid Site Lead
University of Saskatchewan
Description

This session will provide a detailed overview of the newly launched Compute Canada Globus Portal, a fast, reliable, high-performance service for secure data movement. Globus has an easy-to-use interface with background monitoring features that automate the management of file transfers between any two resources, whether they are at Compute Canada, another supercomputing facility, a campus cluster, lab server, desktop or laptop.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered via Web-Ex.

 

Speaker Info
Belaid Moa
Research and HP Computing Specialist
University of Victoria / WestGrid
,
Beau Paisley
Allinea
Description

**************

PLEASE NOTE THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN CANCELLED.

Due to some technical difficulties and low attendance, the WestGrid Seminar for February 25, 2015, "Allinea DT - Tools for Debugging and Optimizing Your Code" has been CANCELLED.

We hope to present this workshop at a later date and will update the events page with the new information shortly. Our apologies for any inconvenience.

****************

Allinea DDT is a user-friendly and effective tool available through WestGrid which users can access for debugging their code, be it serial or parallel, targeted for CPU, GPU and/or Phi. This session is a special two-hour tutorial that will provide a hands-on workshop by Allinea experts, using example code provided by the workshop participants. All levels of users are welcome to join, including new users and those without WestGrid accounts. 

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered live at Simon Fraser University (SFU) and will be videoconferenced and webstreamed to allow for remote participation.

There are three ways to participate. Registration is required for each of them:

  • Attend in person at SFU -- Room 10901, Applied Sciences Building. RSVP required. 
  • Attend a regional videoconference location -- Locations listed on RSVP form.
  • Watch the webstream online -- RSVP required to obtain webstream link.

Speaker Info
Lixin Liu
WestGrid Networking Coordinator
Description

This session will provide an overview of how to access and use WestGrid's ownCloud service, a Dropbox-like cloud storage platform available to all WestGrid users. 

Genome Sciences Centre
Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered via videoconference from the Genome Sciences Centre.

There are two ways to participate. Registration is required for each of them:

  • Attend a regional videoconference location (interactivity / Q&A ability supported) -- Locations listed on RSVP form.
  • Watch the webstream online (no Q&A ability, viewers can only watch presentation) -- RSVP required to obtain webstream link.

Speaker Info
Dr. Yussanne Ma
Group Leader, Bioinformatics
Genome Sciences Centre
Description

In this session, WestGrid will host a guest speaker from the Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, one of fifteen research programs that operate as part of the BC Cancer Research Centre. The world-class scientific team at the Genome Sciences Centre has played a major role in advancing the fields of genomics and bioinformatics. In July 2014, the Genome Sciences Centre announced a partnership with WestGrid and Compute Canada to join Compute Canada's national platform of computing sites, benefiting researchers across Canada with increased access to bioinformatics software, expertise and extremely secure computing storage. 

Speaker:

Dr. Yussanne Ma
Group Leader, Bioinformatics
Genome Sciences Centre

Abstract:

Dr. Yussanne Ma leads the bioinformatics group at Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre in Vancouver, BC. In this session, she will discuss the ways high performance computing supports her research group's work, highlighting a recent project where a bioinformatics pipeline was built for the personalized onco-genomics project (POG) at the BC Cancer Agency. POG aims to use paired tumour/normal whole genome and transcriptome sequence information from an individual to comprehensively characterize a patient's tumour and inform treatment options within a clinically relevant timeframe. The bioinformatics pipeline developed for this project identifies the somatic abnormalities in a tumour, including single nucleotide variants (SNVs), indels, copy number variation (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), fusions, and gene expression. Interpretation of the somatic profiles are aided by a hand-curated knowledge base of targetable mutations, resistance and sensitivity markers which was developed in house. To date, 171 patients have been enrolled in the POG project, with over 50 cancer subtypes. So far, 120 patients have analysis completed, 14 are in process of being sequenced or analyzed, and 8 are pending biopsy.

In addition to this project, Yussanne's group is also collaborating with IBM on an implementation of its Watson Genomic Analytics platform, a novel IBM Watson solution for interpreting whole genome and transcriptome data from cancer samples to inform treatment. Yussanne's group is involved in the development of the solution and comparing the output to that of their pipeline developed for the POG project.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered live at UBC and will be videoconferenced and webstreamed to allow for remote participation.

There are three ways to participate. Registration is required for each of them.

  • Attend in person at UBC -- Room 4127, Earth Sciences Building 
  • Attend a regional videoconference location -- Locations are listed on RSVP form
  • Watch the webstream online -- RSVP required to obtain webstream link

Speaker Info
Dr. Michael Brauer
Faculty of Medicine, School of Population and Public Health
University of British Columbia
Description

The Border Air Quality Study is a cluster of research projects that was designed to support the development of an international strategy for the Georgia Basin-Puget Sound airshed. The University of British Columbia’s efforts were focused on establishing cohorts to examine the impact of air pollution on birth outcomes, the development of childhood respiratory disease and adult cardiovascular health using multiple administrative health databases linked to geospatial environmental exposure information developed by the research team. Over 40 researchers from the University of British Columbia, the University of Washington and the University of Victoria were involved in the project which was funded by Health Canada.

Data sources linked: 

  • Medical Services Plan (BC Ministry of Health) 
  • Hospital Separations (BC Ministry of Health) 
  • Perinatal Services BC 
  • Vital Statistics Births and Deaths (BC Ministry of Health) 
  • Census data 
  • Ministry of Environment data 
  • Researcher-collected environmental exposure data 
  • Data from Metro Vancouver municipalities

Policy implications: 

These research projects were developed in response to Health Canada’s request for further progress in research to determine sources of greatest concern in each airshed and the development of a common basis of understanding between Canada and the United States regarding transboundary air quality conditions, potential future trends, and associated impacts on human health. The studies aimed to address health and environmental concerns in each airshed by assessing exposures related to specific categories of emissions sources, at both the community and individual level.

Key findings: 

Overall air quality in the Georgia Basin-Puget Sound region is good compared to other major metropolitan areas, but there are still concerns. Birth outcomes, childhood respiratory disease and adult cardiovascular disease are all affected by air pollution, especially that caused by traffic. The air pollution effects are relatively small compared with well-known risk factors, but because the population exposed to traffic is large the population health implications are significant.

Wood smoke is also an important source of air pollution even in urban centres such as Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle – there may be a need to consider additional policy mechanisms to help reduce the health burden of wood smoke. Although levels of wood smoke pollution are often much higher in rural areas, urban wood smoke may have a bigger population-level health impact, because the number of people exposed is much greater.

The tools developed in the Border Air Quality Study enable air quality managers to identify pollution ‘hotspots’, and to identify where higher levels of pollution coincide with at-risk populations. This is an important improvement on previous approaches to monitor and manage air quality.

Land-use decisions by local governments, school boards and others could play a significant role in reducing the exposure of at-risk groups (such as children and the elderly) to air pollution.

 

Speaker Bio:

Michael Brauer joined the UBC faculty in 1991 in the Department of Medicine. He was an inaugural member of the Occupational Hygiene Program and served as Director of the School of Environmental Health from 2003-2008 and as as the Occupational and Environmental Health theme co-lead in SPPH from 2011-2014. He is currently Director of the Bridge Program, a strategic training fellowship program linking public health, engineering and policy. He also holds associate appointments in the Division of Respiratory Medicine and the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at UBC.

Dr. Brauer received bachelor’s degrees in Biochemistry and Environmental Sciences from the University of California-Berkeley (1986) and a doctorate in Environmental Health from Harvard University (1990). He was a visiting scientist at the Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine at Arhus University in Denmark (1991), at the Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences at Utrecht University in The Netherlands (2000) and at the East-West Center in Hawaii, USA (2008). His research focuses on the assessment of exposure and health impacts of air pollution, with specific interest in air pollution and global health, transportation-related and biomass air pollution. He has participated in monitoring and epidemiological studies throughout the world and served on advisory committees to the World Health Organization, the Climate and Clean Air Coalition, the US National Academy of Sciences, the Royal Society of Canada, the International Joint Commission and governments in North America and Asia. He is an Associate Editor of Environmental Health Perspectives and a member of the Core Analytic Team for the Global Burden of Disease.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered live at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and will be videoconferenced and webstreamed to allow for remote participation.

There are three ways to participate. Registration is required for each of them:

  • Attend in person at UBC -- Room 4127, Earth Sciences Building. RSVP required. 
  • Attend a regional videoconference location -- Locations listed on RSVP form.
  • Watch the webstream online -- RSVP required to obtain webstream link.

Speaker Info
Mary McBride
Program Leader, The Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivor Program (CAYACS)
BC Cancer Agency
Description

The goal of this research project is to generate and transfer knowledge of late effects and care of young cancer survivors to optimize survivor and care outcomes

Key objectives:

  • Develop a resource for childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancer survivorship research 
  • Determine risks and predictors of late-occurring and long term medical problems 
  • Examine patterns and quality of (health) care in relation to these risks 
  • Transfer knowledge for change in (health) care policy and practice

Data sources used and linked:

  • BC Cancer Agency: BC Cancer Registry, health records, oncology scheduling, BC screening mammography program, BC cervical cancer screening program, CAIS treatment summary 
  • MOH: MSP Consolidation file, hospital separations (DAD), MSP payment information, Home and Community Care, Mental Health, Vital Statistics Deaths 
  • BC College Pharmacists: PharmaNet 
  • Ministry of Education: FSA Achievement data 
  • Ministry of Advanced Education: Program data 
  • Statistics Canada: Longitudinal Tax filer files

Strengths and caveats associated with data use:

  • Strengths: Longitudinal, person-based, comprehensive, accurate, verified 
  • Caveats: Privacy issues and delays in access; gaps in data

Analytic techniques used:

  • Multivariate and Logistic Regression

Policy implications / key findings:

  • Health and healthcare impacts: 
    • Among Oncologists and other cancer specialists: 
      • Raise awareness of issues; identify treatment toxicities; contribute to clinical decision-making; inform survivor care guideline development; encourage research into treatment alternatives 
    • Among Family physicians and other care providers: 
      • Raise awareness of late complications; identify high-risk survivors; provide targeted risk-based care 
    • Among Policymakers and Managers: 
      • Identify workload, costs to the system of inappropriate care, roles of health care providers, and appropriate resources; support cost-effective models of care 
    • Among Survivors: 
      • Raise awareness of long-term issues for self-management

 

Speaker Bio:

Mary McBride's research interests include childhood and young adult cancer issues, non-ionizing radiation as a cause of cancer, and cancer registries. She is a member of the Agency's Paediatric Tumour Group, a committee member of the Cancer in Young People Surveillance Program of the Public Health Agency of Canada, and a member of the C17 Canadian childhood cancer research group. She has served on committees for the Ethics Office of the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. She was a member of an Expert Panel for the Royal Society of Canada in a review of potential health risks of radiofrequency fields from wireless communication devices (1999), and a member of an expert Advisory Committee for a National Tower Policy Review sponsored by Industry Canada (2005).

She is a member of several professional associations, including the Children's Cancer Group (COG) (a North-America-wide clinical research group for childhood cancer), and the International Society for Pediatric Oncology (an international professional society).

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered live at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and will be videoconferenced and webstreamed to allow for remote participation.

There are three ways to participate. Registration is required for each of them:

  • Attend in person at UBC -- Room 4127, Earth Sciences Building. RSVP required. 
  • Attend a regional videoconference location -- Locations listed on RSVP form.
  • Watch the webstream online -- RSVP required to obtain webstream link.

Speaker Info
Dr John Spinelli
Faculty of Medicine, School of Population and Public Health
University of British Columbia
Description

The Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project (CPTP) is a national, long-term study that will follow over 300,000 men and women for up to 50 years. The CPTP aims to investigate environmental, lifestyle and genetic factors related to the development of cancer and other chronic diseases. This cohort study has enrolled Canadians between the ages of 35 and 69 years old from British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, Quebec and the four Atlantic provinces. Participants have completed a baseline questionnaire and consented to future contact and linkage with administrative databases. Currently over 120,000 participants have also provided a blood and urine sample, and by 2017, samples will be collected from over 180,000 participants. The study has also collected baseline physical measurements on over 85,000 participants. The CPTP is by far the most ambitious and powerful platform ever created in Canada, and has been designed to be able to combine with other cohort studies around the world to answer questions on rare diseases or exposures. It will support novel, leading edge Canadian and international trans-disciplinary chronic disease research long into the future.

Data sources (to be) linked:

  • Self-report questionnaires on lifestyle, medical history and other chronic disease risk factors 
  • Physical measurements, including height, weight, blood pressure and body fat composition 
  • Genetic determinants of chronic disease from DNA (future) 
  • Biomarkers of exposure, lifestyle and disease from the biological samples (future) 
  • Vital Statistics 
  • Cancer Incidence 
  • Physician billing records 
  • Hospital discharge abstracts 
  • Prescription medications (in BC) 
  • Environmental data (water, air, neighborhood factors) linked to residential history (future) 
  • Occupational exposure data linked to job history (future)

Strengths and caveats associated with data use:

Prospective cohorts such as CPTP eliminate many of the weaknesses of other study designs as questionnaires and samples are obtained before the onset of disease. Although these cohorts are costly and may take decades or more before major results are obtained, they provide the gold standard for research into the causation and early detection of chronic diseases. In fact, because many diseases can be studied simultaneously, the cost over time per health outcome studied can be substantially lower than the cost of case–control studies for a comparable number of participants.

Impact to health policy and implications for related research:

For research:

  • The creation of a “population laboratory” for leading-edge, population-based basic and translational research related to cancer and chronic diseases within Canada. 
  • A bank of biologic specimens and related personal risk factor data that can be linked with provincial data on disease outcome and health care utilization. 
  • A resource and legacy for future generations of researchers that will continue to yield valuable information about health and risks of disease. 

For policy, prevention and care:

  • A platform that enables improvement in the control of cancer and the incidence of chronic disease through identification of new risk factors that may be modified through preventive interventions. 
  • A platform that enables reduction in disease-related mortality through detection of new prognostic factors and markers of early disease. 
  • An observatory for tracking the results of “natural experiments” occurring over time related to interprovincial variations in the introduction of new technologies, new programs for preventing disease or methods of health care delivery. 
  • A mechanism for predicting future needs for care, through the tracking of factors that are likely to predict future incidence of disease and related mortality, and the associated costs. 
  • A platform for investigating the policy issues associated with population studies. 
  • A mechanism for monitoring uptake of screening and prevention initiatives by the Canadian population and the impact of these initiatives.

 

Speaker Bio:

John Spinelli is the Head of Cancer Control Research at the BC Cancer Agency, Professor in the School of Population and Public Health at the University of British Columbia, and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science at Simon Fraser University. He is the principal investigator for the BC Generations Project, part of the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project, the largest health study ever undertaken in Canada.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered live at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and will be videoconferenced and webstreamed to allow for remote participation.

There are three ways to participate. Registration is required for each of them:

  • Attend in person at UBC -- Room 4127, Earth Sciences Building. RSVP required. 
  • Attend a regional videoconference location -- Locations listed on RSVP form.
  • Watch the webstream online -- RSVP required to obtain webstream link.

Speaker Info
Reka Pataky
Health Economist and Data Lead
Canadian Centre for Applied Research in Cancer Control (ARCC)
,
Hsien Seow
Associate Professor
McMaster University
Description

Providing homecare nursing to cancer patients in the last months of life can potentially improve the quality and reduce the cost of end-of-life (EOL) care. Previous work in Ontario found a strong association between increased homecare nursing use and decreased risk of hospitalization in the last two weeks of life. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the same relationship between homecare nursing and hospitalization exists across three Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Ontario and Nova Scotia) for cancer patients in the last 6 months of life, and to extend the analysis to measure the relationship between homecare nursing and hospitalization costs.

Data sources and analysis

Each province identified a cohort of cancer decedents, with death dates between 2004 and 2009, from their respective cancer registries. The outcomes of interest, hospital admission rate and hospitalization cost, were defined using the CIHI Discharge Abstract Database. The exposure of interest, homecare nursing rate, was defined by each province separately using their available homecare nursing data. In BC, the BC Cancer Agency and the BC Ministry of Health approved access to and use of the data facilitated by Population Data BC.

The association between homecare nursing rate in a given week and hospitalization rate in the subsequent week was analyzed using Poisson regression under a generalized estimating equations approach, adjusting for age, sex, cancer site, comorbidity, neighborhood income, community size, and palliative indication. Preliminary cost analysis is currently underway.

Strengths and caveats associated with data analysis process

The primary challenge that the study team encountered was the difference in homecare nursing program structure, and consequently data structure, in the three provinces. However, despite differences in how each province’s homecare nursing rate was defined, the observed associations were similar, strengthening the generalizability of results. Receiving nursing with palliative intent in the last six months of life significantly reduced the risk of hospitalization, while in the last month of life, increased homecare nursing, regardless of indication, decreased hospitalization.

Impact to health policy and implications for related research

To improve end-of-life cancer care, policymakers should consider prioritizing palliative homecare nursing services to manage symptoms in the last months of life, and support policies to provide easier access to more homecare nursing during the last month of life as the complexity and burden of symptoms increases.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered live at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and will be videoconferenced and webstreamed to allow for remote participation.

There are three ways to participate. Registration is required for each of them:

  • Attend in person at UBC -- Room 4127, Earth Sciences Building. RSVP required. 
  • Attend a regional videoconference location -- Locations listed on RSVP form.
  • Watch the webstream online -- RSVP required to obtain webstream link.

Speaker Info
Dr Mieke Koehoorn
Faculty of Medicine, School of Population and Public Health
University of British Columbia
Description

The key focus of my program of research is the use of workers’ compensation claims data, linked to other databases, for policy-relevant research on work and health. As co-lead of the Partnership for Work, Health and Safety at the University of British Columbia and professor in the university's School of Population and Public Health, I will share examples of the contribution of research to informing workers' compensation policy and programs in British Columbia, Canada. Research examples include the surveillance of occupational injuries and cancers, the occupational epidemiology of cardiovascular disease among emergency workers, and the evaluation of compensation policies and procedures, including the effect of expedited surgical fees and private surgical clinics on work disability duration and the effect of faller certification on injury rates in the forestry sector. I also hold a research chair in gender, work and health and will discuss the importance of integrating sex and gender based analysis in workers’ compensation research. Finally, the talk will discuss the potential use of the linked health data for comparative research across compensation systems in Canada and with other jurisdictions.

Data sources linked

  • Data sources used and linked: Workers’ compensation claims data, linked to medical services, hospitalizations, cancer registry, vital statistics and other ‘external’ work-related databases. 
  • Strengths and caveats associated with data use: Key strengths are the rich and longitudinal nature of the workers’ compensation data for evaluation of programs and policies on work injury, illness and disability outcome over time in British Columbia, as well as the ability to link the claims data to other data sources for adjustment of key variables such as co-morbidity; caveats are limited employment and work variables (as major determinants of health) at the population-level, beyond claims data for injured and ill workers, for population-based workforce studies and comparisons. 
  • Analytic techniques used: Various different statistical models depending upon the outcome and research question, including logistic and linear regression, quantile regression, random effects Poisson regression, discrete time survival analysis…

Policy implications / key findings

  • Administrative data matters for having a policy or program impact, in particular in providing population-based evidence in a local context that resonates with the decision maker (in my case, with decision makers in the workers’ compensation system); and supporting public access models to use this data for research purposes is the way forward; 
  • For research evidence to inform and impact policies and programs the researcher-policymaker relationship needs to be a long-term, committed one with a long-term view of the impact of research evidence (i.e. research evidence needs to ‘percolate’ into decision making).

 

Speaker Bio:

Mieke Koehoorn's program of research focuses on current and emerging issues in occupational health, and covers issues related to the surveillance of occupational injury/disease, the epidemiology of occupational injury and disease, and the evaluation of workers’ compensation policies. She also has a special interest in developing and linking data to enable cutting-edge research on occupational epidemiology. For surveillance, she is currently involved in research projects investigating the patterns of work-related respiratory conditions such as asthma and mesothelioma. For epidemiology, she is currently involved in research projects investigating the relationship between occupational exposures and cardiovascular disease among emergency workers. And for policy evaluation, she is currently involved in research projects evaluating the effect of industry certification on injury risk in tree-fallers a d surgical setting/wait-times on return-to-work outcomes.

She currently holds a CIHR Chair in Gender, Work and Health, with a focus on investigating differences in occupational health and workers’ compensation outcomes by gender/sex.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

There are three ways to participate. Registration is required for each of them:

  • In person at the University of New Brunswick, Room: D'Avray 126 -- RSVP required.
  • Attend a regional videoconference location (interactivity / Q&A ability supported) -- Locations listed on RSVP form.
  • Watch the webstream online (no Q&A ability, viewers can only watch presentation) -- RSVP required to obtain webstream link.

Speaker Info
Dr Amanda Slaunwhite
Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of New Brunswick
Collaborating Scientist, Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, University of Victoria
Description

In the past 5 years there has been a renewed focus on the importance of primary health care to reducing health inequities through regular screening and health promotion counselling that work to detect illnesses early in their development and address negative health behaviours among patient populations. The importance of primary health care to the identification of persons at risk of developing mental and physical health conditions is highly apparent in relation to alcohol consumption, which is a significant contributor to premature mortality in Canada. Previous research on health care use and alcohol consumption in BC has focused on secondary and tertiary level services that are accessed by only a small proportion of all at-risk drinkers in the province. The purpose of this project was to address this significant knowledge gap by measuring variations in general practitioner visits for alcohol-attributed diseases using physician-billing data from 2001-2011.

Data sources:

  • Medical Services Plan Collection (BC Ministry of Health) 2001-2011 
  • Registry Collection 2001-2011 
  • Registry Demographics Collection 2001-2011

Data analysis:

Data were modeled using negative binomial regression to measure trends in the cases and visits to general practitioners for alcohol-attributed diseases, and identify regional variations in consultations over the ten-year period.

Policy implications:

This project was developed to address the lack of information on primary health care utilization by persons with substance use issues in BC - and Canada more generally - given the recent focus on leveraging opportunities in family physician practices to encourage greater use of screening tools and brief interventions. This is the first known project to examine alcohol-attributed diseases in BC – and Canada - using multi-year administrative primary health care data. One of the central policy implications of this project is that there is far greater utilization of general practitioners services for alcohol-attributed diseases than hospitals, and that consultations in primary health care practices have been significantly increasing since 2001. These findings support the further use of primary health care data for understanding the incidence of substance use-related diseases in BC.

Key findings: 

  • Since 2001 there have been significant increases in the number of persons presenting to general practitioners with alcohol-attributed diseases in all Health Authorities. General practitioner visits for alcohol-attributed diseases significantly increased by 53.3% from 14,882 cases in 2001 to 22,823 cases in 2011 (p<.001). Most visits to general practitioners for alcohol-attributed diseases were for alcohol dependency syndrome (86%). 
  • While the number of AAD cases increased from 2001-2011, the frequency of visits to general practitioners significantly decreased from 3.9 in 2001 to 2.7 visits per case in 2011 (F=428.1, p<.001) 
  • Most (65%) general practitioner consultations took place in a family doctor’s office in the community; however there were some marked variations in the service locations of general practitioner visits based on disease type and region. 
  • Most rural and northern areas of BC had above average rates of general practitioner consults for alcohol-attributed diseases, and a much higher proportion of these visits took place in emergency rooms and hospital settings. 
  • From January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2011 some of the largest increases in alcohol-related disease cases were in rural or remote Health Service Delivery Areas (HSDAs). In the Northwest HSDA cases rose 77.2% from 57.1 per 10,000 in 2001 to 101.3 per 10,000 in 2011. The 2011 rate of AAD cases per 10,000 in the Northwest HSDA was the highest in the province - almost double the provincial HSDA average of 48.2 AAD cases per 10,000.

 

Speaker Bio:

Amanda Slaunwhite is a Research Affiliate of the Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia. Her research contributions have focused on identifying new and emerging methods for answering some of the most important health services issues in the area of mental health, including how to improve access to services in rural and remote places.

She has contributed to projects at the BC Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing, Canadian Policy Research Networks, Queen's University, the Social Planning Council of Kingston and Area, Dalhousie University, and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

Date:
Location

Webinar connection details will be emailed to all registered participants.

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

This 1 hour long webinar will talk about batch visualization on Compute Canada clusters, in which rendering can be done in the background with either an interactive script or a scheduled job, without any GUI interaction. The basics of writing scripts using ParaView's Python, porting them to an HPC cluster, and submitting them to the job scheduler will also be covered. Depending on time, in-situ visualization using Catalyst and interactive viewing of pre-rendered images in ParaView Cinema may also be discussed briefly.

This webinar is for any current WestGrid / Compute Canada user. No prior vizualization experience required! We will be using WestGrid's Parallel cluster for the demonstrations. 

 

Links to the slides and exercises from the presentation:

 

 

 

Image sourced from Bluefin Labs. The image is a data visualization from the TV Genome. This image does not relate directly to the material that will be discussed in WestGrid's webinar, instead it is meant to provide an example of what a data visualization could look like.

Registration open for 2014 Fall WestGrid Data Visualization Workshops
Date:
Tuesday, February 24, 2015 - 17:00 MST to Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 0:30 MST
Location

Room 516
ICT Building

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

WestGrid is pleased to present a free hands-on workshop on scientific visualization using ParaView. All disciplines and experience levels are welcome. You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing data sets is invited to attend.

ParaView is an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization application. ParaView users can quickly build visualizations to analyze their data using qualitative and quantitative techniques. This workshop will explore the basics of scientific visualization with 2- and 3-dimensional data sets through hands-on exercises.

Attendees will need to bring a laptop and should have ParaView installed on their laptop before the workshop. Wireless networking will be available during the workshop.

Workshop Outline:

  • Scientific visualization overview
  • ParaView interface
  • 2D and 3D visualization
  • Volume rendering
  • Data sets and formats
  • Putting it all together
  • Visualization resources at WestGrid, Compute Canada
  • Remote visualization using WestGrid resources
Date:
Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 20:00 MDT to Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 22:00 MDT
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Kamil Marcinkowski
WestGrid Site Lead / System Administrator
University of Alberta
Description

This online workshop is targeted at current WestGrid account holders and focuses on getting the most out of a cluster using a scheduler. Split into three-parts, each two-hour session will provide hands-on training and offer users a chance to experiment with job submission techniques.

Part 1 will discuss how a scheduler works and how to use the knowledge to your advantage. Participants will practice how to submit basic jobs, with a focus on productivity. Other topics covered include:

    • optimizing walltime 
    • MPI and OpenMP jobs 
    • job arrays 
    • interactive jobs

Part 2 will discuss how to submit and run more advanced jobs. Participants will practice examining jobs, and understand their state. Knowledge and practice of the topics covered in Part 1 is a prerequisite for attending this workshop. Other topics covered include:

    • jobs and memory 
    • partitions 
    • gpus 
    • software licenses, job dependencies, accounting groups and advanced requests

Part 3 will discuss how a cluster chooses which jobs are to be run first by examining the topics of fairness, priority, and reservations. Participants will examine the state of the cluster and their jobs in order to troubleshoot problems. Knowledge and practice of the topics covered in Parts 1 and 2 is a prerequisite for attending this workshop.

Workshop Materials:

Who Should Attend:
This session is intended for current WestGrid account holders who have had some experience submitting jobs but would like to learn how to increase their job productivity and efficiency. Familiarity with logging in to WestGrid systems, using UNIX and basic job script commands is recommended.

Pre-requisite Knowledge and Requirements:

  • You must have a WestGrid account to participate in this session. To register for an account, visit this page. 
  • Basic knowledge of Unix/Linux and scripting (or similar experience) is required. Participants should know: 
    • What a man page is 
    • How to edit, copy, and delete files 
    • How to use top and ps to see resources used of a process 
    • What unix environment variables are, how to set and display them

 

 If you have any questions about this session or would like more information, please contact us.

 

Date:
Location

Sheraton Vancouver Wall Centre Hotel
Parksville Room
1088 Burrard Street

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada is co-hosting a series of community consultations with the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s (CFI) on its Cyberinfrastructure Initiative. The sessions will be divided between the CFI consultation followed by a Compute Canada-led session on the draft hardware infrastructure plan for the Challenge Two - Stage One CyberInfrastructure Call. 

Canadian researchers are encouraged to participate in these consultation sessions to actively participate in shaping the future of advanced research computing in Canada. For more information on the sessions and Compute Canada's role, email info@computecanada.ca

Date:
Location

Best Western Village Park Inn 
Foothills 2 Room
1804 Crowchild Trail NW

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada is co-hosting a series of community consultations with the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s (CFI) on its Cyberinfrastructure Initiative. The sessions will be divided between the CFI consultation followed by a Compute Canada-led session on the draft hardware infrastructure plan for the Challenge Two - Stage One CyberInfrastructure Call. 

Canadian researchers are encouraged to participate in these consultation sessions to actively participate in shaping the future of advanced research computing in Canada. For more information on the sessions and Compute Canada's role, email info@computecanada.ca

Date:
Location

Hilton Garden Inn Saskatoon 
Garden North Room 
90 22nd Street East

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada is co-hosting a series of community consultations with the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s (CFI) on its Cyberinfrastructure Initiative. The sessions will be divided between the CFI consultation followed by a Compute Canada-led session on the draft hardware infrastructure plan for the Challenge Two - Stage One CyberInfrastructure Call. 

Canadian researchers are encouraged to participate in these consultation sessions to actively participate in shaping the future of advanced research computing in Canada. For more information on the sessions and Compute Canada's role, email info@computecanada.ca

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada is hosting an online community consultation session on Monday, January 26 to share the details of its Phase 1 Renewal Plan. Members of the research community across Canada are encouraged to attend and contribute feedback on this important activity.

How to Participate

There are two ways to connect to this meeting:

If you are unable to watch via webcast or attend at one of the designated locations, or if your institution is not listed as having a videoconference location, alternative connection methods are available. Please contact vidyo@computecanada.ca for more information.

Questions / Discussion

During the consultation, there will be an opportunity to pose and discuss questions. Depending on your method of connection, please follow these instructions for participating in the conversation:

  • Campus videoconference participants: 
    Please signal the on-site technical lead, who will alert the presenter there is a question from the site.
  • Webstream viewers: 
    Please email your questions to onlineconsultation@computecanada.ca. These will be passed along to the speaker to address.

Please contact Compute Canada if you have any questions or require any additional information to participate in this important consultation.

Date:
Location

Webinar via Vidyo (desktop/mobile videoconference)

Registation / More Information:

Registration is limited to 25 participants. Please register by Monday March 23 by clicking HERE.

 

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions.

Speaker Info
Hossein Pourreza
University of Manitoba
Description

This two-hour, online workshop explores how to use OpenMP to improve the speed of serial jobs on multi-core machines. Participants are led through a series of hands-on, interactive examples during the workshop, focusing on multi-threading parallel programming. 

The topics covered include:

  • basic OpenMP operations
  • loops
  • 
reduction variables


Who Should Attend:

This session is intended for current WestGrid account holders who have had some experience with programming in C/C++ or FORTRAN and would like to learn how to use OpenMP directives in their code. Familiarity with logging in to WestGrid systems, using UNIX and basic job script commands is recommended. 

Date:
Location

Room CLEA015
University of Victoria

Speaker Info
John Simpson
Digital Humanities Specialist
Compute Canada
Description

Targeting digital humanities researchers who are new to Compute Canada and its services, this introductory tutorial/workshop will share a range of use cases and methods from the spectrum of disciplines that make up the digital humanities. Opportunities will exist for hands-on work and sandboxing and attendees can expect to walk away with access to - and introductory training in - Compute Canada installations of ownCloud, Globus, Vidyo, and a virtual machine cloud environment.

Attendees should bring their own laptop to ensure that they are able to easily take their accomplishments with them when the workshop is over.

Compute Canada's full offerings currently include:

  • Open services (available to any researcher with a Compute Canada account): 
    • OwnCloud. 50Gb of shareable, dropbox-like space available across multiple devices. 
    • Globus. Fast, secure, fire-and-forget data transfer for large files and large file sets. 
    • Vidyo. Simple to use, fault-tolerant, video conferencing. 
    • Cloud. Virtual-machine based development space that includes an outward-facing IP address. 
    • Data Integrity. Data storage and back-up systems provide stability and security options over your desktop. 
    • General Analyst/Consultant Support. Consultations regarding project architecture and resource needs. 
    • DH Support. Dedicated digital humanities expert available. 
    • Visualization Support. Dedicated 3D visualization expert available. 
    • Training. Training sessions covering core skills offered regularly and custom courses available on request.

  • Allocation-based services (available to researchers with a Compute Canada account following a resource allocation process): 
    • Portals. Hosting for specialized data and tools for entire research communities. 
    • Archival Storage. Robust storage solutions, including tape backup. 
    • Specialized Software. Over 250 software programs and packages already integrated with Compute Canada systems. 
    • Computation. Expandable power ranging from the equivalent of a second desktop to access to machines with thousands of cores, terabytes of RAM, and a variety of system architectures, including GPUs.
Date:
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 7:00 PDT to Friday, June 19, 2015 - 7:00 PDT
Location

University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

The Digital Humanities Summer Institute provides an ideal environment for discussing and learning about new computing technologies and how they are influencing teaching, research, dissemination, creation, and preservation in different disciplines, via a community-based approach. A time of intensive coursework, seminars, and lectures, participants at DHSI share ideas and methods, and develop expertise in using advanced technologies. Every summer, the institute brings together faculty, staff, and students from the Arts, Humanities, Library, and Archives communities as well as independent scholars and participants from areas beyond. We invite you to join the DHSI community in Victoria for a time of focused practice, learning, and connecting with (and making new) friends and colleagues.

SC15
Date:
Sunday, November 15, 2015 - 8:00 CST to Friday, November 20, 2015 - 8:00 CST
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

For its 27th anniversary, the annual SC Conference will return to Austin, TX, a city that continues to develop new ways of engaging our senses and incubating technology of all types, including supercomputing. SC15 will yet again provide a unique venue for spotlighting HPC and scientific applications, and innovations from around the world. SC15 will bring together the international supercomputing community—an unparalleled ensemble of scientists, engineers, researchers, educators, programmers, system administrators and developers—for an exceptional program of technical papers, informative tutorials, timely research posters and Birds-of-a-Feather (BOF) sessions. The SC15 Exhibition Hall will feature exhibits of the latest and greatest technologies from industry, academia and government research organizations; many of these technologies making their debut in Austin. No conference is better poised to demonstrate how HPC can transform both the everyday and the incredible.

Compute Ontario Research Day 2015
Date:
Location

Cambridge Campus (850 Fountain Street South)
Conestoga College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Sponsored by Compute Canada and Compute Ontario, this is a collaborative event between SHARCNET, SciNet, HPCVL, and Conestoga College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning. Compute Ontario Research Day 2015 is the preeminent provincial high performance computing event at which professors, postdoctoral, graduate, and undergraduate students gather to learn about each other's high performance computing related work.

The conference will consist of:

  • two invited keynote presentations 
  • contributed and select presentations from various fields that use high performance computing, such as: 
  • computer science, algorithms, and methods 
  • computational finance and statistics 
  • applied mathematics 
  • computational chemistry and biology 
  • computational physics 
  • computational fluid dynamics and engineering 
  • health science 
  • digital humanities 
  • poster presentations, with a competition for best posters in several categories

The conference is free to attend, but does require registration. We welcome everybody, not just participants from Ontario. As a geographically local meeting, however, Compute Ontario Research Day 2015 is an excellent opportunity for students to advertise their projects. We anticipate offering a prize for best student presentation and/or best student poster.

Important Dates

  • May 1: deadline for contributed presentation abstracts (submit an abstract)
  • May 5: notification of acceptance for contributed and poster presentations
  • May 6: release of final program
  • May 8: deadline for poster presentation abstracts (submit an abstract)
  • May 12: notification of acceptance for poster presentations
  • May 19: attendee registration ends
  • May 21: the conference

If you have any questions regarding the conference, please contact Dalibor Dvorski at ddvorski@conestogac.on.ca.

PCFD 2015
Date:
Sunday, May 17, 2015 - 7:00 EDT to Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 7:00 EDT
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Parallel CFD is an annual conference series dedicated to the discussion of recent developments and applications of parallel computing in the field of CFD and related disciplines. Since the inaugural conference in 1989, many new developments and technologies have emerged. The intervening years have also proved to be extremely volatile for many hardware vendors and a number of companies appeared and then disappeared. However, the belief that parallel computing is the only way forward has remained undiminished. Supercomputers or High Performance Computers in recent terminology all utilize parallel architectures and parallel processing. Parallel technology developed for these machines are now applied to broadband of parallel computers. Moreover, the increasing reliability and acceptance of parallel computers has seen many commercial companies now offering parallel versions of their codes for parallel processors. It is clear that industry is moving to parallel systems and it has shown a keen interest in parallel systems recognizing that parallel computing will play an important role in the future.

Over the years, the meeting sessions involved papers on parallel algorithms, developments in software tools and environments, unstructured mesh applications, combustion, industrial applications, climate modeling, atmospheric and oceanic global simulation, interdisciplinary application, and evaluation of computer architectures ranging from high-end to low-end systems.

The C2C seminar will explore &quot;Big Data&quot; problems faced by researchers examining the immune response to infectious and autoimmune diseases
Date:
Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 7:00 EDT to Friday, April 17, 2015 - 7:00 EDT
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

The overarching goals of this meeting are to create opportunities for networking generating collaborative projects that answer pressing health questions regarding human disease.

  • Highlight the data and resources of International, national and regional cohorts to potential users
  • Identify key issues in the interpretation and analysis of big, heterogeneous datasets and offer strategies to overcome these challenges
  • Inform local and national governments and funding agencies of the value of cohorts and genomics (and “omics”) for data-driven healthcare and efficient use of research budgets
  • Promote collaborations and networking opportunities
  • Produce a white paper with recommendations for addressing some of the challenges identified and for knowledge translation across the community
Date:
Thursday, April 9, 2015 - 7:00 PDT to Friday, April 10, 2015 - 7:00 PDT
Location

IRMACS Centre
Simon Fraser University

Registation / More Information:

Contact Pam Borghardt at pam@irmacs.sfu.ca for more information. Or visit:
http://www.irmacs.sfu.ca/events/10th_IRMACS_Day

Speaker Info
Description

IRMACS Day will take on an exciting new look this year. In celebration of two milestones - IRMACS' 10th anniversary and the lead up to SFU's 50th anniversary year - the Office of the Vice-President, Research and the IRMACS Centre are pleased to co-host a two-day event showcasing interdisciplinary research and innovation at SFU.

We hope that you will be able to join us and our distinguished guests! Please mark your calendars and register for these free public events.

IRMACS Days

Schedule - Thursday, April 9

  • Interdisciplinary Centres and Institutes: Opportunities and Challenges Workshop
    (co-hosted by the IRMACS Centre and the Faculty of Environment)
    Join colleagues from across Canada and beyond our borders to discuss how, regardless of their size, their host universities, or their fields of research, interdisciplinary centres and institutes have many things in common.
    "Interdisciplinarity, Multidisciplinarity and Transdisciplinarity: The Present and the Future"
    Time: 13:00 - 14:20
    Open to the public - Please register

Schedule - Friday, April 10

  • Celebrating Creative Collaboration and Innovation @ SFU
    (co-hosted by the IRMACS Centre and the Office of the VP Research)
    Join SFU VP Research Joy Johnson, CIHR President Alain Beaudet, SSHRC President Ted Hewitt, NSERC Director of Research Grants and Scholarships Directorate, Enikö Megyeri-Lawless, in a roundtable discussion about research innovation. This day will also feature PechaKucha presentations and invited speakers to showcase how 50 years of evolution at SFU and 10 years of interdisciplinary research at IRMACS have "powered up" creative collaboration and innovation.
    Open to the public - Please register

All events will take place at the IRMACS Centre, Simon Fraser University

Image Analysis with Matlab
Date:
Location

University of Alberta,

Engineering Teaching and Learning Complex (ETLC) 2-005

Registation / More Information:

For more information and registration, visit:

http://videreanalytics.ca/events/image-analysis-with-matlab/

Speaker Info
Denise Thornton and Dr. Jon Johansson
Videre Analytics Ltd
Description

The Advanced Materials & Processing Laboratory at the University of Alberta and Videre Analytics are offering researchers a workshop on Image Analysis with Matlab. The discussion will include techniques for quantitative extraction of data from 2D images and volume data stored as 3D image stacks. Participants will work with data to solve selected problems.

Matlab is commercial software available through Mathworks. Go to http://www.mathworks.com/products/matlab/ for more info about Matlab.

There is no charge and coffee and roundish sweet things will be served.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Registration is limited to 30 participants. Please register by Friday May 22 by clicking HERE.

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions. 

 

Speaker Info
Hossein Pourreza
University of Manitoba
Description

This 90-minute, webinar builds on a previous workshop - Introduction to OpenMP - presented in March 2015 (CLICK HERE to view the archived recording and materials from this presentation). 

This session will delve deeper into using OpenMP and introduce new directives to tackle hard to parallelize problems better. Participants will be led through a series of hands-on, interactive examples on the Grex system during the workshop, focusing on the following topics:

  • Review of the loop parallelism 
  • Load balancing

  • Conditional multithreading

  • Non-loop parallelism (tasks)

  • Intro to OpenMP 4.0 features (time permitting)


Who Should Attend:

This session is intended for current WestGrid account holders who have had some experience with programming in C/C++ or Fortran and would like to learn how to use OpenMP directives in their code. Familiarity with logging in to WestGrid systems, using UNIX and basic job script commands is recommended. 

Toronto is hosting this year&#039;s International HPC Summer School
Date:
Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 16:00 EDT to Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 0:00 EDT
Location

University of Toronto, Medical Sciences Building

Registation / More Information:

Interested students should apply by March 11, 2015. Meals, housing, and travel will be covered for the selected participants. Applications from graduate students and postdocs in all science and engineering fields are welcome. Preference will be given to applicants with parallel programming experience, and a research plan that will benefit from the utilization of high performance computing systems.

Speaker Info
Description

Graduate students and postdoctoral scholars from institutions in Canada, Europe, Japan and the United States are invited to apply for the sixth International Summer School on HPC Challenges in Computational Sciences, to be held June 21-26, 2015, in Toronto, Canada. Applications are due March 11, 2015. The summer school is sponsored by Compute Canada, the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) with funds from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe (PRACE) and the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (RIKEN AICS).

Leading Canadian, European, Japanese and American computational scientists and HPC technologists will offer instruction on a variety of topics, including:

  • HPC challenges by discipline (e.g, earth, life and materials sciences, physics)
  • HPC Programming Proficiencies
  • Performance analysis and profiling
  • Algorithmic approaches and numerical libraries
  • Data-intensive computing
  • Scientific visualization
  • Canadian, EU, Japanese and U.S. HPC-infrastructures

The expense-paid program will benefit advanced scholars from Canadian, European, Japanese and U.S. institutions who use HPC to conduct research. 

More Information

https://ihpcss2015.computecanada.ca/wp/

Research Data Management Week 2015
Date:
Monday, May 4, 2015 - 7:00 MDT to Friday, May 8, 2015 - 7:00 MDT
Location

University of Alberta

Speaker Info
Description

Researchers at the University of Alberta are invited to participate in a series of talks and workshops as part of Research Data Management Week (May 4 to May 8, 2015). This is an opportunity to discover best practices, new tools, and campus services regarding data management through thirty different talks and workshops. The topics covered will be of value to every researcher on campus.

Highlights:

  • High Performance Computing Workshop 2015 
    • Compute Canada and WestGrid User Training Seminars
  • Plenary Talks
    • The Perils and Prospects of Digital Scholarship in 21st Century Canada
    • Virtual Research Environments and the Management of Data: The Case of Semantic Collaborative Corpora Analysis
    • Large Data Transfers and Mirroring: Technologies and Their Implications
    • Dealing with the Crowd: Managing Data from Citizen Science and Crowdsourcing Projects

Take advantage of this free event and register now!

Visualization Example - SFU Workshop May 2015
Date:
Location

Room 10900, IRMACS Centre, Applied Science Building
Simon Fraser University

Registation / More Information:

To register online, visit: http://bit.ly/sfuvis

For more information, please contact info@westgrid.ca.

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
,
Jean-Sebastien Mercier
Managing Director
Vancouver Institute for Visual Analytics
Description

WestGrid, the IRMACS Centre, and the Vancouver Institute for Visual Analytics (VIVA) are pleased to present a free hands-on workshop on scientific visualization and visual anlytics. All disciplines and experience levels are welcome. You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing and interpreting data sets is invited to attend.

WestGrid's portion of the workshop will focus on  ParaView, an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization application. ParaView users can quickly build visualizations to analyze their data using qualitative and quantitative techniques. This workshop will explore the basics of creating 2- and 3-dimensional visualizations through hands-on exercises. Attendees will need to bring a laptop and should have ParaView installed on their laptop before the workshop. Wireless networking will be available during the workshop.

VIVA's portion of the workshop will focus on how to use visual analytics tools such as Trifacta, Tableau Public and Lumira Cloud. 

Workshop Highlights:

  • Scientific visualization overview 
  • ParaView overview.
        Includes discussion of:  
    • Volume rendering 
    • Data sets and formats 
    • 2D and 3D visualization
    • Creating a visualization pipeline
    • Python scripting in ParaView
    • Animation
    • Putting it all together
    • Remote visualization
  • Visual Analytics overview.
        Includes discussion of:
    • Using visual analytics for data wrangling: Trifacta
    • Using visual anaytics for data exploration: Tableau Public and Lumira Cloud
    • Visual analytics and statistics: how to avoid pitfalls

Workshop Agenda:

  • 9:00 am - 12:00 pm -- Scientific visualization overview and ParaView topics (includes a mid-morning refreshment break)
  • 12:00 - 1:00 pm -- Lunch (attendees are responsible for their own lunch)
  • 1:00 - 2:15 pm -- ParaView topics
  • 2:15 - 2:30 pm -- Break 
  • 2:30 - 4:30 pm -- Visual analytics topics
Date:
Location

University of Alberta, Engineering Teaching and Learning Complex (ETLC) 2-005

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Denise Thornton and Dr. Jon Johansson
Videre Analytics Ltd.
Description

Are you interested in analysis of 2D images and 3D image stacks? If so, you're in luck because we are having a workshop!

The Advanced Materials & Processing Laboratory at the University of Alberta and Videre Analytics are offering researchers a workshop on Image Analysis with Matlab. The discussion will include techniques for quantitative extraction of data from 2D images and volume data stored as 3D image stacks. Participants will work with data to solve selected problems.

Matlab is commercial software available through Mathworks. Go to http://www.mathworks.com/products/matlab/ for more info about Matlab.

There is no charge and coffee and roundish sweet things will be served.

Ontario Summer School
Date:
Monday, July 13, 2015 - 7:00 EDT to Friday, July 17, 2015 - 7:00 EDT
Location

University of Toronto

Speaker Info
Description

The Summer School on High Performance and Technical Computing is an annual educational event for graduate/undergraduate students, postdocs and researchers in the areas of computational science. Held geographically in the west, central and east of the province of Ontario, the summer school provides attendees with irreplaceable opportunities to learn and share knowledge and experience in high performance and technical computing on platforms with the latest technologies. The five full day summer school offers intensive courses on a number of selected subjects, including

  • Introduction to the Unix the cluster environment; 
  • Programming distributed systems using message passing; 
  • Programming shared memory systems with threads; 
  • Programming GPGPUs; 
  • Common programming languages: Modern Fortran, C/C++, Java, etc.; 
  • Parallel computing: theory and practice; 
  • Debugging and profiling; 
  • Using packages and libraries for scientific and engineering computing 
  • Visualization; 
  • and others.

The five day summer school will include both in-class lectures and hands-on computer labs on programming distributed and shared memory systems, as well as GPGPUs. Those who attend at least three full days cumulatively will receive an official certificate in HPC training.

Ontario Summer School
Date:
Monday, July 27, 2015 - 7:00 EDT to Friday, July 31, 2015 - 7:00 EDT
Location

Queen's University

Speaker Info
Description

The Summer School on High Performance and Technical Computing is an annual educational event for graduate/undergraduate students, postdocs and researchers in the areas of computational science. Held geographically in the west, central and east of the province of Ontario, the summer school provides attendees with irreplaceable opportunities to learn and share knowledge and experience in high performance and technical computing on platforms with the latest technologies. The five full day summer school offers intensive courses on a number of selected subjects, including

  • Introduction to the Unix the cluster environment; 
  • Programming distributed systems using message passing; 
  • Programming shared memory systems with threads; 
  • Programming GPGPUs; 
  • Common programming languages: Modern Fortran, C/C++, Java, etc.; 
  • Parallel computing: theory and practice; 
  • Debugging and profiling; 
  • Using packages and libraries for scientific and engineering computing 
  • Visualization; 
  • and others.

The five day summer school will include both in-class lectures and hands-on computer labs on programming distributed and shared memory systems, as well as GPGPUs. Those who attend at least three full days cumulatively will receive an official certificate in HPC training.

Date:
Location

Senate Room, 7th Floor, Hotel Alma
University of Calgary

Registation / More Information:

Please RSVP in advance of this session. If you have any questions or require more information, please contact info@westgrid.ca.

Speaker Info
Description

As part of its second Sustainable Planning for Advanced Research Computing (SPARC) initiative and in preparation for future submissions to the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), Compute Canada is asking for feedback from the broad research community on its data storage requirements and high performance computing needs over the next five years.

Who Should Participate?
Any WestGrid / Compute Canada user (or future user) as well as members of the broader research community from all disciplines (i.e. faculty, grad students, VPR/AVPR, Research Services Office, IT staff, industry, government, funders, etc.) are invited and encouraged to participate. No RSVP is required to attend.

In addition to this in-person consultation session, members of the Canadian research community can also get involved by:

For more information on the SPARC2 consultation process, visit the Compute Canada website.

Date:
Sunday, June 19, 2016 - 7:00 MDT to Wednesday, June 22, 2016 - 7:00 MDT
Location

University of Alberta

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Join Canada’s largest gathering of campus IT leaders and advanced research computing experts and researchers. CANHEIT | HPCS 2016 combines two annual national conferences: CANHEIT, under the direction of CUCCIO, and the High Performance Computing Symposium (HPCS), under the direction of Compute Canada.

CANHEIT | HPCS 2016 offers a unique opportunity to connect, collaborate and share best practices in higher education IT and data-intensive, computational research. Lead the discussion around ways to advance national initiatives, strategies and vision for building world-class digital infrastructure in Canada.

Registation is now open and a program-at-a-glance is available online.

Keynote speakers include:

  • Rebecca Costa, \ Expert in Adaptive Management & Technologies
  • Jon Montgomery, Host of CTV’s Amazing Race and a former Olympian
  • Julielynn Wong, Director, Centre for Innovative Technologies and Public Health
Date:
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 7:00 EDT to Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 7:00 EDT
Location

Fairmont Château Laurier

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Emerging Technologies: The Path and the Potential for Canada

Mark your calendars for two exceptional days when leaders from academia, industry and government will come together to explore the emerging technologies that will shape the lives of Canadians. Learn about the latest discoveries in robotics, wearables and medical technologies from Canada’s trailblazing researchers and innovators and contribute to the discussions on our potential to make Canada a leader in the global knowledge economy.

LEARN
Learn about ground-breaking Canadian scientific discoveries that will shape our lives

BUILD
Build new, cross-sector and cross-technology relationships through networking opportunities

CONTRIBUTE
Contribute your thoughts and ideas to help shape Canada into a technological powerhouse on the world stage

Date:
Monday, October 5, 2015 - 7:00 ADT to Friday, October 9, 2015 - 7:00 ADT
Location

World Trade and Convention Centre (WTCC)

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Digital Earth concerns the integrated use of digital technologies to monitor, map, model, and manage our planet’s environments. The Digital Earth vision was first proposed by Al Gore in 1998, and has evolved to keep pace with rapid developments in earth-sensing, cloud computing, and Big Data. ISDE now espouses a more dynamic view of Digital Earth as the digital nervous system of the globe, using sensor networks and situation-aware systems to inform in real-time about events on or close to the Earth’s surface.

At Digital Earth 2015 up to 1,000 scientists, engineers, technologists, and environmental managers from around the world will meet to share concepts, research findings, technologies, and practical applications relating to the Digital Earth vision. Our conference will include themes from the entire spectrum of the Digital Earth vision, and will highlight applications related to Nova Scotian expertise in ocean and atmospheric sciences.

Canada is in the forefront of research and development in the fields of geomatics, geospatial research, and environmental monitoring. Nova Scotia has a large cluster of agencies and institutions related to geomatics, digital technologies, and the environment, with regional and specialist agencies of many government departments, and world-class research at local universities and colleges.

Date:
Location

Robson Square Campus, The University of British Columbia

Registation / More Information:

http://cloudcom.org/

Speaker Info
Description

CloudCom is the premier conference on Cloud Computing worldwide, attracting researchers, developers, users, students and practitioners from the fields of big data, systems architecture, services research, virtualization, security and privacy, high performance computing, always with an emphasis on how to build cloud computing platforms with real impact. The conference is co-sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), is steered by the Cloud Computing Association, and draws on the excellence of its world-class Program Committee and its participants.

VanBUG logo
Date:
Location

Gordon and Leslie Diamond Family Theatre
BC Cancer Research Centre
675 West 10th Avenue

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Fiona Brinkman
Professor, Dept. of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Simon Fraser University
Description

Webcast Link: http://vidyoreplay.computecanada.ca/replay/webcastShow.html?key=TAKdbjoDvIqKdLn 
(This technology is brought to you by Compute Canada and WestGrid with support from PHSA Telehelath)

Abstract: 
As sequencing technology now allows us to rapidly sequence many microbial genomes daily, microbial bioinformatics is facing multiple challenges in large scale data integration, data analysis and visualization – challenges that other organismal/human genomics/bioinformatics areas will reach shortly. There is also rapidly growing understanding of the diverse role of microbes in humans and wider ecosystems – more than previously appreciated even a year ago – plus growing appreciation of microbial applications in medicine, agri-foods, environmental, and industrial fields. I will review my microbial bioinformatics research in the context of these diverse microbial applications, and in the context of current challenges more generally in bioinformatics. I will aim to show why all bioinformaticists should care about following microbial bioinformatics research. Also why now is a critical time for bioinformaticists to come together to promote open data, data standards, and open software development, to ensure we can effectively, and collectively, meet current challenges and capitalize on the wealth of data to come.

Website: Fiona Brinkman
Twitter: @fionabrinkman

Bio:
Fiona Brinkman is a Professor in Bioinformatics and Genomics the Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry at Simon Fraser University. Her expertise in microbial bioinformatics has led her to develop award-winning computational tools for analysis of human and microbe responses to infection and allergy. She currently coordinates a genome database project involving hundreds of researchers from 13 countries, and she is leading/co-leading multiple research projects improving microbial bioinformatics analyses with other researchers, such as from the BC Centre for Disease Control, National Microbiology Laboratory (PHAC), and other institutions in the U.S., Portugal, and UK. She is on several committees and Boards, including the Board of Directors for Genome Canada, the Scientific Advisory Board of the EBI’s European Nucleotide Archive, and the CIHR/GC Bioinformatics and Computational Biology National Strategy Committee. She cares strongly about bioinformatics training and is SFU co-Director of the UBC/SFU Bioinformatics Graduate Program. She has been a Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Senior Scholar who has received a number of awards, including the Canadian Society of Microbiologists Fisher Award, Canada’s Top 100 Women from the Women’s Executive Network, a TR100 award from MIT for being one of the “top 100 of the world’s young innovators in science and technology”, and most recently was recognized by Thomson Reuters as a Highly Cited Researcher – in the “top 1% of highly cited researchers in her field”.

Please note:
Trainees are invited to meet with the VanBUG speaker for open discussion of both science and career paths. This takes place 4:30-5:30pm in either the Boardroom or Lunchroom on the ground floor of the BCCRC  

——————————

Introductory Speaker:
Saeed Saberi (Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Dr. Martin Hirst’s Lab, Michael Smith Laboratories, UBC)
Title: “Chromatin landscape alteration in the rhabdoid tumour”

——————————

About VanBUG:
VanBUG (Vancouver Bioinformatics Users Group) is an association of researchers, other professionals and students in the BC Lower Mainland who have an interest in the field of bioinformatics. VanBUG meets on the second Thursday of every month from September through April. Research presentations by bioinformatics leaders, students and industry representatives are followed by networking over pizza and refreshments Meetings are held in the Gordon and Leslie Diamond Family Theatre, BC Cancer Research Centre, 675 West 10th Avenue at 6:00 pm and are free and open to all.

Date:
Location

Gordon and Leslie Diamond Family Theatre
BC Cancer Research Centre
675 West 10th Avenue

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Tamara Munzner
Professor, Dept. of Computer Science
University of British Columbia
Description

Webcast Link: http://vidyoreplay.computecanada.ca/replay/webcastShow.html?key=TAKdbjoDvIqKdLn 
(This technology is brought to you by Compute Canada and WestGrid with support from PHSA Telehelath)

Abstract: 
Computer-based visualization systems provide visual representations of datasets designed to help people carry out tasks more effectively. They are suitable when there is a need to augment human capabilities rather than replace people with computational decision-making methods. Visualization usage can be analyzed in terms of why the user needs it, what data is shown, and how the idiom is designed. I will discuss this framework for analyzing the design of visualization systems and analyze a range of biology visualization applications through this lens.

Bio:
Tamara Munzner is a professor at the University of British Columbia Department of Computer Science, and holds a PhD from Stanford. She has been active in visualization research since 1991 and has published over sixty-five papers and chapters. Her book Visualization Analysis and Design appeared in 2014. She co-chaired InfoVis in 2003 and 2004, co-chaired EuroVis in 2009 and 2010, and is chair of the VIS Executive Committee. She has worked on visualization projects in a broad range of application domains, including genomics, evolutionary biology, geometric topology, computational linguistics, large-scale system administration, web log analysis, and journalism.

Please note: 
Trainees are invited to meet with the VanBUG speaker for open discussion of both science and career paths. This takes place 4:30-5:30pm in either the Boardroom or Lunchroom on the ground floor of the BCCRC. Also, each seminar is followed by complementary pizza, refreshments, and great networking. 

——————————

Introductory Speaker: 
Bhav Dhillon (PhD Candidate, Dr. Fiona Brinkman’s Lab, SFU)
Title: “Exploring the evolution of antimicrobial resistance using IslandViewer 3”
Bio: Bachelor’s degree from University of British Columbia with specialization in Microbiology and Computer Science. Joined the Bioinformatics training program in 2009, as a PhD student in Fiona Brinkman’s lab at Simon Fraser University where I’m developing computational tools to study the fascinating world of microbes and genomic islands.

——————————

About VanBUG:
VanBUG (Vancouver Bioinformatics Users Group) is an association of researchers, other professionals and students in the BC Lower Mainland who have an interest in the field of bioinformatics. VanBUG meets on the second Thursday of every month from September through April. Research presentations by bioinformatics leaders, students and industry representatives are followed by networking over pizza and refreshments Meetings are held in the Gordon and Leslie Diamond Family Theatre, BC Cancer Research Centre, 675 West 10th Avenue at 6:00 pm and are free and open to all.

Date:
Location

Gordon and Leslie Diamond Family Theatre
BC Cancer Research Centre
675 West 10th Avenue

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Dr. Leonid Chindelevitch
Department of Computer Science
Simon Fraser University
Description

Webcast Link: http://vidyoreplay.computecanada.ca/replay/webcastShow.html?key=TAKdbjoDvIqKdLn 
(This technology is brought to you by Compute Canada and WestGrid with support from PHSA Telehelath)

Abstract: 
Infectious diseases continue to affect the lives of millions of people around the world, but we still understand relatively little about how exactly they spread through populations. I will discuss an epidemiological model of the joint epidemic of tuberculosis and HIV in South Africa as an example of the kind of tools policymakers had at their disposal until recently. I will then go on to show how genotypic information can be harnessed to interrogate an epidemic, using the example of complex tuberculosis infections. I will conclude with a mechanistic model that describes the way bacterial pathogens may evolve resistance to drugs, and finally sketch a unified multiscale model that could one day provide new insights into the nature of infectious disease epidemics.

Please note: 
Trainees are invited to meet with the VanBUG speaker for open discussion of both science and career paths. This takes place 4:30-5:30pm in either the Boardroom or Lunchroom on the ground floor of the BCCRC. Also, each seminar is followed by complementary pizza, refreshments, and great networking. 

——————————

Introductory Speaker: 
Rodrigo Goya (PhD Cadidate, Dr. Marco Marra’s Lab, BCCRC)
Title: Alternative Expression in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Subgroups

——————————

About VanBUG:
VanBUG (Vancouver Bioinformatics Users Group) is an association of researchers, other professionals and students in the BC Lower Mainland who have an interest in the field of bioinformatics. VanBUG meets on the second Thursday of every month from September through April. Research presentations by bioinformatics leaders, students and industry representatives are followed by networking over pizza and refreshments Meetings are held in the Gordon and Leslie Diamond Family Theatre, BC Cancer Research Centre, 675 West 10th Avenue at 6:00 pm and are free and open to all.

VanBUG logo
Date:
Location

Gordon and Leslie Diamond Family Theatre
BC Cancer Research Centre
675 West 10th Avenue

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Adam Phillippy
Sr. Principal Investigator
National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center
Description

Webcast Link: http://vidyoreplay.computecanada.ca/replay/webcastShow.html?key=TAKdbjoDvIqKdLn 
(This technology is brought to you by Compute Canada and WestGrid with support from PHSA Telehelath)

Abstract: 
Coming soon...

Please note: 
Trainees are invited to meet with the VanBUG speaker for open discussion of both science and career paths. This takes place 4:30-5:30pm in either the Boardroom or Lunchroom on the ground floor of the BCCRC. Also, each seminar is followed by complementary pizza, refreshments, and great networking. 

——————————

Introductory Speaker: 
Julie Chen (PhD Student, Dr. Wasserman’s Lab, CMMT/CFRI)
Title: TBC

——————————

About VanBUG:
VanBUG (Vancouver Bioinformatics Users Group) is an association of researchers, other professionals and students in the BC Lower Mainland who have an interest in the field of bioinformatics. VanBUG meets on the second Thursday of every month from September through April. Research presentations by bioinformatics leaders, students and industry representatives are followed by networking over pizza and refreshments Meetings are held in the Gordon and Leslie Diamond Family Theatre, BC Cancer Research Centre, 675 West 10th Avenue at 6:00 pm and are free and open to all.

Date:
Location

Gordon and Leslie Diamond Family Theatre
BC Cancer Research Centre
675 West 10th Avenue

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Sara Mostafavi
Assistant Professor, Dept. of Statistics
University of British Columbia
Description

Webcast Link: http://vidyoreplay.computecanada.ca/replay/webcastShow.html?key=TAKdbjoDvIqKdLn 
(This technology is brought to you by Compute Canada and WestGrid with support from PHSA Telehelath)

Talk Abstract:
Technological advances in the last decade now enable us to measure parts of biological systems at various resolutions, for example, at the genome, epigenome, and the transcriptome levels. These data provide an opportunity to build mechanistic models of gene regulatory networks, and further to infer dysregulation of these networks that underlie complex diseases and traits. In this talk, I’ll present computational and statistical approaches for:

a) combining multiple types of genomics data to better understand dysregulatory effects in a complex psychiatry disorder, namely major depression;

b) inferring gene regulatory networks across multiple tissues and cell types, and identifying the impact of inter-individual genetic variation on these networks.

Speaker Bio: 

Sara Mostafavi is an Assistant Professor at the Departments of Statistics and Medical Genetics at UBC. Sara did her PhD in Computer Science at the University of Toronto, where she focused her research in the area of machine learning and computational biology. She then did a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford’s Department of Computer Science, followed by a research fellowship at Harvard Medical School. Sara’s research focuses on developing and using machine learning and statistical methods for combining high dimensional genomics data, in order to reconstruct gene regulatory networks, and to identify genes and pathways underlying a variety of complex neuropsychiatric disorders.

Please note: 
Trainees are invited to meet with the VanBUG speaker for open discussion of both science and career paths. This takes place 4:30-5:30pm in either the Boardroom or Lunchroom on the ground floor of the BCCRC. Also, each seminar is followed by complementary pizza, refreshments, and great networking. 

——————————

Introductory Speaker: 

  • Elizabeth Chun, PhD student (Dr. Marco Marra lab)

——————————

About VanBUG:
VanBUG (Vancouver Bioinformatics Users Group) is an association of researchers, other professionals and students in the BC Lower Mainland who have an interest in the field of bioinformatics. VanBUG meets on the second Thursday of every month from September through April. Research presentations by bioinformatics leaders, students and industry representatives are followed by networking over pizza and refreshments Meetings are held in the Gordon and Leslie Diamond Family Theatre, BC Cancer Research Centre, 675 West 10th Avenue at 6:00 pm and are free and open to all.

Date:
Location

Gordon and Leslie Diamond Family Theatre
BC Cancer Research Centre
675 West 10th Avenue

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Elhanan Borenstein
Associate Professor, Dept of Genome Sciences
University of Washington
Description

Webcast Link: http://vidyoreplay.computecanada.ca/replay/webcastShow.html?key=TAKdbjoDvIqKdLn 
(This technology is brought to you by Compute Canada and WestGrid with support from PHSA Telehelath)

Abstract: 
Coming soon...

Please note: 
Trainees are invited to meet with the VanBUG speaker for open discussion of both science and career paths. This takes place 4:30-5:30pm in either the Boardroom or Lunchroom on the ground floor of the BCCRC. Also, each seminar is followed by complementary pizza, refreshments, and great networking. 

——————————

Introductory Speaker: 
Thea Van Rossum (PhD Student, Dr. Fiona Brinkman’s Lab, SFU)
Title: TBC

——————————

About VanBUG:
VanBUG (Vancouver Bioinformatics Users Group) is an association of researchers, other professionals and students in the BC Lower Mainland who have an interest in the field of bioinformatics. VanBUG meets on the second Thursday of every month from September through April. Research presentations by bioinformatics leaders, students and industry representatives are followed by networking over pizza and refreshments Meetings are held in the Gordon and Leslie Diamond Family Theatre, BC Cancer Research Centre, 675 West 10th Avenue at 6:00 pm and are free and open to all.

Research Data Management Week 2015
Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered live at Simon Fraser University and will be videoconferenced and webstreamed to allow for remote viewing. Please RSVP a minimum 24 hours prior to the seminar to indicate if you intend to:

  • Attend in person at SFU -- Room 10901, Applied Sciences Building
  • Attend a regional videoconference location; or
  • Watch the webstream online (URL will be emailed you prior to the seminar)
Speaker Info
Dr. Martin Ester
Computing Science
Simon Fraser University
Description

With the dramatic growth of internet-based services, increasingly large numbers of items, such as web pages, videos, products etc. become available to users. To cope with the information overload, users demand a personalized selection of items that are relevant to their needs, but are typically not willing to spend much effort on specifying their personal needs. This has motivated the development of recommender systems, which automatically learn the user needs from available user feedback data. Feedback data can be explicit, e.g. ratings of movies, or implicit, e.g. clickstream data which records parts of the screen a user clicks on. The idea of Collaborative Filtering (CF) is to exploit big feedback data from many users to make recommendations to each individual user, assuming that users that have provided similar feedback on some items are likely to have similar feedback on further items. In this talk, we will briefly introduce matrix factorization as a state-of-the-art method to implement CF. We will then present two of our own research projects that explore the potential of social media for improving the quality of recommendations. First, we will show how to leverage a social network among users and the well-known effects of social influence and selection. Second, we will present an approach that also considers textual feedback data, i.e. product reviews, to create more fine-grained recommendations taking into account that user feedback may be based on different aspects of an item. While recommender systems have been successful in many personalization tasks, they come with their own risks. We will conclude the talk with a discussion of privacy issues, in particular in the context of social networks, and the so-called “filter bubble”, the phenomenon that due to personalization users do not get exposed to information that could challenge their worldview.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered live at York University and will be videoconferenced and webstreamed to allow for remote viewing. Please RSVP a minimum 24 hours prior to the seminar to indicate if you intend to:

  • Attend a regional videoconference location; or
  • Watch the webstream online (URL will be emailed you prior to the seminar)
Speaker Info
Dr. James Elder
Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering; Department of Psychology
York University
Description

The human retina contains over 60M photoreceptors. If we ballpark temporal sampling at 60Hz this implies a data rate of about 3.6GBps. At 25 years of age you have already processed on the order of 700 petabytes ( bits) of data. This is big!

How do human and machine visual systems extract value from this onslaught of information? One common factor is learning: Human perceptual development is strongly data-driven and requires extensive experience; in fact it is now known that some visual function does not fully develop until the late teens. In the last few decades we have witnessed a revolution in machine vision research through a congruent integration of machine learning methods that take advantage of big data.

Despite this commonality, there are profound differences between the human visual system and machine vision systems. Biological systems are inherently general-purpose in nature, called on to solve a diversity of problems (scene layout, object recognition, navigation…), often concurrently. This encourages the development of efficient, generative, general-purpose models that serve multiple functions. Machine vision algorithms, on the other hand, tend to target narrowly defined problems associated with specialized datasets, leading to specific models that can limit representations to capture only the most relevant features.

Despite this divergence, there are also opportunities for convergence, particularly as we try to make machine vision systems more general in nature. I will discuss research problems in perceptual organization, shape perception, linear perspective and spatial attention which can contribute to the development of general-purpose visual systems, and where research in biological and computer vision has already been synergistic.

About the Speaker:
James Elder is a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science and the Department of Psychology at York University, and a member of York’s Centre for Vision Research. His research seeks to improve machine vision systems through a better understanding of visual processing in biological systems. Current research is focused on natural scene statistics, perceptual organization, contour processing, shape perception, single-view 3D reconstruction, attentive vision systems and machine vision systems for dynamic 3D urban awareness.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

* NOTE: This seminar has been cancelled due to a scheduling conflict with the speaker. The Coast to Coast Seminar Series is now on a winter break. Dates for the 2016 Spring Season (Jan-March) will be advertised once confirmed. If you have any questions or would like more informatio on the Coast to Coast series, please contact Veselin Jungic. *

Speaker Info
Raymond Ng
Professor, Computer Science
University of British Columbia
Description

* NOTE: This seminar has been cancelled due to a scheduling conflict with the speaker. The Coast to Coast Seminar Series is now on a winter break. Dates for the 2016 Spring Season (Jan-March) will be advertised once confirmed. If you have any questions or would like more informatio on the Coast to Coast series, please contact Veselin Jungic. *

Personalized medicine has been hailed as one of the main frontiers for medical research in this century. In the first half of the talk, we will give an overview on our projects that use gene expression, proteomics, DNA and clinical features for biomarker discovery. In the second half of the talk, we will describe some of the challenges involved in biomarker discovery. One of the challenges is the lack of quality assessment tools for data generated by ever-evolving genomics platforms. We will conclude the talk by giving an overview of some of the techniques we have developed on data cleansing and pre-processing.

About the Speaker
Dr. Raymond Ng is a professor in Computer Science at the University of British Columbia. His main research area for the past two decades is on data mining, with a specific focus on health informatics and text mining. He has published over 180 peer-reviewed publications on data clustering, outlier detection, OLAP processing, health informatics and text mining. He is the recipient of two best paper awards - from 2001 ACM SIGKDD conference, which is the premier data mining conference worldwide, and the 2005 ACM SIGMOD conference, which is one of the top database conferences worldwide. He was one of the program co-chairs of the 2009 International conference on Data Engineering, and one of the program co-chairs of the 2002 ACM SIGKDD conference. He was also one of the general co-chairs of the 2008 ACM SIGMOD conference.

For the past decade, Dr. Ng has co-led several large scale genomic projects, funded by Genome Canada, Genome BC and industrial collaborators. The total amount of funding of those projects well exceeded $40 million Canadian dollars. He now holds the Chief Informatics Officer position of the PROOF Centre of Excellence, which focuses on biomarker development for end-stage organ failures.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered at Ryerson University and will be videoconferenced and webstreamed to allow for remote viewing. Please RSVP a minimum 24 hours prior to the seminar to indicate if you intend to:

  • Attend a regional videoconference location; or
  • Watch the webstream online (URL will be emailed you prior to the seminar)
Speaker Info
Dr Ayse Basar Bener
Professor and Director, Data Science Lab Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Ryerson University
Description

Abstract:
The fundamental question that recommender system aims to answer is “What does the end-user really want?”. If the end-user already knows what s/he specifically wants, s/he would benefit from using a search engine. If the end-user does not know the answer to this question, s/he would benefit from using a recommender system. Taking into account context in recommender system is emerging as a new frontier that significantly improves the level of engagement between the end-users and the recommender system. The majority of traditional recommender systems do not focus on contextual information. Instead, traditional recommender systems tend to focus on entities, users and items. This approach works as long as the circumstances do not impact the system. This limits the use and the performance of traditional recommender system. When circumstances do affect the outcome, it becomes necessary – if not critical – to go beyond a traditional recommender system and to incorporate contextual information. In this talk I will go over different approaches to build context-aware recommender systems.

About the Speaker:
Dr. Ayse Basar Bener is a professor and the director of Data Science Laboratory (DSL) in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, and director of Big Data in the Office of Provost and Vice President Academic at Ryerson University. She is a faculty research fellow of IBM Toronto Labs Centre for Advance Studies, and affiliate research scientist in St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto. Her current research focus is big data applications to tackle the problem of decision-making under uncertainty by using machine learning methods and graph theory to analyze complex structures in big data to build recommender systems and predictive models in health care, software engineering, smart energy grid, and green software. She is a member of AAAI, INFORMS, AIS, and a senior member of IEEE.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered at Dalhousie University and will be videoconferenced and webstreamed to allow for remote viewing. Please RSVP a minimum 24 hours prior to the seminar to indicate if you intend to:

  • Attend a regional videoconference location; or
  • Watch the webstream online (URL will be emailed you prior to the seminar)
Speaker Info
Dr. Stan Matwin
Professor and Canada Research Chair, Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
Description

In this presentation we will focus on the ongoing work in exploration and analysis of data from ocean vessel movements, using the Automatic Identification System (AIS) data. We will discuss some of the challenges and benefits related to the large-scale exploration and analysis of AIS data. We will look at detection of anomalous trajectories of ships in mid-ocean and in port vicinity, and at the ecologically-oriented detection and analysis of data related to fishing activities. We will discuss our early results in these select applications, including data representation and data modeling techniques, particularly the clustering techniques, classification, and attribute engineering used in our work. We will round up with discussion of potential future work with AIS data.

About The Speaker:
Stan Matwin is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in the Faculty of Computer Science at Dalhousie University, where he directs the Institute for Big Data Analytics. He is also a Professor at the Institute of Computer Science, Polish Academy of Sciences. His research interests are in text analytics, data mining, as well as in data privacy. Author and co-author of more than 250 research papers and articles, Stan is a former President of the Canadian Artificial Intelligence Society, a member of the Scientific Council of the Polish Artificial Intelligence Society, and a member of Association Francaise pour l’Intelligence Artificielle.

Date:
Location

ECHA L1-250
Edmonton Clinic Health Academy
University of Alberta

Registation / More Information:

To register online, click here.

For more information, please contact info@westgrid.ca.

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

WestGrid is pleased to present a free hands-on workshop on scientific visualization using ParaView. All disciplines and experience levels are welcome. You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing data sets is invited to attend.

ParaView is an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization application. ParaView users can quickly build visualizations to analyze their data using qualitative and quantitative techniques. This workshop will explore the basics of scientific visualization with 2- and 3-dimensional data sets through hands-on exercises.

Attendees will need to bring a laptop and should have ParaView installed on their laptop before the workshop. To download ParaView, click here.

Workshop Outline:

  • Scientific visualization overview
  • ParaView interface
  • 2D and 3D visualization
  • Scientific datasets and formats
  • Putting it all together: creating a visualization pipeline, using filters
  • Python scripting in ParaView
  • Animation
  • Remote and batch-mode visualization using WestGrid resources
Visualization Example - SFU Workshop May 2015
Date:
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 17:00 CST to Wednesday, December 2, 2015 - 0:30 CST
Location

University of Manitoba
Room 326, Education Building

Registation / More Information:

To register online, click here.

For more information, contact Alex Razoumov, WestGrid Visualization Coordinator.

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

WestGrid is pleased to present a free hands-on workshop on scientific visualization using ParaView. All disciplines and experience levels are welcome. You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing data sets is invited to attend.

ParaView is an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization application. ParaView users can quickly build visualizations to analyze their data using qualitative and quantitative techniques. This workshop will explore the basics of scientific visualization with 2- and 3-dimensional data sets through hands-on exercises.

Attendees will need to bring a laptop and should have ParaView installed on their laptop before the workshop. To download ParaView, click here.

Workshop Outline:

  • Scientific visualization overview
  • ParaView interface
  • 2D and 3D visualization
  • Scientific datasets and formats
  • Putting it all together: creating a visualization pipeline, using filters
  • Python scripting in ParaView
  • Animation
  • Remote and batch-mode visualization using WestGrid resources
Date:
Wednesday, November 25, 2015 - 8:00 MST to Friday, November 27, 2015 - 8:00 MST
Location
Registation / More Information:

Registration is now closed.

Please email info@westgrid.ca for questions or requests more information.

Speaker Info
Kamil Marcinkowski
WestGrid Site Lead / System Administrator
University of Alberta
Description

This online workshop focuses on getting the most out of a cluster using a scheduler. Split into three parts, each two-hour session will provide hands-on training and offer users a chance to experiment with job submission techniques. Held over three days, each of the three sessions will be delivered online as a two-hour webinar.

Wednesday, November 25 - Friday, November 27
1:30 - 3:30 pm MST each day
Participants will connect to the webinar using Vidyo
(connection instructions will be sent to all registrants)

Part 1 will discuss how a scheduler works and how to use the knowledge to your advantage. Participants will practice how to submit basic jobs, with a focus on productivity. Other topics covered include: 

  • optimizing walltime 
  • MPI and OpenMP jobs 
  • job arrays 
  • Interactive Jobs

Part 2 will discuss how to submit and run more advanced jobs. Participants will practice examining jobs, and understand their state. Knowledge and practice of the topics covered in Part 1 is a prerequisite for attending this workshop. Other topics covered include:

  • Jobs and memory 
  • partitions 
  • gpus 
  • software licenses, job dependencies, accounting groups and advanced requests

Part 3 will discuss how a cluster chooses which jobs are to be run first by examining the topics of fairness, priority, and reservations. Participants will examine the state of the cluster and their jobs in order to troubleshoot problems. Knowledge and practice of the topics covered in Parts 1 and 2 is a prerequisite for attending this workshop.

Course Materials:

Who Should Attend:
This session is intended for current WestGrid account holders who have had some experience submitting jobs but would like to learn how to increase their job productivity and efficiency. Familiarity with logging in to WestGrid systems, using UNIX and basic job script commands is recommended.

Participants should:

  • Have a WestGrid account and have experience logging into the Jasper cluster
  • Be somewhat proficient in U/Linux, i.e.:
    • Know what a man page is.
    • Can edit, copy, and delete files.
    • Can use top and ps to see resources used of a process.
    • Know what unix environment variables are, how to set and display them.
Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This session is being delivered live at the University of Alberta as well as videoconferenced and webcast to allow for remote viewing. Please RSVP a minimum 24 hours prior to the seminar to indicate if you intend to:

  • Attend in person at the University of Alberta
  • Attend at a regional videoconference location, or
  • Watch the webstream online (URL will be emailed you prior to the seminar)
Speaker Info
John Simpson
Digital Humanities Specialist
Compute Canada
Description

Does your research have needs for large-scale computing, data management, or storage? Compute Canada, in partnership with WestGrid and other regional organizations, provides state-of-the-art advanced research computing (ARC) systems and software for Canadian researchers and their collaborators in all academic and industrial sectors. Compute Canada receives funding through the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) and its services and resources are available for free to any academic researcher in Canada.

Join us for a 30-minute introduction to WestGrid and Compute Canada. This talk will provide an overview of some of the expertise, resources and services available to support your research, and will explain how to get an account and get started. University faculty, grad students, and staff from all disciplines are invited to attend.

Compute Canada current service offerings include:

  • Computation – Expandable power ranging from the equivalent of a second desktop to supercomputers with thousands of cores, terabytes of RAM, and a variety of system architectures.
  • Data Storage – Robust storage solutions for backup and mid- to long-term storage.
  • General Analyst/Consultant Support – Consultations regarding project architecture and resource needs with technical experts with skills ranging from specialty software selection to program optimization.
  • Globus – Fast, secure, sharing and fire-and-forget file transfers.
  • ownCloud – 50Gb of shareable, Dropbox-like space available across multiple devices.
  • Portals – Hosting for specialized data and tools for entire research communities.
  • Specialized Software – More than 250 software programs and packages already integrated with Compute Canada systems.
  • Visualization Support – Dedicated 3D visualization expert available.
  • Cloud – Virtual-machine development space that includes an outward-facing IP address.
The C2C seminar will explore &quot;Big Data&quot; problems faced by researchers examining the immune response to infectious and autoimmune diseases
Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

This talk is being delivered live in Toronto and will be videoconferenced and webstreamed to allow for remote viewing. Please RSVP a minimum 24 hours prior to the seminar to indicate if you intend to:

  • Attend a regional videoconference location; or
  • Watch the webstream online (URL will be emailed you prior to the seminar)
Speaker Info
Dr. Muhammad Mamdani
Director, Applied Health Research Centre
St. Micheal's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario
Description

Data sciences in healthcare is playing an increasingly important role in not only helping healthcare systems manage ever-increasing healthcare budgets but also helping clinicians best manage their patients. Healthcare often has an abundance of data but is evolving in its approach to the us of this data in optimizing outcomes. The focus of this talk will be on understanding the role of data sciences in healthcare from clinical and systems points of view. The attendee will be exposed to traditional perspective many clinicians and healthcare leaders assume when dealing with data to inform their decisions. Opportunities for using 'big data' and data sciences in this area will be discussed.

About the Speaker:
Dr. Mamdani is the Director of the Applied Health Research Centre (AHRC), the Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto. He is also Professor in the Institute for Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation of the Dhalla Lana Faculty of Public Health and the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, where he supervises graduate students and a Senior Adjunct Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES). Prior to joining the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and St. Michael’s Hospital, Dr. Mamdani was a Director of Outcomes Research at Pfizer Global Pharmaceuticals in New York. In 2010 he was named among Canada’s ‘Top 40 Under 40’. In 2013 he was named as a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS). Dr. Mamdani’s research interests include pharmacoepidemiology, pharmacoeconomics, and drug policy. He has published over 300 research studies in peer-reviewed medical journals.

Dr. Mamdani obtained a Doctor of Pharmacy degree (PharmD) from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) in 1995 and subsequently completed a fellowship in pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research at the Detroit Medical Center in 1997. During his fellowship, Dr. Mamdani obtained a Master of Arts degree in Economics from Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. He then completed a Master of Public Health degree from Harvard University in 1998 with a concentration in quantitative methods, focusing on biostatistics and epidemiological principles.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Attendance will be capped at 30 spots, on a first-come first-served basis. Please register by Monday, October 26. Registration is now closed.

  • Please email info@westgrid.ca for any questions or requests for more information.
Speaker Info
Masao Fujinaga
Programmer Analyst, Information Services & Technology
University of Alberta
Description

This two-hour online tutorial will provide step-by-step demonstrations for getting started with using WestGrid computing facilities. The session will include demonstrations of how to log in, submit jobs, move data, and troubleshoot problems. You must have a WestGrid account to participate in this session. To register for an account, visit this page.

This will be an introductory-level session, complete with hands-on exercises, that covers the basics of getting started using WestGrid systems. It will provide tips for how to use the machines more efficiently and effectively. Any faculty members and graduate students in any discipline who have a WestGrid account are invited to attend.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Attendance will be capped at 30 spots, on a first-come first-served basis. Please register by Monday, October 28. Registration is now closed.

  • Please email info@westgrid.ca for any questions or requests for more information.
Speaker Info
John Simpson
Digital Humanities Specialist
Compute Canada
Description

This two-hour online tutorial is a followup to Using WestGrid - Part 1, which focused on getting started with WestGrid and Compute Canada computing resources. Part 2 will focus on some of Compute Canada's other services, such as:

  • ownCloud storage – 50Gb of shareable, Dropbox-like space available across multiple devices.
  • Globus – Fast, secure, sharing and fire-and-forget file transfers.
  • Cloud computing – Virtual-machine development space that includes an outward-facing IP address.

This will be an introductory level course with hands-on exercises and will include demonstrations of how to log in, set up your account, and perform basic functions to get started. Note: You must have a WestGrid account in order to participate. You do not have to attend Using WestGrid - Part 1 as a prerequisite, but it is strongly recommended.

Date:
Monday, October 26, 2015 - 7:00 CDT to Wednesday, October 28, 2015 - 7:00 CDT
Location

University of Manitoba
E2-528 EITC

Registation / More Information:

CLICK HERE for more information and to RSVP (space is limited).

Speaker Info
Hossein Pourreza
HPC Specialist
University of Manitoba
Description

Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

For more information on what we teach and why, please see our paper "Best Practices for Scientific Computing".

Who: The course is aimed at graduate students and other researchers. You don't need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

When: Monday October 26 & Wednesday October 28, 2015, 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

Where: Winnipeg. Get directions with OpenStreetMap or Google Maps.

Requirements: Participants must bring a laptop with a few specific software packages installed (listed HERE). They are also required to abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.

Contact: Please email hossein.pourreza@umanitoba.ca for more information.

Date:
Location

203 Rutherford Library South. Get directions with OpenStreetMap or Google Maps.

Registation / More Information:

Contact: Please mail john.simpson@computecanada.ca for more information.

Speaker Info
John Simpson
University of Alberta
Description

Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

For more information on what we teach and why, please see our paper "Best Practices for Scientific Computing".

Who: The course is aimed at graduate students and other researchers. You don't need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Requirements: Participants must bring a laptop with a few specific software packages installed (listed below). They are also required to abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.

Etherpad: https://etherpad.mozilla.org/2015-10-19-ualberta
We will use this Etherpad for chatting, taking notes, and sharing URLs and bits of code.

 

Date:
Location

Sheraton Wall Centre
Port McNeill Room

Registation / More Information:

CFI asks that you RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend. For those unable to attend any of the sessions, the CFI will post the presentation online by October 30, 2015.

Speaker Info
Description

Over the next two months, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) staff will be meeting with stakeholders across the country on potential adjustments to the CFI’s core funding mechanisms:

CFI asks that you RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend.

The purpose of the consultation is to:

  • identify opportunities for better alignment with institutional and community needs;
  • make adjustments to the design of CFI funds to address evolving priorities; and,
  • encourage the development of research infrastructure proposals of the highest quality, in order to better enhance the capacity of institutions and their researchers to conduct world-class research and technology development.

Consultation on the CFI’s fund architecture: A discussion paper

CFI invites you to also submit your comments in writing by November 30, 2015 to consultation@innovation.ca.  

Date:
Location

University of Victoria
Haro Room, Cadboro Commons Building

Registation / More Information:

CFI asks that you RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend. For those unable to attend any of the sessions, the CFI will post the presentation online by October 30, 2015.

Speaker Info
Description

Over the next two months, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) staff will be meeting with stakeholders across the country on potential adjustments to the CFI’s core funding mechanisms:

CFI requests that you please RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend.

The purpose of the consultation is to:

  • identify opportunities for better alignment with institutional and community needs;
  • make adjustments to the design of CFI funds to address evolving priorities; and,
  • encourage the development of research infrastructure proposals of the highest quality, in order to better enhance the capacity of institutions and their researchers to conduct world-class research and technology development.

Consultation on the CFI’s fund architecture: A discussion paper

CFI invites you to also submit your comments in writing by November 30, 2015 to consultation@innovation.ca

Date:
Location

Univeristy of Alberta
Room TBC

Registation / More Information:

CFI asks that you RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend. For those unable to attend any of the sessions, the CFI will post the presentation online by October 30, 2015.

Speaker Info
Description

Over the next two months, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) staff will be meeting with stakeholders across the country on potential adjustments to the CFI’s core funding mechanisms:

CFI asks that you RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend.

The purpose of the consultation is to:

  • identify opportunities for better alignment with institutional and community needs;
  • make adjustments to the design of CFI funds to address evolving priorities; and,
  • encourage the development of research infrastructure proposals of the highest quality, in order to better enhance the capacity of institutions and their researchers to conduct world-class research and technology development.

Consultation on the CFI’s fund architecture: A discussion paper

CFI invites you to also submit your comments in writing by November 30, 2015 to consultation@innovation.ca.  

Date:
Location

University of Calgary
Gallery Hall, Taylor Family Digital Library (TFDL)

Registation / More Information:

CFI asks that you RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend. For those unable to attend any of the sessions, the CFI will post the presentation online by October 30, 2015.

Speaker Info
Description

Over the next two months, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) staff will be meeting with stakeholders across the country on potential adjustments to the CFI’s core funding mechanisms:

CFI asks that you RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend.

The purpose of the consultation is to:

  • identify opportunities for better alignment with institutional and community needs;
  • make adjustments to the design of CFI funds to address evolving priorities; and,
  • encourage the development of research infrastructure proposals of the highest quality, in order to better enhance the capacity of institutions and their researchers to conduct world-class research and technology development.

Consultation on the CFI’s fund architecture: A discussion paper

CFI invites you to also submit your comments in writing by November 30, 2015 to consultation@innovation.ca.  

Date:
Location

University of Manitoba
Room TBC

Registation / More Information:

CFI asks that you RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend. For those unable to attend any of the sessions, the CFI will post the presentation online by October 30, 2015.

Speaker Info
Description

Over the next two months, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) staff will be meeting with stakeholders across the country on potential adjustments to the CFI’s core funding mechanisms:

CFI asks that you RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend.

The purpose of the consultation is to:

  • identify opportunities for better alignment with institutional and community needs;
  • make adjustments to the design of CFI funds to address evolving priorities; and,
  • encourage the development of research infrastructure proposals of the highest quality, in order to better enhance the capacity of institutions and their researchers to conduct world-class research and technology development.

Consultation on the CFI’s fund architecture: A discussion paper

CFI invites you to also submit your comments in writing by November 30, 2015 to consultation@innovation.ca.  

Date:
Location

University of Saskatchewan
Lecture space - Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization (VIDO)
120 Veterinary Road
Note: VIDO is a secure building. Please allot at least 15 minutes to sign in and find a seat.

Registation / More Information:

CFI asks that you RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend. For those unable to attend any of the sessions, the CFI will post the presentation online by October 30, 2015.

Speaker Info
Description

Over the next two months, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) staff will be meeting with stakeholders across the country on potential adjustments to the CFI’s core funding mechanisms:

CFI asks that you RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend.

The purpose of the consultation is to:

  • identify opportunities for better alignment with institutional and community needs;
  • make adjustments to the design of CFI funds to address evolving priorities; and,
  • encourage the development of research infrastructure proposals of the highest quality, in order to better enhance the capacity of institutions and their researchers to conduct world-class research and technology development.

Consultation on the CFI’s fund architecture: A discussion paper

CFI invites you to also submit your comments in writing by November 30, 2015 to consultation@innovation.ca.  

Date:
Location

University of Regina
Room 527, Administration Humanities Building

Registation / More Information:

CFI asks that you RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend. For those unable to attend any of the sessions, the CFI will post the presentation online by October 30, 2015.

Speaker Info
Description

Over the next two months, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) staff will be meeting with stakeholders across the country on potential adjustments to the CFI’s core funding mechanisms:

CFI asks that you RSVP with the name of your institution, the number of participants from your institution and the city/location of the session you will attend to rsvp@innovation.ca no later than one week prior to the session. CFI encourages all interested research administrators, funding partners, researchers, and other stakeholders to attend.

The purpose of the consultation is to:

  • identify opportunities for better alignment with institutional and community needs;
  • make adjustments to the design of CFI funds to address evolving priorities; and,
  • encourage the development of research infrastructure proposals of the highest quality, in order to better enhance the capacity of institutions and their researchers to conduct world-class research and technology development.

Consultation on the CFI’s fund architecture: A discussion paper

CFI invites you to also submit your comments in writing by November 30, 2015 to consultation@innovation.ca.  

Date:
Monday, January 25, 2016 - 17:00 PST to Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 0:30 PST
Location

The IRMACS Theatre
Room ASB 10900
Simon Fraser University

Registation / More Information:

For more information, please email Alex Razoumov - alex.razoumov@westgrid.ca.

Speaker Info
Félix-Antoine Fortin
Calcul Quebec
Description

Join Compute Canada and IRMACS for a hands-on workshop exploring the use of Apache Spark, a fast and general engine for large-scale data processing. Spark provides high-level APIs in Java, Scala, Python and R, and an optimized engine that supports general execution graphs. It also supports a rich set of higher-level tools including Spark SQL for SQL and structured data processing, MLlib for machine learning, GraphXfor graph processing, and Spark Streaming.

Abstract:
With over 450 contributors, Apache Spark has become one of the most important open-source projects for Big Data. Based on the concept of in-memory data processing, Spark can achieve performance up to 100 times that of Hadoop. During this course, we will introduce Apache Spark and explain how to use cluster computing resources, like the ones available in Compute Canada, to analyze a large amount of data. A special attention will be given to interactive analysis with Jupyter (IPython Notebook).

Duration:
One day divided in two blocks of 3 hours

Requirements

Skills:

  • Functional knowledge of Unix command line
    • manipulating files and archives (tarball)
    • connecting to a remote server with ssh
    • retrieving files from a distant server
  • Python programming language
    • importing a module
    • manipulating strings
    • creating functions
    • familiarity with anonymous functions (lambda)

Computer and software requirements:

  • Laptop with internet access
  • Recent web browser (Chrome or Firefox)
  • Virtualbox 5.0 (https://www.virtualbox.org/)
  • Putty (Windows) or SSH client (Mac OS X / Linux)

Course plan:

1. Introduction

1.1 Introduction to Big Data
1.2 Presentation of the Map-Reduce paradigm
1.3 Presentation of Spark founding principles

2. Working with Spark

2.1 Spark Introduction, working with RDD
2.2 Working with key-value pairs
2.3 Spark SQL
2.4 Running and monitoring a Spark cluster
2.5 Machine learning with Spark

About the instructor:
Félix-Antoine Fortin is an advanced computing analyst at Calcul Québec since 2015. He is also completing a PhD in computer engineering on estimation of distribution algorithms for multimodal optimization. He has a strong interest in everything related to data analytics, advanced computing and big data. His language of choice since 2010 is Python, and he is one of the main contributors to the open-source framework DEAP (Distributed Evolutionary Algorithms in Python).

Date:
Saturday, January 16, 2016 - 17:00 PST to Monday, January 18, 2016 - 0:30 PST
Location

Room LSC3
2350 Health Sciences Mall

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing.

Compute Canada is partnering with Ecosystem Services, Commercialization Platforms and Entrepreneurship (ECOSCOPE) to host a two-day Software Carpentry workshop at the University of British Columbia. This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help each other and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

For more information on what is taught and why, please see the paper "Best Practices for Scientific Computing".

Who: The course is aimed at graduate students and other researchers. You don't need to be a WestGrid user or have any previous knowledge of the tools or skills that will be presented at the workshop.

When: Saturday, January 16 & Sunday, January 17, 9:00 am - 4:30 pm (both days)

Where: Room LSC3, 2350 Health Sciences Mall, University of British Columbia

Requirements: Participants must bring a laptop with the software packages LISTED HERE installed prior to the workshop. Participants must also abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.

Contact: Please email Alex Razoumov - alex.razoumove@westgrid.ca for more information.

About ECOSCOPE:
The Ecosystem Services, Commercialization Platforms and Entrepreneurship (ECOSCOPE) industrial stream NSERC CREATE training program provides UBC undergraduate and graduate students, and post-docs with the skills needed to translate environmental sequence information derived from studying microbial communities in natural and engineered ecosystems into commercial and entrepreneurial activities. ECOSCOPE increases capacity for highly qualified personnel (HQP) training in microbial ecology and biological engineering, allowing for team internships in start-up environments, and providing professional and entrepreneurial training to augment research skills and empower HQP to commercialize their innovations. For more information, visit the ECOSCOPE website.

Date:
Monday, February 22, 2016 - 17:00 PST to Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 0:30 PST
Location

Room EME 1153
3333 University Way
University of British Columbia Okanagan

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. This two-day hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help each other and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

For more information on what is taught and why, please see the paper "Best Practices for Scientific Computing".

Who: The course is aimed at graduate students and other researchers. You don't need to be a WestGrid user or have any previous knowledge of the tools or skills that will be presented at the workshop.

When: Monday, February 22 and Tuesday, February 23 -- 9:00 am - 4:30 pm (both days)

Where: Room EME 1153, 3333 University Way, University of British Columbia Okanagan

Requirements: Participants must bring a laptop with the software packages LISTED HERE installed prior to the workshop. Participants must also abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.

Contact: Please email Alex Razoumov - alex.razoumove@westgrid.ca for more information.

Date:
Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - 17:00 PST to Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 0:30 PST
Location

Room EME 2202
University of British Columbia Okanagan

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

WestGrid is pleased to present a free hands-on workshop on scientific visualization using ParaView.

ParaView is an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization application. ParaView users can quickly build visualizations to analyze their data using qualitative and quantitative techniques. This workshop will explore the basics of scientific visualization with 2- and 3-dimensional data sets through hands-on exercises.

Attendees will need to bring a laptop and should have ParaView installed on their laptop before the workshop. To download ParaView, click here.

Workshop Outline:

  • Scientific visualization overview
  • ParaView interface
  • 2D and 3D visualization
  • Scientific datasets and formats
  • Putting it all together: creating a visualization pipeline, using filters
  • Python scripting in ParaView
  • Animation
  • Remote and batch-mode visualization using WestGrid resources

Who Should Attend:

All disciplines and experience levels are welcome. You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing data sets is invited to attend.

Date:
Location

Room 101, Michael Smith Labs
University of British Columbia

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

As part of its second Sustainable Planning for Advanced Research Computing (SPARC2) initiative and in preparation for future submissions to the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), Compute Canada is asking for feedback from the broad research community on its data storage requirements and high performance computing needs over the next five years.

Who Should Participate?
Any WestGrid / Compute Canada user (or future user) as well as members of the broader research community from all disciplines (i.e. faculty, grad students, VPR/AVPR, Research Services Office, IT staff, industry, government, funders, etc.) are invited and encouraged to participate. No RSVP is required to attend.

In addition to this in-person consultation session, members of the Canadian research community can also get involved by:

For more information on the SPARC2 consultation process, visit the Compute Canada website.

Date:
Location

Room 10900 (IRMACS Theatre), IRMACS Centre
Simon Fraser University

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

As part of its second Sustainable Planning for Advanced Research Computing (SPARC2) initiative and in preparation for future submissions to the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), Compute Canada is asking for feedback from the broad research community on its data storage requirements and high performance computing needs over the next five years.

Who Should Participate?
Any WestGrid / Compute Canada user (or future user) as well as members of the broader research community from all disciplines (i.e. faculty, grad students, VPR/AVPR, Research Services Office, IT staff, industry, government, funders, etc.) are invited and encouraged to participate. No RSVP is required to attend.

In addition to this in-person consultation session, members of the Canadian research community can also get involved by:

For more information on the SPARC2 consultation process, visit the Compute Canada website.

Date:
Thursday, January 14, 2016 - 22:00 PST to Friday, January 15, 2016 - 0:00 PST
Location

Room 660, Engineering / Computer Science (ECS) Building
University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

As part of its Sustainable Planning for Advanced Research Computing (SPARC) initiative and in preparation for future submissions to the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), Compute Canada is asking for feedback from the broad research community on its data storage requirements and high performance computing needs over the next five years.

Who Should Participate?
Any WestGrid / Compute Canada user (or future user) as well as members of the broader research community from all disciplines (i.e. faculty, grad students, VPR/AVPR, Research Services Office, IT staff, industry, government, funders, etc.) are invited and encouraged to participate. No RSVP is required to attend.

In addition to this in-person consultation session, members of the Canadian research community can also get involved by:

For more information on the SPARC2 consultation process, visit the Compute Canada website.

Date:
Wednesday, January 27, 2016 - 22:00 MST to Thursday, January 28, 2016 - 0:00 MST
Location

Room 3-33, Computing Sciences Centre
University of Alberta

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

As part of its second Sustainable Planning for Advanced Research Computing (SPARC) initiative and in preparation for future submissions to the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), Compute Canada is asking for feedback from the broad research community on its data storage requirements and high performance computing needs over the next five years.

Who Should Participate?
Any WestGrid / Compute Canada user (or future user) as well as members of the broader research community from all disciplines (i.e. faculty, grad students, VPR/AVPR, Research Services Office, IT staff, industry, government, funders, etc.) are invited and encouraged to participate. No RSVP is required to attend.

In addition to this in-person consultation session, members of the Canadian research community can also get involved by:

For more information on the SPARC2 consultation process, visit the Compute Canada website.

Date:
Location

Room 258, St. Paul's College Building
University of Manitoba

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

As part of its second Sustainable Planning for Advanced Research Computing (SPARC) initiative and in preparation for future submissions to the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), Compute Canada is asking for feedback from the broad research community on its data storage requirements and high performance computing needs over the next five years.

Who Should Participate?
Any WestGrid / Compute Canada user (or future user) as well as members of the broader research community from all disciplines (i.e. faculty, grad students, VPR/AVPR, Research Services Office, IT staff, industry, government, funders, etc.) are invited and encouraged to participate. No RSVP is required to attend.

In addition to this in-person consultation session, members of the Canadian research community can also get involved by:

For more information on the SPARC2 consultation process, visit the Compute Canada website.

Date:
Location

Room 2D71, Agriculture Building
University of Saskatchewan

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

As part of its second Sustainable Planning for Advanced Research Computing (SPARC) initiative and in preparation for future submissions to the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), Compute Canada is asking for feedback from the broad research community on its data storage requirements and high performance computing needs over the next five years.

Who Should Participate?
Any WestGrid / Compute Canada user (or future user) as well as members of the broader research community from all disciplines (i.e. faculty, grad students, VPR/AVPR, Research Services Office, IT staff, industry, government, funders, etc.) are invited and encouraged to participate. No RSVP is required to attend.

In addition to this in-person consultation session, members of the Canadian research community can also get involved by:

For more information on the SPARC2 consultation process, visit the Compute Canada website.

Date:
Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 21:30 PST to Friday, February 12, 2016 - 0:30 PST
Location

Room 660, Engineering/Computer Science (ECS) Building
University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:

Space is limited, so registration is required. If you have questions about the session, please contact Belaid Moa: bmoa@uvic.ca.

Speaker Info
Belaid Moa
Advanced Research Computing Specialist
Compute Canada / WestGrid / University Systems, University of Victoria
Description

From February to May, WestGrid staff at the University of Victoria will be hosting a series of free workshops that cover a wide spectrum of techniques and tools to help researchers deal with small and big data challenges. Each session will include hands-on exercises.

Pre-requisite experience:
Basic programming knowledge is required to participate in each session's hands-on exercises. If you have questions about what specific knowledge or skill is required, please contact Belaid Moa: bmoa@uvic.ca.

Note:
You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about advanced programming is invited to attend. All disciplines are welcome.

Session Description:
Have you heard the term "big data" and wondered what exactly it is? Are you interested in knowing what tools you can use to leverage your data? Do you want some hands-on practice with handling big data? If you answered yes to any of these questions, this workshop is for you. In this first workshop, we will together explore the big data realm and provide attendees with the necessary background before embarking on their big data initiatives. We will then go in more details through the big data workflow and show how the Hadoop ecosystem fit in. More specifically, we will dive into Hadoop, Spark and HBase as well as other big data tools. Hands-on examples and exercises will be used to get acquainted with the big data realm. Attendees are required to have basic programming knowledge if they are interested in following the hands-on examples.

Date:
Thursday, March 10, 2016 - 21:30 PST to Friday, March 11, 2016 - 0:30 PST
Location

Room 660, Engineering/Computer Science (ECS) Building
University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:

Space is limited, so registration is required. If you have

 

questions about the session, please contact Belaid Moa: bmoa@uvic.ca.

Speaker Info
Belaid Moa
Advanced Research Computing Specialist
Compute Canada / WestGrid / University Systems, University of Victoria
Description

From February to May, WestGrid staff at the University of Victoria will be hosting a series of free workshops that cover a wide spectrum of techniques and tools to help researchers deal with small and big data challenges. Each session will include hands-on exercises.

Pre-requisite experience:
Basic programming knowledge is required to participate in each session's hands-on exercises. If you have questions about what specific knowledge or skill is required, please contact Belaid Moa: bmoa@uvic.ca.

Note:
You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about advanced programming is invited to attend. All disciplines are welcome.

Session Descrption:
In this second workshop, we will embrace big data analytics. We dive into the mapreduce and illustrate why Hadoop’s mapreduce is taken over by Spark. Spark’s machinery including RDDs, transformations and actions will be fully studied. We will also discuss how to set up your Spark cluster. Hands-on examples and exercises will be included. Attendees are required to have basic programming knowledge if they are interested in following the hands-on examples.

Please note: This is an in-person session only, delivered on the University of Victoria campus (ECS 660). The workshop is not being webstreamed or recorded.

If you have any questions regarding the presenter's slides attached below, please contact Belaid Moa: bmoa@uvic.ca.

Date:
Location

Room 660, Engineering/Computer Science (ECS) Building
University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:

Space is limited, so registration is required. If you have questions about the session, please contact Belaid Moa: bmoa@uvic.ca.

Speaker Info
Belaid Moa
Advanced Research Computing Specialist
Compute Canada / WestGrid / University Systems, University of Victoria
Description

From February to May, WestGrid staff at the University of Victoria will be hosting a series of free workshops that cover a wide spectrum of techniques and tools to help researchers deal with small and big data challenges. Each session will include hands-on exercises.

Pre-requisite experience:
Basic programming knowledge is required to participate in each session's hands-on exercises. If you have questions about what specific knowledge or skill is required, please contact Belaid Moa: bmoa@uvic.ca.

Note:
You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about advanced programming is invited to attend. All disciplines are welcome.

Session Description:
The beauty of the Julia programming language is outstanding. In this workshop, we will illustrate such beauty by covering many features of Julia, including its high performance and distributed parallel execution. Starting with HelloWorld-like examples and ending with advanced parallel and distributed examples, workshop attendees will gain enough knowledge to write their own programs and solve their own computational problems in Julia. We will also illustrate the power of Julia in handling big data analytics.

Please note: This is an in-person session only, delivered on the University of Victoria campus (ECS 660). The workshop is not being webstreamed or recorded. If you would like a copy of the presenter's slides, please contact Belaid Moa: bmoa@uvic.ca.

Date:
Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 17:00 MST to Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 0:30 MST
Location

ECHA L1-250
University of Alberta

Registation / More Information:

Full course information and a link to register can be found here. If you have any questions about the course or its content, please contact John Simpson at john.simpson@computecanada.ca.

Speaker Info
Description

Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

For more information on what is taught and why, please see the paper "Best Practices for Scientific Computing".

Please note that this particular Software Carpentry course is targeted specifically at graduate students and other researchers in the humanities and will primarily feature examples and techniques suitable for this community.

Pre-requisites:
You don't need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Course Description:
Click here for a full course description. 

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Hossein Pourreza
HPC Specialist
Compute Canada / WestGrid / University of Manitoba
Description

This online workshop will build on the Intro to OpenMP: Part 1 session. This session will delve deeper into using OpenMP and introduce new OpenMP directives to tackle hard-to-parallelize problems. Participants will be led through a series of hands-on, interactive examples during the workshop, focusing on the following topics:

  • Review of the loop parallelism (from last webinar)
  • Load balancing
  • Conditional multithreading

Who Should Attend:

  • This session is intended for current Compute Canada account holders who have experience with programming in C/C++ or FORTRAN and would like to learn how to use OpenMP directives in their code.

Pre-Requisite Skills / Knowledge:

  • All attendees must have either attended the Intro to OpenMP: Part 1 session on Feb 25, or have sufficient knowledge of the topics covered in that session.
  • All attendees must have familiarity with logging in to WestGrid systems, using UNIX and basic job script commands. If you are a new user who has never written C/C++ or FORTRAN code before, this session may not be suited for you at this time.
  • All attendees must have accounts with Compute Canada and WestGrid.
  • All attendess must login to the Grex system prior to the session (or have prior experience doing this) to test their connection to the system.

How to Participate:

  • Anyone interested should register for the session on Eventbrite
  • The session will be delivered using Vidyo (online videoconferencing software). Instructions will be sent for how to connect to the session will be sent 1-2 days prior to the session.

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions about this session.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Please register online to be sent connection details for the online session.

Speaker Info
Description

As part of its Sustainable Planning for Advanced Research Computing Phase II (SPARC2) initiative, and in preparation for future operations and capital planning submissions to the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), Compute Canada is asking for feedback from the broad research community on its data storage requirements and high performance computing needs over the next five years.

Who Should Participate?
Any WestGrid / Compute Canada user (or future user) as well as members of the broader research community from all disciplines (i.e. faculty, grad students, VPR/AVPR, Research Services Office, IT staff, industry, government, funders, etc.) are invited and encouraged to participate. No RSVP is required to attend.

In addition to this online information session, members of the Canadian research community can also get involved by:

For more information on the SPARC2 consultation process, visit the Compute Canada website.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Hossein Pourreza
HPC Specialist
Compute Canada / WestGrid / University of Manitoba
Description

This online workshop explores how to use OpenMP to improve the speed of serial jobs on multi-core machines. Participants are led through a series of hands-on, interactive examples, focusing on multi-threading parallel programming.

The topics covered include:

  • Basic OpenMP operations
  • Loops
  • Reduction variables

Who Should Attend:

  • This session is intended for current Compute Canada account holders who have experience with programming in C/C++ or FORTRAN and would like to learn how to use OpenMP directives in their code.

Pre-Requisite Skills / Knowledge:

  • All attendees must have familiarity with logging in to WestGrid systems, using UNIX and basic job script commands. If you are a new user who has never written C/C++ or FORTRAN code before, this session may not be suited for you at this time.
  • All attendees must have accounts with Compute Canada and WestGrid.
  • All attendess must login to the Grex system prior to the session (or have prior experience doing this) to test their connection to the system.

How to Participate:

  • Anyone interested should register for the session on Eventbrite
  • The session will be delivered using Vidyo (online videoconferencing software). Instructions will be sent for how to connect to the session will be sent 1-2 days prior to the session.

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions about this session.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Hossein Pourreza
HPC Specialist
Compute Canada / WestGrid / University of Manitoba
Description

This online workshop will build on the Intro to OpenMP: Part 1 session and the Delving Deeper into OpenMP: Part 2 sessions. As the final session in this OpenMP series, this webinar will delve into Open ACC. Participants will be led through a series of hands-on, interactive examples during the workshop.

Who Should Attend:

  • This session is intended for current Compute Canada account holders who have experience with programming in C/C++ or FORTRAN and would like to learn how to use OpenMP directives in their code.

Pre-Requisite Skills / Knowledge:

  • All attendees must have either attended the Intro to OpenMP: Part 1 session or Delving Deeper into OpenMP: Part 2, or have sufficient knowledge of the topics covered in those sessions.
  • All attendees must have familiarity with logging in to WestGrid systems, using UNIX and basic job script commands. If you are a new user who has never written C/C++ or FORTRAN code before, this session may not be suited for you at this time.
  • All attendees must have accounts with Compute Canada and WestGrid.

How to Participate:

  • Anyone interested should register for the session on Eventbrite
  • The session will be delivered using Vidyo (online videoconferencing software). Instructions will be sent for how to connect to the session will be sent 1-2 days prior to the session.

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions about this session.

Date:
Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 17:00 PST to Sunday, March 13, 2016 - 23:30 PDT
Location

Room LSC3
2350 Health Sciences Mall
University of British Columbia

Registation / More Information:

More Information / Full workshop details: 

http://computecanada.github.io/2016-03-12-ubc

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid / Compute Canada
Description

Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing.

Compute Canada is partnering with Ecosystem Services, Commercialization Platforms and Entrepreneurship (ECOSCOPE) to host a two-day Software Carpentry workshop at the University of British Columbia. This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help each other and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

For more information on what is taught and why, please see the paper "Best Practices for Scientific Computing".

Who: The course is aimed at graduate students and other researchers. You don't need to be a WestGrid user or have any previous knowledge of the tools or skills that will be presented at the workshop.

When: Saturday, March 12 & Sunday, March 13, 9:00 am - 4:30 pm (both days)

Where: Room LSC3, 2350 Health Sciences Mall, University of British Columbia

Requirements: Participants must bring a laptop with the software packages LISTED HERE installed prior to the workshop. Participants must also abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.

Contact: Please email Alex Razoumov - alex.razoumove@westgrid.ca for more information.

About ECOSCOPE:
The Ecosystem Services, Commercialization Platforms and Entrepreneurship (ECOSCOPE) industrial stream NSERC CREATE training program provides UBC undergraduate and graduate students, and post-docs with the skills needed to translate environmental sequence information derived from studying microbial communities in natural and engineered ecosystems into commercial and entrepreneurial activities. ECOSCOPE increases capacity for highly qualified personnel (HQP) training in microbial ecology and biological engineering, allowing for team internships in start-up environments, and providing professional and entrepreneurial training to augment research skills and empower HQP to commercialize their innovations. For more information, visit the ECOSCOPE website.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
John Simpson
Digital Humanities Specialist
Compute Canada
Description

Earlier this year, Compute Canada launched a cloud development environment that will enable researchers to customize virtual machines to meet unique needs, avoid job queues, and have the ability to work interactively. 

This one-hour online tutorial will focus on getting started with the Compute Canada Cloud. Through hands-on demonstrations, this introductory tutorial will cover how to log in and set up your account, as well as explore some of the unique features of the development environment.

There are two ways to participate in this session:

  1. Watch Online
    (for anyone who doesn't have a Compute Canada account or a Cloud account)

    Even if you don't have a Compute Canada account or a Compute Canada Cloud account, you can follow along by watching via live webstream. Just click on the link below at the start of the session (9AM Pacific / 10AM Mountain / 11AM Central / 12PM Eastern / 1PM Atlantic).
    Webstream link
    http://vidyoreplay.computecanada.ca/replay/webcastShow.html?key=OESkFzHeCEwJLb5
    Note:
     Anyone watching via the webstream can submit questions to the speaker at any time during the session by
    :
  2. Participate via Videoconference
    (for current Compute Canada account and Cloud account holders)

    If you have any questions about this option or need the connection instructions for this participation method sent to you again, please email info@westgrid.ca

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions about this session.


Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

WestGrid is pleased to present an online tutorial on Graph Visualization with Gephi, a leading open-source package for network (graph) visualization. In this hour-long webinar, we'll take a look at the ways Gephi modules can import, visualize, and manipulate all types of networks and use hardware acceleration to speed up rendering, allowing interactive exploration of networks up to tens of thousands of nodes.

Gephi features multiple highly configurable force-directed layout algorithms where users can specify speed, gravity, repulsion, etc. and see graphs adjust dynamically in real time, while optimizing graph readability. Gephi also includes many metrics to measure graphs, such as the degree of connectedness, density, clustering coefficients, path lengths, modularity, and many others.

Since Gephi is a tool for exploratory data analysis, its primary use is on personal rather than HPC systems, although the Gephi toolkit (not covered in this presentation) provides access to Gephimodules from any Java application that can be launched from a command line.

How to Participate:

  • Anyone interested should register for the session on Eventbrite
  • The session will be delivered using Vidyo (online videoconferencing software). Instructions will be sent for how to connect to the session will be sent 1-2 days prior to the session.

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions about this session. 

Date:
Monday, May 30, 2016 - 7:00 MDT to Wednesday, June 1, 2016 - 7:00 MDT
Location

University of Calgary

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

Each year, CSDH/SCHN hosts an annual conference at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. This year the conference will be held at the University of Calgary from May 30 to June 1st, and features plenary talks by Diane Jakacki and Tara McPherson. Join us for panels, an awards ceremony, a digital demo session, a graduate student lunch, the AGM, and more! The preliminary schedule is now online and registration is open.

Canadian Society of Digital Humanities:
CSDH/SCHN is the scholarly association for Digital Humanities in Canada and beyond. It is a member of the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO), please see more information about membership.

Congress 2016:
Unrivaled in scope and impact, the annual Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences is the convergence of approximately 70 scholarly associations, each holding their annual conference under one umbrella. Now in its 85th year, this flagship event is much more than Canada’s largest gathering of scholars. Congress brings together academics, researchers, policy-makers, and practitioners to share findings, refine ideas, and build partnerships that will help shape the Canada of tomorrow.

Date:
Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 7:00 MDT to Friday, July 1, 2016 - 7:00 MDT
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

The International HPC Summer School is sponsored by Compute Canada, the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) with funds from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe (PRACE) and the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (RIKEN AICS).

Leading European, Canadian, Japanese and American computational scientists and HPC technologists offer instruction on a variety of topics, including:

  • HPC challenges by discipline (e.g, earth, life and materials sciences, physics)
  • HPC Programming Proficiencies
  • Performance analysis and profiling
  • Algorithmic approaches and numerical libraries
  • Data-intensive computing
  • Scientific visualization
  • Canadian, EU, Japanese and U.S. HPC-infrastructures
Date:
Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 16:00 MDT to Friday, April 29, 2016 - 23:00 MDT
Location

Business B-24
University of Alberta

Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Description

WestGrid is hosting a Software Carpentry at the University of Alberta that will focus on text manipulation. Graduate students and other researchers from any disciplinary background are welcome. No previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop is needed.

Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing.

For more information on what is taught and why, please see the paper "Best Practices for Scientific Computing".

When: Thursday, April 28 @ 9:00 am to Friday, April 29 @ 4:00 pm

Where: Business B-24, University of Alberta

Requirements: Participants must bring a laptop with the software packages LISTED HERE installed prior to the workshop. Participants must also abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.

Full Course Description: http://computecanada.github.io/2016-04-28-ualberta/

Contact: Please email John Simpson - john.simpson@computecanada.ca for more information.

 

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

Continuing with the topic of graphs/networks from our Gephi workshop in March, WestGrid is pleased to present an online tutorial that looks at 3D graph visualization with NetworkX, VTK, and ParaView.

Options for 3D graph visualization and analysis are very limited, confined primarily to short-lived research projects or legacy tools that can still be downloaded but are no longer maintained and updated. The reason for this is the popularity of 2D tools such as Gephi and Cytoscape and the expectation that in 3D complex networks will look messy, with some structures occluding others. On the other hand, in 3D layouts we can encode three independent attributes and visualize some unique connection topologies that will be lost in 2D.

Pre-Requisite Knowledge:
To follow the material, we expect attendees to have some basic knowledge of Python, however there is no need to have a WestGrid / Compute Canada account.

 If you have any questions about this session or would like more information, please contact us.

 

The visualization pictured above is an example of what will be shown and discussed in the tutorial. It is a 6th-generation Dorogovtsev-Goltsev-Mendes graph in which the nodes are coloured by the number of connections.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

For more information, visit the ACENET website

Speaker Info
Description

As one of Compute Canada's four regional partners, ACENET is a consortium of universities in Atlantic Canada serving the computationally-based research needs of its users.

Each Spring, ACENET delivers intoductory and advanced training sessions to help users learn more about ACENET and Compute Canada as well as hone their advanced computing skills. This particular session is being broadcast online, so will be available for anyone to tune in, no matter their geographic location. The session covers the first two parts of ACENET’s Basics Training: Introduction to ACENET and Introduction to the Unix Command Line.

Session Description:

What is ACENET and what can it do for you? What hardware and software is available? How do you get an account? Once you’ve got an account, then what? How do you use a command line interface? This two-hour online training session will answer all those questions and more!

Pre-Requisites:

This session is oriented to new users of ACENET and Compute Canada systems. Participants should bring a laptop computer to the sessions and register for a Compute Canada and ACENET account beforehand. See http://www.ace-net.ca/get-an-account/ for more information.

This workshop is being broadcast online. Connection details will be sent to all registrants before the event.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

For more information, visit the ACENET website.

Speaker Info
Description

As one of Compute Canada's four regional partners, ACENET is a consortium of universities in Atlantic Canada serving the computationally-based research needs of its users.

Each Spring, ACENET delivers intoductory and advanced training sessions to help users learn more about ACENET and Compute Canada as well as hone their advanced computing skills. This particular session is being broadcast online, so will be available for anyone to tune in, no matter their geographic location. The session will present an Introduction to Shell Scripting and Job Management with Grid Engine.

Session Description:

The first part of this workshop will focus on shell scripting. Participants will learn how to exercise the power of the command line with shell scripting. For those familiar with working in a Unix/Linux environment but have had no experience with shell scripting.

In the second half, participants will be introduced to N1GE production job management software (Grid Engine). Learn how the job scheduler works, and how to make it efficiently manage and troubleshoot jobs on ACENET clusters.

Pre-Requisites:

This session is oriented to new users of ACENET and Compute Canada systems. Participants should bring a laptop computer to the sessions and register for a Compute Canada and ACENET account beforehand. See http://www.ace-net.ca/get-an-account/ for more information.

This workshop is being broadcast online. Connection details will be sent to all registrants before the event.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
John Simpson
Digital Humanities Specialist
Compute Canada
Description

Got data? We can help! Compute Canada delivers world-class infrastructure and support to Canadian researchers and innovators and is powered by a nationally coordinated network of advanced research computing hardware and software resources. Compute Canada has the tools and staff to help you better manage, share, and get the most out of your research data.

WestGrid is pleased to present this online workshop that will explore two free and easy-to-use data management tools available to all Compute Canada users:

Pre-requisite Knowledge / Requirements:
To participate in the session’s hands-on demonstrations, you will need to complete the following steps prior to May 10. Account requests can take up to 2-3 business days to process so please allow adequate lead time prior to the session.

  1. Register for this session by clicking the "Register Online" button on this page. 
  2. Ensure you have a Compute Canada and WestGrid account. To register for a Compute Canada account, click here. Instructions for registering for a WestGrid account can be found here. An ownCloud account is automatically created for you once you have a WestGrid account. 
  3. Create a Compute Canada Globus account. To register for an account, click here
  4. Note: Having basic U/Linux knowledge and script command use is required for participating in the demonstration.

 

 If you have any questions about this session or would like more information, please contact us.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Masao Fujinaga
Programmer Analyst, Information Services & Technology
University of Alberta
Description

Hosted by WestGrid, this two-hour online tutorial is targeted at new WestGrid account holders and will provide step-by-step demonstrations for getting started using WestGrid computing facilities.

This introductory-level session will include hands-on demonstrations of how to log in, submit jobs, move data, and troubleshoot problems. Any faculty members and graduate students in any discipline who have a WestGrid account are invited to attend.

Prerequisite Knowledge and Requirements:

  • You must be able to log into jasper.westgrid.ca to participate in this session.
  • Basic knowledge of Unix/Linux and scripting (or similar experience) is required. At minimum, participants should know:
    • What a man page is.
    • How to edit, copy, and delete files.
    • How to use top and ps to see resources used of a process.
    • What unix environment variables are, how to set and display them.

 If you have any questions about this session, please contact us.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Description

As a follow-up to its webinar, Introduction to the Compute Canada Cloud, Compute Canada is hosting an online 'Office Hours' session with its Cloud Support Team. If you have questions about using Compute Canada's cloud computing resources, or you are an existing user with an issue you'd like to troubleshoot with our experts, this session is for you!

How It Works:
We will have our Cloud Support Team online and available to answer questions between 10:00 - 11:00 am Pacific. You can pop in at any time within that Office Hour timeslot. Registering online and submitting your questions in advance will help ensure you leave the session with the answers you need!

How To Participate:
RSVP by clicking the "Register Online" button on this page. Prior to the session, all registrants will be sent instructions for how to connect to the online session.

Date:
Location

ECHA 1-490
University of Alberta

Registation / More Information:

To register or for more information, visit the RDM website.

Speaker Info
John Simpson
Digital Humanities Specialist
Compute Canada
Description

Research Data Management (RDM) Week is happenig May 2-6, 2016 at the University of Alberta. As part of the program, WestGrid / Compute Canada staff based at the university are offering a number of ARC-related training sessions.

This session will offer attendees an overview of the various supports and services that Compute Canada offers to researchers across the UofA campus and will be of interest to those across disciplines and stages of their research careers.

Date:
Location

ETLC 5-013
University of Alberta

Registation / More Information:

To register or for more information, visit the RDM website.

Speaker Info
Kamil Marcinkowski
System Analyst
University of Alberta
,
Erming Pei
Systems Analyst
University of Alberta
Description

Research Data Management (RDM) Week is happenig May 2-6, 2016 at the University of Alberta. As part of the program, WestGrid / Compute Canada staff based at the university are offering a number of ARC-related training sessions.

This session is intended for beginners, as well as experienced HPC users looking for a refresher on basic HPC terminology and procedures. We begin with a brief discussion of Compute Canada and WestGrid organizations. After that, we introduce and define major concepts of High Performance Computing (HPC), including cluster, grid, cloud and “big data.” The discussion ends with a guided tour of the IST data centre and an opportunity to have all your HPC questions answered by our in-house experts.

Date:
Location

ETLC 5-013
University of Alberta

Registation / More Information:

To register or for more information, visit the RDM website.

Speaker Info
John Simpson
Digital Humanities Specialist
Compute Canada
Description

Research Data Management (RDM) Week is happenig May 2-6, 2016 at the University of Alberta. As part of the program, WestGrid / Compute Canada staff based at the university are offering a number of ARC-related training sessions.

This session is a predominantly hands-on presentation that will put three tools in the hands of participants:

  • OwnCloud (50Gb of Dropbox-like storage) 
  • Globus (Efficient, fault-tolerant, secure file transfer) 
  • Cloud (VMs, storage, and an outward facing IP address)

The last item--the Compute Canada Cloud--will focus on the administration side of working with the cloud environment. For the actual deployment and development of software within the cloud environment it is recommended that users consider the Intro to Unix/Linux session that is offered on Wednesday afternoon.

New directions in research support by Compute Canada for researchers outside of more “traditional” high performance computing fields will also be covered as an extension of the Brown Bag session held on Monday.

Date:
Location

ETLC 5-013
University of Alberta

Registation / More Information:

To register or for more information, visit the RDM website.

Speaker Info
Masao Fujinaga
Programmer Analyst
University of Alberta
Description

Research Data Management (RDM) Week is happenig May 2-6, 2016 at the University of Alberta. As part of the program, WestGrid / Compute Canada staff based at the university are offering a number of ARC-related training sessions.

This workshop session is an introduction to HPC using WestGrid. Participants are guided through the steps of transferring a program, compiling it and submitting a batch job. In the process, we discuss the software and tools available on the system, how to write scripts and where to find documentation. This session has been developed for beginner through intermediate levels of HPC users.

Prerequisite:

  • Intro to Unix/Linux and Intro to Scripting (or similar experience).
Date:
Monday, May 9, 2016 - 16:00 MDT to Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 23:00 MDT
Location

ETLC 5-013
University of Alberta

Registation / More Information:

To register or for more information, visit the RDM website.

Speaker Info
Kamil Marcinkowski
System Analyst
University of Alberta
Description

Research Data Management (RDM) Week is happenig May 2-6, 2016 at the University of Alberta. As part of the program, WestGrid / Compute Canada staff based at the university are offering a number of ARC-related training sessions, including this special "post RDM Week" workshop.

This workshop session focuses on getting the most out of a cluster using a scheduler. Participants explore how to submit jobs, including more advanced topics such as job arrays, gpus and checkpointing. In the second part, participants discuss in greater detail how a scheduler works and how to use the knowledge to your advantage. The third part builds on the knowledge gained in the first two parts through the process of discovering why jobs are not running. While intermediate and advanced topics are covered, this section is intended to help HPC users of all levels become more proficient.

Prerequisite:

  • WestGrid Basic Systems session (as part of RDM Week) or similar experience.
Date:
Monday, June 6, 2016 - 7:00 PDT to Friday, June 17, 2016 - 7:00 PDT
Location

University of Victoria

Registation / More Information:

For more information and to register for courses, visit the DHSI website

Speaker Info
Description

The Digital Humanities Summer Institute provides an ideal environment for discussing and learning about new computing technologies and how they are influencing teaching, research, dissemination, creation, and preservation in different disciplines, via a community-based approach. A time of intensive coursework, seminars, and lectures, participants at DHSI share ideas and methods, and develop expertise in using advanced technologies. Every summer, the institute brings together faculty, staff, and students from the Arts, Humanities, Library, and Archives communities as well as independent scholars and participants from areas beyond. 

For more information on the 2016 Course Offering, click here.

Date:
Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 7:00 MDT to Friday, October 28, 2016 - 7:00 MDT
Location

The Banff Centre

Registation / More Information:

For more information, visit the event website.

Speaker Info
Description

If information is power, how can we ensure that society is using it in the most accountable way possible? This October, Cybera is partnering with MRnet and SRnet to present Cyber Summit 2016, a two day summit that will focus on the privacy / policy implications of technologies related to open, big data and the Internet of Things. It will help public organizations, tech leaders, and everyday citizens understand what is fully at stake when information (both public and private) is made available online, and what legal defenses may (or may not) exist to protect them.

The Summit will take place October 27-28, 2016 at The Banff Centre in Banff, AB, with pre-conference workshops being held on October 26.

Keynote presentations will be delivered by Jill Clayton, Information and Privacy Commissioner of Alberta, and Dr. Michael Geist, law professor at the University of Ottawa and syndicated columnist on technology law issues.

Audience members will include the greatest technology minds in the west. This event will benefit everyone on the operations team — from CIOs and systems administrators, to business development and policy officers. 

For more information or to get involved, follow the links below:

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Patrick Mann
Director of Operations
WestGrid
Description

On Friday, June 10, Patrick Mann, Director of Operations, and the WestGrid Site Leads will host a Community Town Hall to address some of the recent system outages and other current demands on WestGrid and Compute Canada resources. The presentation will also provide an update on Compute Canada's technology deployment plan, including a timeline of when new systems are expected to come online. Town Hall attendees are welcome to ask questions on these and other topics.

This Town Hall is open to any existing WestGrid or Compute Canada user as well as members of the broader research community from all disciplines and departments. We have arranged for multiple ways to connect to the meeting and will record and post an archive video of the session for anyone unable to participate on June 10.

Session Details:
Friday, June 10
9-10 am PDT  //  10-11am MDT/CST  //  11am-12pm CDT

More Information:

Questions and comments are welcome at any time by sending an email to info@westgrid.ca.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Ali Kerrache
High Performance Computing - Analyst
University of Manitoba, WestGrid / Compute Canada
Description

This online webinar will share an introduction to Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations as well as explore some of the basic features and capabilities of LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator), a classical MD code.

LAMMPS has potentials for solid-state materials (metals, semiconductors) and soft matter (biomolecules, polymers) and coarse-grained or mesoscopic systems. It can be used to model atoms or, more generically, as a parallel particle simulator at the atomic, meso, or continuum scale.

Topics covered in this talk include:

  • key MD simulation concepts & definitions a walk-through of how an MD program works
  • MD simulation examples, to demonstrate what properties can be determined
  • an overview of LAMMPS and how it works (input files, output files, etc.)

Who Should Attend:

  • This is an introductory session and will forcus on sharing basic information, so no prior experience with MD simulations or LAMMPS is required.

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions you may have about this session.

Image Credit:
The image pictured above is from the LAMMPS website image gallery. It was created by Wataru Shinoda (AIST Tsukuba, Japan) in collaboration with Russell DeVane and Michael Klein (Temple U) to study self-assembly of organic molecules and their long timescale behavior using a novel coarse-grained parametrization scheme.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Erming Pei
Systems Analyst, Information Services & Technology
University of Alberta
Description

High Performance Computing (HPC) is opening new doors for researchers to tackle challenges and leverage data in new ways. This session is intended for beginners, as well as experienced HPC users looking for a refresher on basic HPC terminology and procedures.

We will begin with a brief introduction to Compute Canada and WestGrid, including an overview of the services and resources each provides to researchers. After that, we will introduce and define major concepts of HPC, including cluster, grid, cloud and “big data.”

Prerequisite Knowledge and Requirements:

  • No prior knowledge of or experience with HPC is necessary.

Who Should Attend:

  • Anyone interested in high performance computing (HPC) is welcome to attend. 
  • This session is open to all faculty, students and staff in any discipline. 

Presentation Slides:

  • A copy of the slides will be posted shortly

For more information on this session or the pre-requisites required, please contact us.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Megan Meredith-Lobay
Digital Humanities and Social Sciences Analyst
Compute Canada / WestGrid / University of British Columbia
Description

This online workshop will provide an introduction to Compute Canada and its available resources for researches in the Humanities and Social Sciences. This workshop will lead researchers through the process of getting set up on Compute Canada and how to best use all the tools and services available.

The topics covered include:

  • Getting a Compute Canada and Consortium Account
  • How to get access to and use the Compute Canada Cloud and ownCloud (cloud storage tool)
  • Examples of projects currently using CC Resources

Prerequisite Knowledge and Requirements:

  • No previous knowledge or experience required. This session is intended as an information session only so no hands on experience is necessary.

Who Should Attend:

  • This session is intended for any Humanities or Social Sciences scholar interested in taking advantage of CC infrastructure and resources for their research.

Speaker Bio:

Megan Meredith-Lobay is the Digital Humanities and Social Sciences Analyst for the Advanced Research Computing Department at the University of British Columbia. In addition, Megan serves on the Compute Canada Digital Humanities and Software Carpentry National Teams as well as the Educause Center for Analysis and Research / Centre for Networked Information Digital Humanites Working Group. She holds a PhD from the University of Cambridge in medieval archaeology where she used a variety of computing resources to investigate ritual landscapes in Late Iron Age Scotland. Megan worked at the University of Alberta where she supported research computing for the Faculty of Arts, and at the University of Oxford where she was the programme coordinator for Digital Social Research, an Economic and Social Research Council project to promote advanced ICT in Social Science research. Most recently, Megan coordinated the Research Ethics Board at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Surrey.

Date:
Location
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Speaker Info
Eugene Barsky
Research Data Librarian, Library Administration
University of British Columbia
Description

In Canada, as in many developed countries, requirements for data management are being established across a wide range of scholarly disciplines. In this presentation, Eugene Barsky from the University of British Columbia's ARC Team will offer UBC Library expertise in managing thousands of data files with Dataverse software.

UBC Abacus Dataverse (http://dvn.library.ubc.ca/dvn/) is open-source software, developed by Harvard, which allows researchers to share, cite, preserve, discover, and analyze research data. Dataverse is designed as a self-serve platform, where individual researchers, research teams, and institutes can create their own account and deposit their own data. Dataverse has proven to be a flexible platform that can support many models for research data management services. It offers a range of features that improve data discoverability and access. It also does a good job of managing data files from a preservation perspective: it manages versions, conducts checksums to maintain data integrity, and supports persistent identifiers.

In this session we will cover how to:

  • Create and change records
  • Metadata, types of metadata, standards
  • Uploading files, large files, zipping
  • Version control
  • Tabular analysis in your browser
  • Granular access to datasets: public, institutional, groups
  • UNFs for data analysis
  • OAI for discoverability

Prerequisite Knowledge and Requirements:

  • No previous knowledge or experience required. 

Who Should Attend:

  • Any researcher interested in best practices for research data management is welcome to attend.
  • This session is open to all faculty, students and staff in any discipline. 

 

For more information on this session or the pre-requisites required, please contact us.

Date:
Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 16:00 PDT to Friday, September 30, 2016 - 23:30 PDT
Location

Room 1330, 2350 Health Sciences Mall
University of British Columbia

Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Description

Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing.

Compute Canada is partnering with Ecosystem Services, Commercialization Platforms and Entrepreneurship (ECOSCOPE) to host a two-day Software Carpentry workshop at the University of British Columbia. This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help each other and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

For more information on what is taught and why, please see the paper "Best Practices for Scientific Computing".

COURSE SCHEDULE & OUTLINE

To view the course schedule and outline, CLICK HERE.

OTHER DETAILS

Who Should Attend: The course is aimed at graduate students and other researchers. You don't need to be a WestGrid user or have any previous knowledge of the tools or skills that will be presented at the workshop.

When: Thursday, September 29 to Friday, September 30, 9:00 am - 4:30 pm (both days)

Where: Room 1330, 2350 Health Sciences Mall, University of British Columbia

Requirements: Participants must bring a laptop with a Mac, Linux, or Windows operating sytem (not a tablet, Chromebook, etc.) on which they have administrative privileges. The software packages listed here must be installed prior to the workshop. Participants must also abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.

Contact: Please email Alex Razoumov - alex.razoumove@westgrid.ca for more information.

ABOUT ECOSCOPE
The Ecosystem Services, Commercialization Platforms and Entrepreneurship (ECOSCOPE) industrial stream NSERC CREATE training program provides UBC undergraduate and graduate students, and post-docs with the skills needed to translate environmental sequence information derived from studying microbial communities in natural and engineered ecosystems into commercial and entrepreneurial activities. ECOSCOPE increases capacity for highly qualified personnel (HQP) training in microbial ecology and biological engineering, allowing for team internships in start-up environments, and providing professional and entrepreneurial training to augment research skills and empower HQP to commercialize their innovations. For more information, visit the ECOSCOPE website.

Date:
Monday, October 3, 2016 - 16:00 PDT to Tuesday, October 4, 2016 - 23:30 PDT
Location

Library Research Commons
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby Campus

Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada is partnering with the Simon Fraser University (SFU) Library's Research Commons to host a Software Carpentry Workshop at SFU this October. Software Carpentry's mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing.

For more information on what is taught and why, please see the paper "Best Practices for Scientific Computing".

 

COURSE SCHEDULE & OUTLINE

To view the course schedule and outline, CLICK HERE.

OTHER DETAILS

Who Should Attend: The course is aimed at graduate students and other researchers. You don't need to be a WestGrid user or have any previous knowledge of the tools or skills that will be presented at the workshop.

When: Monday, October 03 - Tuesday, October 04 from 9:00 am - 4:30 pm (both days)

Where: Library Research Commons, SFU, Burnaby Campus

Requirements: Participants must bring a laptop with a Mac, Linux, or Windows operating sytem (not a tablet, Chromebook, etc.) on which they have administrative privileges. The software packages listed here must be installed prior to the workshop. Participants must also abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.

Contact: Please email Alex Razoumov - alex.razoumove@westgrid.ca for more information.

 

Date:
Location

Room 7010, Library Research Commons
Burnaby Campus, Simon Fraser University

Registation / More Information:

 

Speaker Info
Description

As part of its regular events calendar, the SciProg group at Simon Fraser University is hosting an introductory session on Git.

Session Description:
Have you been wanting to learn Git but never got around to it? Or perhaps it seems much scarier than plain old Dropbox? In this workshop, Bruno Grande will introduce the basic concepts of Git using the real-world scenario of creating a blog and publishing it online for free! If you've tried to learn Git before but struggled, give it another try with this workshop.

What is SciProg?
SciProg — short for Scientific Programming Study Group — is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing one-hour interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours. All are welcome to this study group, regardless of scientific research area, affiliation or training level. For more details, visit http://sciprog.ca/.

Date:
Wednesday, October 5, 2016 - 16:00 PDT to Thursday, October 6, 2016 - 23:30 PDT
Location

Room TBC,
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby Campus

Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Description

As part of its regular events calendar, the SciProg group at Simon Fraser University is hosting a Software Carpentry session on programming with Python.

Session Description:
This workshop is offered through SFU Library's Research Commons and registration is open to SFU graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty. Python is a popular language for scientific computing, and great for general-purpose programming as well. This 2-day hands-on Software Carpentry workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. You will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what you have learned to your own research problems.

What is SciProg?
SciProg — short for Scientific Programming Study Group — is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing one-hour interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours. All are welcome to this study group, regardless of scientific research area, affiliation or training level. For more details, visit http://sciprog.ca/.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

 

Speaker Info
Description

Have questions about using WestGrid? Having trouble using a scheduler on Compute Canada systems? Join WestGrid for an online Office Hours session. Members of our Support Team will be available to answer inquiries and troubleshoot issues on anything related to the topics covered in our September training seminars:

Bring your questions related to these and other topics!

How To Participate:

  • Click here to register online. You can use this form to submit any questions you may have in advance.
  • This session will be delivered online using Vidyo. Connection details will be sent to all registrants.

Questions / More Information:
Note: A formal presentation is not being delivered. This session offers a casual, drop-in format where users can bring their questions to be answered by WestGrid support staff live. If you would like more information about this 'Office Hours' session, please contact info@westgrid.ca.

 

Date:
Location

Room 3340, Pharmaceutical Sciences Building
2405 Wesbrook Mall
University of British Columbia

Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

WestGrid is pleased to present a free workshop on scientific visualization using VisIt, an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization tool.

With VisIt, users can interactively visualize and analyze 2- and 3-dimensional data defined on structured, adaptive, and unstructured meshes. VisIt users can also animate these datasets in time, and manipulate them with a variety of operators.

Pre-requisites:

  • Pre-registration is required. Click here to register online.
  • No prior visualization experience is required. We will provide sample data and codes for the exercises, or you can bring your own dataset if you would like to visualize it with VisIt.
  • This full-day workshop will feature many interactive hands-on exercises, so attendees will need to bring a laptop (and a powercord) they can use. The laptop should have VisIt installed (http://goo.gl/KcGWHa) prior to the workshop.

Workshop Outline:

  • Introduction and VisIt's GUI overview
  • accessing data and managing files
  • working with plots
  • working with operators
  • interactive tools
  • quantitative analysis
  • making it pretty
  • animation and keyframing
  • data comparison
  • scripting
  • plots, selections, exporting
  • overview of remote visualization resources

Please note that coffee / cookies will be provided in the morning and afternoon breaks, but there will be no organized food so attendees are responsible for their own lunch.

Who Should Attend: 
All disciplines and experience levels are welcome. You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop. Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing data sets is invited to attend.

Questions: 
If you have questions about this session, please email alex.razoumov@westgrid.ca.

 

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The featured image, courtesy of the VisIt website gallery, is a visualization showing a pseudocolor plot that highlights a Raleigh-Taylor instability caused by two mixing fluids.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Please RSVP online HERE to receive the Q&A session connection details in advance and to be emailed the dataset when it is available.

Speaker Info
Description

Compute Canada is launching an exciting new Data Visualization Challenge this fall called Visualize This.

Full details on the competition can be found on the Compute Canada website and your questions will be answered directly during this session. At the Q&A session the presenters will also share more details on the dataset, supply sample routines to read the data and demo a few basic visualization examples. 

Who is Eligible to Participate?

The competition and Q&A session is open to all researchers affiliated with a Canadian post-secondary institution (college or university). Participants from all science fields are encouraged to enter. The competition dataset is from the Earth Sciences area and provides a valuable learning opportunity to enhance your visualization skills in all research areas. 

Prizes:

Prizes up for grabs include high-capacity SSD drives or up to $1,000 towards registration and travel to HPCS 2017, Canada’s premier Advanced Research Computing (ARC) conference, at Queen’s University in Kingston, ON (June 5-9, 2017).

The top visualizations will also be showcased on the Compute Canada website and in Compute Canada’s booth at Supercomputing 2016 in Salt Lake City in November.

Interested in this Challenge? 

The first step is to indicate your interest here. You will then be emailed a link to the competition dataset and the connection details for the Q&A Session.

If you have any questions, please contact viz-challenge@computecanada.ca. Compute Canada will also publish all challenge information on its website.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Description

Are you considering applying to one of Compute Canada’s Resource Allocation Competitions (RAC)? Or, are you wondering if there are other ways to access Compute Canada resources to support your work? Compute Canada is hosting an online Q&A Session to answer these questions and more, including “Do I need to apply for a RAC?” and “Which competition should I apply for?”.

This session will also explain Compute Canada’s Rapid Access Service, which allows users to access modest quantities of resources without having to go through a competition or scientific review process.

For more information, email rac@computecanada.ca or visit the Compute Canada website to learn more about the Resource Allocation Competitions or the Rapid Access Service.

Date:
Location

Lillooet Room 301, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

Registation / More Information:

Details and registration: https://arc.ubc.ca/canarie-session

Speaker Info
Description

CANARIE is looking for feedback from researchers on its Research Software Program to make sure the program meets the needs of Canadian researchers.

 

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:
Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid
Description

This webinar is geared towards all researchers who need to visualize their 2D or 3D data and want to automate their visualization workflow. We will take a look at the Python interface in VisIt, one of several popular open-source, general-purpose visualization packages.

We will learn different ways to launch scripts and will use them for a number of rendering tasks including processing time-dependent datasets and creating animations. We will also take a look at several other interesting topics in VisIt workflows such as visualizing the terrain in 3D and rendering molecules.

Prerequisite Knowledge and Requirements:

  • This is an information-sharing session only, with demonstrations led by the speaker for participants to observe. No previous experience with VisIt or Python is required. 

Who Should Attend:

  • Anyone interested in data visualization tools is welcome to attend.
  • This session is open to all faculty, students and staff in any discipline. 

 

 

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The featured image, courtesy of Paul Kent at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, shows the charge density (volume+contours) of 1/8th of a FePt nanoparticle. Image sourced from the VisIt website gallery.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Description

Are you considering applying to one of Compute Canada’s Resource Allocation Competitions (RAC)? WestGrid Support Staff are hosting an online “Office Hours” session to answer your questions about RAC 2017, including:

  • Do I need to apply to the RAC or can my needs be served by the Rapid Access Service?
  • Which competition should I apply to?
  • What kinds of resources are available to request?
  • I had a RAC allocation last year, do I need to re-apply?
  • ...and more!

Note:
There is no formal presentation being delivered. You can drop in / connect at any point during the hour-long session to ask WestGrid Support Staff your question. You can stay to listen to other users' questions, or disconnect after getting the answers you need.

Reference Material:
Compute Canada hosted an online Q&A Session about RAC 2017 on October 13:

Who Should Attend:

  • Any researcher who submitted a Notice of Intent (NOI) to the Research Platforms and Portals (RPP) Competition and received an invite to submit an application
  • Any researcher considering applying to the Resources for Research Groups (RRG) Competition
  • Any researcher curious about the Rapid Access Service and how it differs from the annual resource competitions

How to Participate:

  • CLICK HERE to register online
  • This session will be delivered online using Vidyo. Connection details will be sent to all registrants.

For more information, email info@westgrid.ca.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Diane Miller
Project Manager
Genome Sciences Centre
,
Scott Baker
Project Manager, IT / Systems
Genome Sciences Centre
Description

The BC Cancer Agency Canada’s Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre (GSC) is one of 15 research programs that operate as part of the BC Cancer Research Centre. It is also an advanced research computing site within the Compute Canada national platform, benefiting researchers across Canada with increased access to bioinformatics software, expertise and extremely secure computing storage.

As the largest capacity genomics centre of its type in Canada, the GSC specializes in high-throughput, large-scale genome research activities encompassing cancer genetics, bioinformatics, LIMS, DNA sequencing, data analysis, genome mapping, gene expression profiling, proteomics and technology development.

This session will be delivered in two parts:

  • Part A: The GSC Sequencing Platform
  • Part B: The GSC Compute Platform

Each part will cover:

  • the platform in general,
  • what services are offered to researchers, and
  • how to access those services. 

Audience:
This session is targeted at anyone involved in compatible research (health sciences) who may be in need of DNA sequencing and/or bioinformatics support and/or tools and platforms related to bioniformatics. Research Administrators working together with researchers in these areas may also find this session useful.

Experience Needed:
None.

Goals/Objectives:

  • Provide a greater awareness about the GSC, its platforms and services.
  • Ensure the community knows how to contact the GSC should they have questions or feel there is an opportunity for collaboration.
  • Highlight some of the new directions for the GSC

 

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Roland Santos
Assistant Systems Coordinator
Genome Sciences Centre
Description

ORCA (the genOmics Research Container Architecture) is a platform for bioinformatics analysis. It is suited for those wishing to conduct self-serve analysis using their own existing data. Hundreds of bioinformatics tools from Homebrew-Science are pre-installed in ORCA. This service is available as part of the GSC Advanced Research Computing Platform and Compute Canada Node. For more information on ORCA or to view a list of its bioinformatics and analysis software applications and libraries, click here.

In this session, Roland Santos from the Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre will use demonstrations and hands-on exercises to provide an in-depth tour of the key features and capabilities of the ORCA environment. Participants can apply for an ORCA account to follow along with the exercises, or simply watch the webinar to learn more about the platform.

Audience:

  • This session is targeted at anyone interested in learning about bioinformatics tools and platforms, particularly if they are interested in a hands-on session.

Experience Needed:

  • Participants must have experience with *nix Shell and SSH.

Goals/Objectives:

  • Learn what ORCA is, what is included, and what it can best be used for
  • Hands-on demonstration and training regarding how to access, login, and perform basic tasks in the ORCA platform with examples

 

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Description

As part of our ongoing initiative to keep users regularly informed and engaged, WestGrid is hosting its next Community Town Hall session on Thursday, November 24. WestGrid's management team and support staff will share the latest updates on:

  • The migration of users and data from Silo, Jasper and Hungabee
  • RAC and allocatable systems for 2017
  • Upcoming ARC training opportunities

Town Hall attendees are welcome to ask questions on these and other topics.

The session will be streamed live online and is open to any existing WestGrid or Compute Canada user as well as members of the broader research community from all disciplines and departments.

More Information 
Questions and comments are welcome at any time by sending an email to info@westgrid.ca.

If you missed our October Town Hall, you can view the slides & video recording here.

 

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

 

Speaker Info
Description

Our next online Office Hours session will focus on recent training sessions on advanced research computing tools and services available to researchers in bioinformatics, genomics, and health sciences. We're bringing back our session presenters for a 30-minute followup Q&A:

Scott Baker
Project Manager, IT / Systems, Genome Sciences Centre
Presentation: Introduction to the BC Cancer Agency Canada’s Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre

Phillip Richmond
Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, BC Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia
Presentation: Introduction to Next Generation Sequencing Analysis Part I: Short-read Mapping and Visualization

Roland Santos
Assistant Systems Coordinator, Genome Sciences Centre
Presentation: A Hands-On Introduction to ORCA (the genOmics Research Container Architecture)
 

Note: 
There is no formal presentation being delivered. You can drop in / connect at any point during the session to ask your question(s). You can stay to listen to other users' questions, or disconnect after getting the answers you need.

 

How to Participate:

  • CLICK HERE to register online
  • This session will be delivered online using Vidyo. Connection details will be sent to all registrants.
Date:
Location

In-Person:
IRMACS Presentation Studio (ASB 10900), Simon Fraser University, Burnaby

Online:
http://tinyurl.com/irmacsvidyo

Registation / More Information:

Registration is FREE but required.
Register here: https://www.sfu.ca/vpresearch/events/2016/bioinformatics-for-infectious-disease-control.html

For more information, contact Dr. Fiona Brinkman at brinkman@sfu.ca.

Speaker Info
Description

Public health and Agri-food labs around the world are embracing the use of microbial genome sequencing to improve infectious disease surveillance and outbreak investigations. This technology requires new computational methods to translate this “big data” into meaningful information for the front lines in infectious disease response.

SFU's Office of the Vice-President, Research is hosting a free mini-symposium, exploring computational research that aims to address key challenges of potential broad interest to other fields. Topics discussed include cross-jurisdictional data sharing, improving predictive methods, and large-scale data visualization - applied to microbial whole genome/metagenome data.

If you can't attend in person, the sessions will be webcast online (webstream link listed below).

This event is supported by SFU's Big Data Initiative.

Agenda

8:30 - 9:00 Arrive (coffee, tea, muffins provided)
9:00 - 9:30 Welcome and Introductory talk: “Integrated, Rapid Infectious Disease Analysis: An Overview”
Dr. Fiona Brinkman (SFU)
9:30 - 10:00 Data Standardization and Sharing in Public Health Microbiology
Dr. Will Hsiao (BC Centre for Disease Control)
10:00 - 10:30 chewBBACA and PHYLOViZ Online: New Developments for a Gene-by-Gene Approach
Dr. João Carriço (University of Lisbon)
10:30 - 11:00 Health Break. Refreshments will be provided (IRMACS Atrium)
11:00 - 11:30 CARD - Predicting Antimicrobial Resistance
Dr. Andrew McArthur (McMaster University)
11:30 - 12:00 Monitoring the Microbiome in an Assisted-Care Facility
Dr. Rob Beiko (Dalhousie University)
12:00 - 12:30 Visualization of Public Health Data 
Ana Crisan (UBC)

 

How to Participate

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

 

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions about this session.

Speaker Info
Jamie Rosner
National Bioinformatics Team Co-Lead, Compute Canada; Life Sciences Analyst, Advanced Research Computing
The University of British Columbia
Description

Does your research have needs for large-scale computing, data management, or storage? Compute Canada, in partnership with WestGrid and other regional organizations, provides state-of-the-art advanced research computing (ARC) systems and software for Canadian researchers and their collaborators in all academic and industrial sectors. Compute Canada receives funding through the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) and its services and resources are available for free to any academic researcher in Canada.

Join us for an introduction to Compute Canada and WestGrid. This talk will provide an overview of some of the expertise, resources and services available to support your research, and will explain how to get an account and start using the systems. University faculty, grad students, and staff from all disciplines are invited to attend.

Compute Canada service offerings include:

  • Computation – Expandable power ranging from the equivalent of a second desktop to supercomputers with thousands of cores, terabytes of RAM, and a variety of system architectures.
  • Data Storage – Robust storage solutions for backup and mid- to long-term storage.
  • Cloud – Virtual-machine development space that includes an outward-facing IP address.
  • General Analyst/Consultant Support – Consultations regarding project architecture and resource needs with technical experts with skills ranging from specialty software selection to program optimization.
  • Globus – Fast, secure, sharing and fire-and-forget file transfers.
  • ownCloud – 50Gb of shareable, Dropbox-like space available across multiple devices.
  • Portals – Hosting for specialized data and tools for entire research communities.
  • Specialized Software – More than 250 software programs and packages already integrated with Compute Canada systems.
  • Visualization Support – Dedicated 3D visualization expert available.

Who Should Attend:

  • Any research faculty, grad students, or university staff in any discipline. This is an information session, so no previous knowledge or experience with advanced research computing is necessary.

 

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

 

For more information on this session, please contact us.

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid / Compute Canada
Description

Unlike our previous visualization webinars on very specific topics, this month's talk is targeted at the widest audience possible. We will describe scientific visualization support available to all researchers in WestGrid / Compute Canada.

This presentation will talk about remote visualization and its various implementations across the country, outline some of the popular open-source visualization packages, and provide an overview of Compute Canada's data visualization training events.

Request for Future Topic Suggestions:

  • We would like to get feedback from the research community about future topics we should cover in these bimonthly webinars. To vote on and/or submit suggestions, please click here.

 

Image Credit:
This is a screen capture of an animation created by Svetlana Baoukina, Dmitri Rozmanov and Peter Tieleman (University of Calgary) which shows a lipid monolayer in equilibrium with lipid vesicles on water surface. The movie (which can be viewed here) was generated using ParaView and simulations were performed on WestGrid (Compute Canada) resources.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

 

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or if you have any questions about this sessions.

Speaker Info
Ali Kerrache
High Performance Computing - Analyst
University of Manitoba, WestGrid / Compute Canada
Description

This online workshop explores how to use OpenMP to improve the speed of serial jobs on multi-core machines. Participants are led through a series of hands-on, interactive examples, focusing on multi-threading parallel programming.

The topics covered include:

  • Basic OpenMP operations
  • Loops
  • Reduction variables

Who Should Attend:

  • This session is intended for current WestGrid / Compute Canada account holders who have experience with programming in C/C++ or FORTRAN and would like to learn how to use OpenMP directives in their code.

Pre-Requisite Skills / Knowledge:

  • All attendees must have familiarity with logging in to WestGrid systems, using UNIX and basic job script commands. If you are a new user who has never written C/C++ or FORTRAN code before, this session may not be suited for you at this time.
  • All attendees must have accounts with Compute Canada and WestGrid
Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

 

Email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions about this session.

Speaker Info
Chris Fjell
Health Research Scientific Data Analyst
University of British Columbia
Description

REDCap is a free, secure, web-based application designed to support data capture for research studies. This online session will provide an introductory overview of:

  • how REDCap works
  • key features
  • how to install it at your university

A portion of the presentation will also be used to discuss best practices in managing security and ethics obligations.

Who Should Attend:

  • Any research faculty, grad students, or university staff in any discipline interested in data management and/or data security and ethics obligations.
Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

 

For more information on this session or if you have questions about the required skills or knowledge, please contact us.

Speaker Info
Martin Krzywinski
Staff Scientist
Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Research Centre
Description

Well-designed figures can illustrate complex concepts and patterns that may be difficult to express concisely in words. Figures that are clear, concise and attractive are effective–they form a strong connection with the reader and communicate with immediacy. These qualities can be achieved by employing principles of graphic design, which are based on our understanding of how we perceive, interpret and organize visual information.

We all use words to communicate information–our ability to do so is extremely sophisticated. We have large vocabularies, understand a variety of verbal and written styles and effortlessly parse errors in real time. But when we need to present complex information visually, we may find ourselves at a ‘loss for words’, graphically speaking.

Do images and graphics possess the same qualities as the spoken or written word? Can they be concise and articulate? Are there rules and guidelines for visual vocabulary and grammar? How can we focus the viewer’s attention to emphasize a point? Can we modulate the tone and volume of visual communication? These and other questions are broadly addressed through design, which is the conscious application of visual and organizational principles to communication. All of us have already been schooled in ‘written design’ (grammar) and most of us have had some experience with ‘verbal design’ (public speaking) but relatively few have had training in ‘visual design’ (information design and visualization).

This talk distills core concepts of information design into practical guidelines for creating scientific figures. We will explain how to generate visual vocabularies with graphical elements, combine them into phrases, and package them into a complete figure, the visual equivalent of a paragraph. We show how effective designs for this composition are underpinned by conclusions from studies in visual perception and awareness.

Who Should Attend:

  • Any research faculty, grad students, or university staff interested in learning practical guidelines for creating scientific figures.

Presentation Slides:

WGwebinar_VisualScienceCommunications.pdf

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

 

Please email info@westgrid.ca for more information or with any questions about this session.

Speaker Info
Ali Kerrache
High Performance Computing - Analyst
University of Manitoba, WestGrid / Compute Canada
Description

This online workshop will build on the Intro to OpenMP: Part 1 session (delivered on January 31). This session will delve deeper into using OpenMP and introduce new OpenMP directives to tackle hard-to-parallelize problems. Participants will be led through a series of hands-on, interactive examples during the workshop.

The topics covered include:

  • Review of the loop parallelism
  • Load balancing
  • Conditional multithreading

Who Should Attend:

  • This session is intended for current WestGrid / Compute Canada account holders who have experience with programming in C/C++ or FORTRAN and would like to learn how to use OpenMP directives in their code.

Pre-Requisite Skills / Knowledge:

  • All attendees must have familiarity with logging in to WestGrid systems, using UNIX and basic job script commands. If you are a new user who has never written C/C++ or FORTRAN code before, this session may not be suited for you at this time.
  • All attendees must have accounts with Compute Canada and WestGrid

 

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Questions and comments are welcome at any time by sending an email to info@westgrid.ca. If you missed our November Town Hall, you can view the slides & video recording here.

Click HERE to view the slides for the presentation.

Speaker Info
Description

As part of our ongoing initiative to keep our users regularly informed and engaged, WestGrid is hosting another Community Town Hall session on Friday January 27.

WestGrid's management team and support staff will share the latest updates on:

  • the new national system at SFU - Cedar/GP2;
  • the migration of users and data off WestGrid legacy systems
  • upcoming ARC training opportunities

Town Hall attendees are welcome to ask questions on these and other topics. This session will be webstreamed live online and is open to any existing WestGrid or Compute Canada user as well as members of the broader research community from all disciplines and departments.

Date:
Location

Simon Fraser University Vancouver
Harbour Centre
Room 7000

Registation / More Information:

This workshop is offered through SFU Library's Research Commons and registration is open to SFU and UBC graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty.

To register, click the link below:
https://noncredit.its.sfu.ca/modules/shop/index.html?action=section&OfferingID=4069&SectionID=9554

Note: You will need to create an account if you haven't registered for an SFU Continuing Studies course before.

 

For more information on the SFU Research Bazaar, visit the event website.

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid / Compute Canada
Description

As part of the Simon Fraser University's Research Bazaar, WestGrid's Visualization Coordinator Alex Razoumov is delivering a workshop focusing on scientific visualization using VisIt, an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization tool.

With VisIt, users can interactively visualize and analyze 2- and 3- dimensional data defined on structured, adaptive, and unstructured meshes. VisIt users can also animate these datasets in time, and manipulate them with a variety of operators.

Sample data and codes will be provided for the exercises, or participants can bring their own dataset if they would like to visualize it with VisIt.

Workshop Outline:

  • Introduction and VisIt's GUI overview 
  • accessing data and managing files 
  • working with plots 
  • working with operators 
  • interactive tools 
  • quantitative analysis 
  • making it pretty 
  • animation and keyframing 
  • data comparison 
  • scripting 
  • plots, selections, exporting 
  • overview of remote visualization resources

Who Should Attend:

  • All disciplines and experience levels are welcome. No prior visualization experience is required.
  • Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing data sets is invited to attend.

Note: Please bring your own laptop -- with VisIt installed (http://goo.gl/KcGWHa) prior to the workshop -- and power cord.

Date:
Location

ECHA L1-220
University of Alberta

Registation / More Information:

 

 

--------------
The featured image, courtesy of Forrest Hoffman and Jamison Daniel of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is a visualization that depicts the carbon dioxide from various sources that are advected individually as tracers in the atmosphere model. Carbon dioxide from the land is shown as plumes during February 1900. Image sourced from the VisIt website gallery.

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid / Compute Canada
Description

WestGrid is pleased to present a free workshop on scientific visualization using VisIt, an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization tool.

With VisIt, users can interactively visualize and analyze 2- and 3-dimensional data defined on structured, adaptive, and unstructured meshes. VisIt users can also animate these datasets in time, and manipulate them with a variety of operators.

Pre-requisites:

  • No prior visualization experience is required. We will provide sample data and codes for the exercises, or you can bring your own dataset if you would like to visualize it with VisIt. 
  • This full-day workshop will feature many interactive hands-on exercises, so attendees will need to bring a laptop (and a powercord) they can use. The laptop should have VisIt installed (http://goo.gl/KcGWHa) prior to the workshop.

Workshop Outline:

  • Introduction and VisIt's GUI overview
  • accessing data and managing files
  • working with plots
  • working with operators
  • interactive tools
  • quantitative analysis
  • making it pretty
  • animation and keyframing
  • data comparison
  • scripting
  • plots, selections, exporting
  • overview of remote visualization resources

Please note that coffee / cookies will be provided in the morning and afternoon breaks, but there will be no organized food so attendees are responsible for their own lunch.

Who Should Attend:

  • All disciplines and experience levels are welcome.
  • You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop.
  • Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing data sets is invited to attend.

Questions:

Date:
Location

SFU Harbour Centre Campus Vancouver
515 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

Registation / More Information:

To register, please visit the Eventbrite page or visit the FoR Vancouber website for more details.

Speaker Info
Description

On February 20th, 2017, the first FoR Vancouver symposium will take place, bringing together early-career researchers from across BC to discuss challenges facing the future of Canadian science, including:

  1. Funding for early career researchers
  2. Training and transparency of career outcomes of early career researchers
  3. Increased connectivity – how to promote and strengthen conversations about research and infrastructure between research institutions and provinces
  4. The structure of the scientific workforce

FoR Vancouver represent early-career researchers from across Vancouver and British Columbia, from SFU to UBC to UVic. Current job structures in science, and opportunities for funding, training, and support make careers in research unpredictable and insecure for many of Canada’s most passionate young scientists. However, a more sustainable career environment could secure world-leading science in Canada and BC, which will be vital to deal with health, environmental, agricultural, and economic challenges to come.

For more informarion check out the website https://forvancouver.wordpress.com or email  FoRVancouverBC@gmail.com.

Speakers

Keynote address: Prof. Santa Ono, President and Vice-Chancellor, University of British Columbia

Keynote address: Dr. Terry Thomas, Chief Scientific Officer, STEMCELL Technologies

Panelist: Dr. Liisa Galea, University of British Columbia

Panelist: Dr. Lara Boyd, University of British Columbia

Panelist: Dr. Eric Hsu, Istuary Innovation Group

Panelist: Dr. Marcia MacDonald, Genome British Columbia

Who are Future of Research?

FoR is an international group of passionate young scientists and advocates for smart science policy. Our mission is to improve the scientific research enterprise. To do this, we’re helping junior scientists organise conferences to discuss the problems they perceive with science – and more importantly, possible solutions to fix them. We’re then working on trying to make these solutions a reality, working with and advocating to institutions, science societies, federal agencies and senior scientists to effect change – and to ensure the voices of those who will be scientists* of the future are heard.

Who are FoR Vancouver?

FoR Vancouver represent early-career researchers from across Vancouver and British Columbia, from SFU to UBC to UVic. Current job structures in science, and opportunities for funding, training, and support make careers in research unpredictable and insecure for many of Canada’s most passionate young scientists. However, a more sustainable career environment could secure world-leading science in Canada and BC, which will be vital to deal with health, environmental, agricultural, and economic challenges to come.

These are internationally vital issues. We stand with Future of Research, and Future of Research Canada, to help change the face of science.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Description

As part of our ongoing initiative to keep our users regularly informed and engaged, WestGrid is hosting another Community Town Hall session on Friday, March 17.

WestGrid's management team and support staff will share the latest updates on:

  • the migration of users and data off WestGrid legacy systems
  • RAC 2017
  • Compute Canada account renewals
  • upcoming ARC training opportunities

Town Hall attendees are welcome to ask questions on these and other topics. This session will be webstreamed live online and is open to any existing WestGrid or Compute Canada user as well as members of the broader research community from all disciplines and departments.

More Information:
Questions and comments are welcome at any time by sending an email to info@westgrid.ca. If you missed our January Town Hall, you can view the slides & video recording here.

Date:
Location

BI 211, Biological Sciences Building
507 Campus Dr NW 
University of Calgary

Registation / More Information:

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid / Compute Canada
Description

WestGrid is pleased to present a free workshop on scientific visualization using VisIt, an open source, multi-platform data analysis and visualization tool.

With VisIt, users can interactively visualize and analyze 2- and 3-dimensional data defined on structured, adaptive, and unstructured meshes. VisIt users can also animate these datasets in time, and manipulate them with a variety of operators.

Pre-requisites:

  • No prior visualization experience is required. We will provide sample data and codes for the exercises, or you can bring your own dataset if you would like to visualize it with VisIt. 
  • This full-day workshop will feature many interactive hands-on exercises, so attendees will need to bring a laptop (and a powercord) they can use. The laptop should have VisIt installed (http://goo.gl/KcGWHa) prior to the workshop.

Workshop Outline:

  • Introduction and VisIt's GUI overview
  • accessing data and managing files
  • working with plots
  • working with operators
  • interactive tools
  • quantitative analysis
  • making it pretty
  • animation and keyframing
  • data comparison
  • scripting
  • plots, selections, exporting
  • overview of remote visualization resources

Please note that coffee / cookies will be provided in the morning and afternoon breaks, but there will be no organized food so attendees are responsible for their own lunch.

Who Should Attend:

  • All disciplines and experience levels are welcome.
  • You do not need to be a current WestGrid account holder to participate in this workshop.
  • Any researcher who is interested in learning more about tools and techniques for visualizing data sets is invited to attend.

Questions:

 

--------------

The featured image, courtesy of the VisIt website gallery, shows a pseudocolor plot that highlights a Raleigh-Taylor instability caused by two mixing fluids.

Date:
Location
Registation / More Information:

 

 

-------
The image featured on this page is courtesy of the ParaViewWeb website.

 

Speaker Info
Alex Razoumov
Visualization Coordinator
WestGrid / Compute Canada
Description

ParaViewWeb is a lightweight JavaScript API for writing HTML5 web applications that utilize a remote ParaView server for running a visualization in a web browser.

ParaViewWeb is included with each copy of ParaView compiled with Python support. For a single user, ParaViewWeb can be launched with a Python script that will directly start a web server. For multiple users, one would normally use a separate front end such an Apache web server that would interface with the Python launcher to start a new visualization process for each user. ParaView comes with several sample web applications, the most complete of which is the Web Visualizer.

Topics Covered:

  • Introduction to ParaViewWeb
  • Overview of Web Visualizer's main features
  • Building simple ParaViewWeb apps from scratch 

Prerequisite Knowledge and Requirements:

  • This is an information-sharing session only, with demonstrations led by the speaker for participants to observe.
  • No previous experience with ParaView or Python is required. 

Who Should Attend:

  • Anyone interested in data visualization tools is welcome to attend.
  • This session is open to all faculty, students and staff in any discipline (you do not need to be a WestGrid or Compute Canada user). 

For more information on this session, please contact Alex Razoumov - alex.razoumov@westgrid.ca

 

Date:
Monday, June 5, 2017 to Wednesday, June 14, 2017
Location

UBC Room # TBC

Registation / More Information:

 

Speaker Info
Phillip Richmond
PhD Student, Wasserman Lab, Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics
BC Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia
Description

Held over the course of seven days (June 5-9 and June 12-14), this workshop series will cover:

  • an introduction to linux how to use WestGrid / Compute Canada high performance computing resources
  • DNA sequencing analysis including variant calling and annotation
  • RNA-seq analysis pipelines for identifying differential expression

Within this workshop we will use cutting-edge open source software frequently used by researchers in the field.

Course Details:

  • 7 sessions, 1 mid-series 'exam'
  • Sessions will take place from June 5-9 and June 12-14
  • Sessions will be held from either 10am - 12pm Pacific or 9:30 - 11:30 am (see schedule for times)
  • Participants can attend in-person at the BC Children's Hospital (see schedule for locations) or online via videoconference

Schedule:

  • Monday, June 5 - Introduction to Linux I, Basic Command Line
    10am-12pm Pacific - Room #3113, BC Children's Hospital

  • Tuesday, June 6 - Introduction to Linux II, Interacting with the Queue
    10am-12pm Pacific - Room #3113, BC Children's Hospital

  • Wednesday, June 7 - Short read mapping and visualization
    9:30-11:30am Pacific - Room #3113, BC Children's Hospital

  • Thursday, June 8 - Variant calling - small variants
    10am-12pm Pacific - Room #2108, BC Children's Hospital

  • Friday, June 9 - Mid-Series Exam
    10am-12pm Pacific - Room #2108, BC Children's Hospital

  • Monday, June 12 - Variant Annotation
    10am-12pm Pacific - Room #3113, BC Children's Hospital

  • Tuesday, June 13 - RNA-seq read mapping
    10am-12pm Pacific - Room #3113, BC Children's Hospital

  • Wednesday, June 14 - RNA-seq II
    9:30-11:30am Pacific - Room #3113, BC Children's Hospital

A detailed syllabus can be found here.

Session Format:

  • Each session's timeslot will be divided into:
    • 45 minute lecture
    • 15 minute Q&A
    • 45 minute problem set
    • 15 minute wrap-up
  • The June 9 session will be used for a mid-series 'exam'

Who Should Attend:

  • Any research faculty, grad students, or university staff interested in learning the basic steps of genomic analysis using high performance computing resources.
  • The modular setup of the workshop series allows users of any skill level to attend, from those with zero experience in the linux shell, to experienced bioinformaticians eager to learn a new tool set.

Prerequisite Requirements:

  • You need a Compute Canada / WestGrid account to participate in this session, however, a guest account can be created for you if needed.
  • When you register for the session, please indicate if you require a guest account.

For more information on this session or if you have questions about the required skills or knowledge, please contact us.

Session Materials Archive

To access the slides, video recordings, problem sets, and other workshop materials, please visit:
https://phillip-a-richmond.github.io/Introduction-to-Genomic-Analysis/

Date:
Monday, May 15, 2017 - 9:00 MDT to